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Old 03-29-2011, 05:10 PM   #16
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@loneframer nice work. I cant say Ive ever seen a window with the sill that low in a stairwell.

Does it meet code ?????
In my experience, any window in a stairwell, or less than 18" above the floor to the glass has to be tempered glass. This is a fairly new home that was subject to today's building codes, so I would guess that it's tempered, but can't say for sure. It is more than 18" above the pie shaped landing though.

I just did the chair rail and panel frames.

I'd hate to take a fall down those steps and land in the front yard though.

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Old 03-30-2011, 10:46 AM   #17
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I think what the OP was specifically asking for was how to go about cutting those extreme actue angles, as mitre saws alone won't cut such an angle.

I made a triangle out of scrap baseboard molding, nailed it together and use that as a jig which allows me to cut those acute angles. Make sure you firmly clamp it to your mitre saw so it doesn't move. The triangle will act as the new mitre fence.

You can probably google it and find an example or I'll take a picture for you tonight if you need me to.
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Old 03-30-2011, 11:10 AM   #18
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loneframer, I too cut extreme angles that way. With a wedge shaped fence cut from a piece of scrap. However, I wouldn't advise just anyone to do so. Even the most experienced carpenter can become too comfortable with his tools. If something were to slip the blade will catch a tooth and pull the piece being cut towards the blade at those angles. Can one always remember to hold the piece firmly enough to make the cut and loose enough to let the piece go if its going to? Yes, for speed that's how we do it. But the weekend working homeowner should stay away from such practices.
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Old 03-30-2011, 11:32 AM   #19
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loneframer, However, I wouldn't advise just anyone to do so. Even the most experienced carpenter can become too comfortable with his tools. If something were to slip the blade will catch a tooth and pull the piece being cut towards the blade at those angles. .

Been there done that a few times myself...rushing....

Black & Decker private labels a miter saw for Craftsman that will cut acute angles. The fences swing. It looks like it could be a little dangerous to me. Maybe thats because Im so use to the standard saws..

http://www.toolsnob.com/archives/201...te_-_revie.php

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgo3Q...eature=related

Hello weekend warrior good bye fingers........
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Old 03-30-2011, 12:16 PM   #20
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loneframer, I too cut extreme angles that way. With a wedge shaped fence cut from a piece of scrap. However, I wouldn't advise just anyone to do so. Even the most experienced carpenter can become too comfortable with his tools. If something were to slip the blade will catch a tooth and pull the piece being cut towards the blade at those angles. Can one always remember to hold the piece firmly enough to make the cut and loose enough to let the piece go if its going to? Yes, for speed that's how we do it. But the weekend working homeowner should stay away from such practices.
A VERY GOOD POINT indeed.

However, if you're nervous and don't hold the item you're cutting securely, then you shouldn't be operating a saw, just as you shouldn't rush or use a saw when you are tired and aren't your sharpest.

That being said, I cut hundreds of angles on my saw the past 2 weeks for all the wall frames I am doing in 4 different rooms and never had an issue (knock on wood) , but of course I smashed my pinky into metal while using a dull saw at Home Cheapo to make one lousy cut.
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Old 03-30-2011, 04:49 PM   #21
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.....Use the block of wood as a fence and cut, using caution to keep your body parts away from the blades path.
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Originally Posted by marttinen View Post
loneframer, I too cut extreme angles that way. With a wedge shaped fence cut from a piece of scrap. However, I wouldn't advise just anyone to do so. Even the most experienced carpenter can become too comfortable with his tools. If something were to slip the blade will catch a tooth and pull the piece being cut towards the blade at those angles. Can one always remember to hold the piece firmly enough to make the cut and loose enough to let the piece go if its going to? Yes, for speed that's how we do it. But the weekend working homeowner should stay away from such practices.
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A VERY GOOD POINT indeed.

However, if you're nervous and don't hold the item you're cutting securely, then you shouldn't be operating a saw, just as you shouldn't rush or use a saw when you are tired and aren't your sharpest.
I agree with you guys and inserted the warning in my post.

The OP asked for an easy way to perform a task and I gave him my thoughts.

Anyone who is not versed on the inherent risk of using power tools of any kind should not do so. Any tool that will cut through wood will also cut through flesh and bone.

I've been using power tools for over 30 years and have had some minor injuries and close calls. However, I do still have all my body parts, due completely to my respect for the tools and what they can do, along with diligent safety practices.
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:03 PM   #22
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I do this all the time, assume that because it’s common place for me that it should be easy for all.

I know that’s a mistake on my part when I get irritated with my help because they don’t see what I see.
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:03 PM   #23
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I do this all the time, assume that because itís common place for me that it should be easy for all.

I know thatís a mistake on my part when I get irritated with my help because they donít see what I see.
This thread prompted me to add a signature line.
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:53 PM   #24
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i agree.

and further, in my early days i hadnt learned that when cutting what i am hearing is just as important as what i'm seeing. I have havent had a serious kickback in years simply by holding tight and keeping square and listening to that blade....she'll let you know when she's out of square.

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A VERY GOOD POINT indeed.

However, if you're nervous and don't hold the item you're cutting securely, then you shouldn't be operating a saw, just as you shouldn't rush or use a saw when you are tired and aren't your sharpest.

That being said, I cut hundreds of angles on my saw the past 2 weeks for all the wall frames I am doing in 4 different rooms and never had an issue (knock on wood) , but of course I smashed my pinky into metal while using a dull saw at Home Cheapo to make one lousy cut.

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