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Old 06-04-2013, 09:13 PM   #16
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Yeah. The brackets can actually make it all look kind of classy.
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Old 06-04-2013, 11:25 PM   #17
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Ah yes. A neighbor has those. I didn't know they had a special name. Definitely worth considering, though I do like the clean look of a simple mitered corner.

Any tips for tread returns?
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:44 AM   #18
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The way I cut for the returns was a little dangerous as I mostly used a sliding compound miter saw. I used a tri square to mark off the 45° angle on the front edge of the tread for the 45° cut. I marked off 1 1/4 inch from the end and made the straight cut and stopped at where the straight cut intersected with the 45° mark.
I deleted how I cut the angle with a miter saw, it is just too dangerous that way.
I have also used the table saw to cut that angle but once again it is dangerous. If you have a band saw it would be easier and less danger but harder to get a good straight cut.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:30 PM   #19
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That's super helpful for the straight cuts. A sliding compound miter saw is expected to be our tool "gift" to ourselves for this project. We have a standard compound miter saw now. Sounds like a bandsaw with an angle guide may also be in our near future. The good news is, we do so may projects we'll use both of them again.
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Old 06-05-2013, 07:05 PM   #20
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I have return jigs that are made to run on a shaper, however you can make a template out of scrap wood and run with a router with a flush cutting bit. Sorry for the crappy drawing.
5/4 will be thick enough for 1" treads with no problem as long as y do a decent job gluing up
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Old 06-05-2013, 07:08 PM   #21
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Drawing is perfect It displays what you're talking about and that's very helpful. We'll keep in mind about using a router bit vs a band saw and decide which makes more sense for long term tool usage. Either way sounds doable.
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Old 06-05-2013, 08:11 PM   #22
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Btw you mentioned having painted skirtboards and natural risers. I think this would look weird and don't recall ever seeing it that way. But it's your call
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Old 06-05-2013, 08:27 PM   #23
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I hear your concern and recognize this is less common, however, it does exist and I think it looks nice. We are doing an iron and wood railing so are staining risers and treads to match the wood rail. Our house has all white trim, so the skirt will match the rest of the house. Here are a couple of images I found by googling.
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Old 06-10-2013, 03:22 PM   #24
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Cutting the miters on stringers is easy as I do it for a living. Just use a table saw and miter gauge. Have your stringers cut out and then lay the stringer across the table saw and line the riser part up with the edge of the miter groove that's in the table saw. Afflix your miter gauge to the backside angle you get. Now bevel your saw blade to a 45 and there you go. Of cource youll need a table saw that bevels left and one that bevels right (depending on which hand the miters will be. Another way you "could" do it if table saw method is not an option is which a jig saw by tilting it to a 45. Even if you don't get a true 45 using the jig saw you can still cut your miters on the risers greater than a 45. In the end you only need the front edge of the stringer and risers to touch. Any gap in the backside can be made stronger with some liquid nails and a glue block.
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Old 06-10-2013, 03:33 PM   #25
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As for the tread returns part we have a machine that cuts out all of that for us. We are actually the only company in the US to have this machine. Its made in Germany and when it breaks its a pain in the butt to get parts for it quickly. Our standard nosing is 1 1/8" which is what that machine is set up to so if there is ever a time we need to make a greater nosing for instance 1 1/4" we do those by hand. We have a template that is say a foot long. Its the width of the nosing so 1 1/4" with a stop on the side running length wise. Using that template we butt it up against the end of the tread and run a line from nosing to back of tread. Then butt template to nosing of tread at that end and run a line alone nosing. Using a miter saw we cut along that line up till it meets up with the line that runs parallel with the nosing. We have a template for our table saw made out of 3/4" playwood. its got 2 rails on the underside to fit in the miter gauge tracks and then fastened to the top side of the plywood are 2 fences that come out 45 degrees from the table saw blade. We butt the nosing of the tread against one of those (depending on what hand the return will be on), raise the blade all the way up, and run the tread through till it meets up with those 2 lines that intersect. Only thing you have to make sure of is where the saw blade cuts into the tread. Just have to make sure it cuts in right at the tip of the nosing where the edge of the tread is.
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