Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-02-2014, 12:31 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Camden County, NJ
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 2
Share |
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Since I finished my colonial remodel earlier this year, I have a void in my heart that needs to be filled for "building stuff". For example, the past few weeks I have done window boxes, birdhouses, etc. My quality has been good so far, but I still have a long way to go to take the jump to quality furniture or something that would makes its way into my house.

For my window box, I have some very small detail trim and molding pieces that I want to add to enhance the look. My issue is always cutting the corners. I have a miter saw that is clearly way to much juice (dewalt 12" compound sliding bevel miter saw). What is the best practice to cut this detail trim for tight joints?

As I embark on these woodworking projects, rather than "construction", are there any tools that are must have's and make the jobs easier and produce a greater result?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

__________________
Thomas


South Jersey - Camden County
tjbingha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2014, 01:32 PM   #2
STAFF
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 7,408
Rewards Points: 34
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


You shouldn't have any problems cutting the small trim with the saw you have, provided the teeth on the blade aren't too few. Large teeth, rough cut, small teeth, fine cut. When I make fine cuts in small molding I use a board laying on the miter saw and one standing up, I screw the two boards together. The part doesn't fly away when cut that way. I do clamp the board to the saw for safety.

__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to BigJim For This Useful Post:
ddawg16 (09-03-2014), oh'mike (09-02-2014), r0ckstarr (09-04-2014), tjbingha (09-02-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 06:46 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Camden County, NJ
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Thanks - just went to depot to grab small tooth blade. Do you think 80ct is fine or should I use 100?

Also- not quite sure what you mean when you say you have one board on the saw and one standing up. For some reason I am not visioning it properly. Thanks!
__________________
Thomas


South Jersey - Camden County
tjbingha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 06:54 AM   #4
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,666
Rewards Points: 96
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Make a sacrificial fence and bed---I usually use two strips of plywood--glued together to form an L shape---that will give you a new ,wood, fence and a wood table---the jig should be clamped or screwed to the saw.
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to oh'mike For This Useful Post:
BigJim (09-03-2014), ddawg16 (09-03-2014), r0ckstarr (09-04-2014), tjbingha (09-03-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 07:44 AM   #5
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,621
Rewards Points: 22
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


12 inch blades wobble. You need stabilizers to make a fine cut IF it is even possible with this saw. My neighbor had a Rigid and it was a POS. I have a Makita 10 inch, (LS1013) and it will cut a 4 x 4 in one pass, so in my opinion 12 inch is simply over-kill. That being said, you may want to pick up a Millers Falls Miter frame and a good, fine tooth back saw for fine work. Its hard to do fine work with a 12 inch beast made for rough framing.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jagans For This Useful Post:
ddawg16 (09-03-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 08:09 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,871
Rewards Points: 50
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


What Jim is describing would be similar to a zero clearance throat plate for a table saw.

The fence of your table saw has a wide throat opening and when small ends are cut off miter saw blade teeth are bad about grabbing those small ends and throwing them at a high rate of speed. The axillary fence and table will prevent that.
Fairview is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 08:10 AM   #7
JOATMON
 
ddawg16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: S. California
Posts: 7,309
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


All good advice above.

I agree with jagans about the 12" saw. I wish I had a 12" compound slider....would have come in real handy.

Jim is right about tooth count. 80 should be fine..at least for a 10' blade it is. 100? Jim?

And I really like Mike's idea about a sacrificial jig. I may have to try that one on my 'non sliding' compound miter.

Do a search on coping. I'll be trying that soon on my next cove molding project.


I have been thinking about getting one of these for those 'fine' adjustments.

__________________
"The dream is free but the hustle is sold separately."

My 2-Story Addition Build in Progress Link ... My Garage Build Link and My Jeep Build Link
ddawg16 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ddawg16 For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (09-04-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 08:11 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Camden County, NJ
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Jagans - that is what I would have imagined but it is worth a shot. I just do not want to screw up the mouldings as they are expensive and only come in 8 foot sections so if I screw it up I have to buy 8 more feet (72 inch window box).

I may try the miter box first...

The compound sliding is amazing and I had to cut more 2 x 12's in my house renovation than you can imagine, so it was certainly the saw I needed. It also feels like 1000 pounds and is very hard to move and until I build a garage stays in my basement which I cannot stand upright in...

Thanks all for your responses and I will keep you posted!
__________________
Thomas


South Jersey - Camden County

Last edited by tjbingha; 09-03-2014 at 08:15 AM. Reason: for new postings...
tjbingha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 08:19 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Camden County, NJ
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Dawg - sorry for the ignorance but what is that thing?

Also, where can I purchase a quality mitre box? I know depot has those plastic yellow ones but something tells me that is not the quality I am looking for.
__________________
Thomas


South Jersey - Camden County
tjbingha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 08:22 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,871
Rewards Points: 50
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post
All good advice above.

I agree with jagans about the 12" saw. I wish I had a 12" compound slider....would have come in real handy.

Jim is right about tooth count. 80 should be fine..at least for a 10' blade it is. 100? Jim?

And I really like Mike's idea about a sacrificial jig. I may have to try that one on my 'non sliding' compound miter.

Do a search on coping. I'll be trying that soon on my next cove molding project.


I have been thinking about getting one of these for those 'fine' adjustments.

I had the pleasure of trying one of those many years ago. It did an amazing job but was hydraulic, about 5 ft. long and cost more than my pay check at that time.
Fairview is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 08:32 AM   #11
JOATMON
 
ddawg16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: S. California
Posts: 7,309
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Quote:
Originally Posted by tjbingha View Post
Dawg - sorry for the ignorance but what is that thing?

Also, where can I purchase a quality mitre box? I know depot has those plastic yellow ones but something tells me that is not the quality I am looking for.
It's called a Miter Trimmer

https://www.grizzly.com/products/Miter-Trimmer/G1690

It's usually used for picture frames to give you those 'perfect' corners. My wife is an artist and is on me to make picture frames for her.

Don't waste your money on a miter box with manual saw. I had one....I could never get as good a cut as I get with my Ryobi Miter saw.

I think you will find that using a combination of the suggestions above will work for you.
__________________
"The dream is free but the hustle is sold separately."

My 2-Story Addition Build in Progress Link ... My Garage Build Link and My Jeep Build Link
ddawg16 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ddawg16 For This Useful Post:
tjbingha (09-03-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 01:28 PM   #12
STAFF
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 7,408
Rewards Points: 34
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post
It's called a Miter Trimmer

https://www.grizzly.com/products/Miter-Trimmer/G1690

It's usually used for picture frames to give you those 'perfect' corners. My wife is an artist and is on me to make picture frames for her.

Don't waste your money on a miter box with manual saw. I had one....I could never get as good a cut as I get with my Ryobi Miter saw.

I think you will find that using a combination of the suggestions above will work for you.
Dawg, I think you are talking about a miter box, a hand miter saw is different. The miter box is not very accurate at all but it can be. The hand miter saw is what I started out with years back before there was even an electric one (old ain't I LOL) Those ole hand miter saws, Like jagans is talking about, are more accurate than the electric ones of today.

Below is one like I used. You will be hard pressed to find one ready to use now days, you would probably have to restore it which would take some time. If you don't plan to do a whole lot of wood working it wouldn't be worth your time or money.

I have two miter saws, a 10 and a 12 inch compound slide. I agree the blade does wobble while it is coming up to speed, but if you will let the blade reach full speed before cutting, then cut slowly it won't wobble, unless you have a bad shaft on the saw or a very thin blade. A stabilizer is good to have but they will limit the depth of cut so there really wouldn't be a need to have a large blade to start with. I had a radial arm saw with a 16 inch blade and it didn't wobble but it was not thin either.

If your saw is cutting rough, that trimmer that Dawg posted will smooth the ends and make the joint very tight.

Oh, you would have to make a sacrificial board for the Miller Falls also. Just one more note, when you make the sacrificial board, make sure the screws or nails are not in the path of cut, that would get expensive quick.
Attached Images
 
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BigJim For This Useful Post:
ddawg16 (09-03-2014), oh'mike (09-04-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 01:45 PM   #13
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,621
Rewards Points: 22
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Quote:
Originally Posted by tjbingha View Post
Dawg - sorry for the ignorance but what is that thing?

Also, where can I purchase a quality mitre box? I know depot has those plastic yellow ones but something tells me that is not the quality I am looking for.
LOL That is a Miter Knife, the original ones were made by Dosch, I think they were German Made. I had one, and it was very nice for casing, but you had to get close with a miter saw first. Once I got my LS1013, it became redundant. If I did trim work for a living I would have kept it, but I don't. I usually cope all inside corners nowadays. One trick I have found that Im sure all you experienced guys probably know is to use my portable table saw (Hitachi) to back cut my copes with the carbide blade. Takes care but it really beats a hand coping saw.

I actually never use a miter saw for large dimensional lumber. I use my circular saw, or my Radial Arm Saw, sometimes. Its easier to move the saw to the work, than the work to the saw, in those cases, IMHO. Same with plywood.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 01:57 PM   #14
STAFF
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 7,408
Rewards Points: 34
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post
LOL That is a Miter Knife, the original ones were made by Dosch, I think they were German Made. I had one, and it was very nice for casing, but you had to get close with a miter saw first. Once I got my LS1013, it became redundant. If I did trim work for a living I would have kept it, but I don't. I usually cope all inside corners nowadays. One trick I have found that Im sure all you experienced guys probably know is to use my portable table saw (Hitachi) to back cut my copes with the carbide blade. Takes care but it really beats a hand coping saw.

I actually never use a miter saw for large dimensional lumber. I use my circular saw, or my Radial Arm Saw, sometimes. Its easier to move the saw to the work, than the work to the saw, in those cases, IMHO. Same with plywood.
I bet you hate that you got rid of that saw, that is a nice saw. Hadn't thought about using the table saw to cope with. OhMike uses a saber saw, I always just grabbed my coping saw, one thing I did was put the blade in the coping saw backwards, I cut on the push instead of the pull, didn't burr the front that way.

Sorry for the hijack.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to BigJim For This Useful Post:
jagans (09-03-2014)
Old 09-03-2014, 07:23 PM   #15
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,621
Rewards Points: 22
Default

Small Moulding and Trim Miter Cuts


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
I bet you hate that you got rid of that saw, that is a nice saw. Hadn't thought about using the table saw to cope with. OhMike uses a saber saw, I always just grabbed my coping saw, one thing I did was put the blade in the coping saw backwards, I cut on the push instead of the pull, didn't burr the front that way.

Sorry for the hijack.
No problem at all. Give the table saw a try, the swath of the blade back cuts your trim real nice. You just need calm nerves and continuous support under long pieces.

__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jagans For This Useful Post:
BigJim (09-03-2014)
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Moulding extension for sliding glass door trim. titan7 Carpentry 2 05-18-2013 08:30 AM
Hardwood Flooring install around this trim? Cmudr1 Flooring 4 01-31-2013 10:29 PM
Moulding and Trim in the basement Bruno71 Interior Decorating 2 04-19-2011 05:19 AM
Moulding up against door trim mommy5 Carpentry 9 04-30-2009 08:57 PM
Replacing all doors and trim...lots of questions... Badfish740 Carpentry 5 07-27-2008 12:16 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.