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Old 11-02-2010, 08:05 PM   #16
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


You're gonna kill the poor guy , but yeah, I agree replacing the whole stile would be much better of a long term fix.

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Old 11-02-2010, 08:54 PM   #17
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


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Jay,

He cut out nearly the entire stile on the strike. You now have an endgrain to endgrain connection,There is no way that patch will hold up. Now if the entire style were replaced....
I just have to ask, if the piece he has there now won't hold, how would a whole stile do any better? There is no way to fasten the whole stile any better than what he has now, as matter fact he has more to fasten to now than a whole stile. If he cut the whole stile off there would not be any dowels into the stile and it would twist and not hold at all. Unless he were to glue, clamp and install dowels in all the rails. What he is doing now will be just as strong as replacing the hole stile. He can install dowels into the rail and it will be strong. Like Jay said use pocket hole screws on both sides of the door install a few dowels and plenty of glue and it will hold.
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Old 11-02-2010, 09:24 PM   #18
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


Have to disagree with you on replacing the style. If you replace the style (and I've done this on restoration work) you will need to apply new sticking profile, then dowel or loose tenon the new style into all 3 rails. Having done this you will have rebuilt the door to its original quality.

What is depicted here is a style where about 1" of material is left of the original style. Simply adding screws and glue to two endgrain joints will not hold up for any decent length of time. If you don't think so take a 2x4, cut out 90% in the middle and add in another section of 2x4, after the glue sets give it a good whack and see what happens. Endgrain joints have very little structural strength, the long-grain of the original style is less than 1". Now if he'd done a stepped joint with loose tenons that would hold. It would however be a more complex joint, more along the lines of traditional japanese timber frame joinery.
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Old 11-02-2010, 10:31 PM   #19
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


So much to think about and now thanks to Kieth, I think I might have made a mistake. My thinking on it was just what someone had said, to drill into the ends at an angle and set 2 screws into the ends, I already have two going straight into the side. I didn't have my table saw on sight today, or I might have thought about cutting that entire side off and then attaching into the rails.
Of course I would not have cut so much off, the only part needing replaced 3 inches in was the hardware area. I wouldn't want to cut off three inches the length of the door for the sake of repairing this small 16 inch area. I do understand and agree that the entire stile (or a small strip with a deeper section where I cut all this out) would have been much stronger and would most likely have held longer. I'm gonna go with this and finish strengthening it with the end screws etc. Of course if or when this set up loosens, I might take the doors to my table saw, shave off an inch or so and then run a piece the length of the door, that would definitely seal that piece in there.

This is a rental property and these doors are very old as it is, but they are also very tight. It isn't a newer home, it is about 70 years old. I really think this is a better option than using those worthless hollow doors I had planned on using.

Thanks for all the input, it really helps and now I know to think a little longer and more in depth when I make these types of decisions.
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Old 11-02-2010, 11:59 PM   #20
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Mathewson View Post
Have to disagree with you on replacing the style. If you replace the style (and I've done this on restoration work) you will need to apply new sticking profile, then dowel or loose tenon the new style into all 3 rails. Having done this you will have rebuilt the door to its original quality.

What is depicted here is a style where about 1" of material is left of the original style. Simply adding screws and glue to two endgrain joints will not hold up for any decent length of time. If you don't think so take a 2x4, cut out 90% in the middle and add in another section of 2x4, after the glue sets give it a good whack and see what happens. Endgrain joints have very little structural strength, the long-grain of the original style is less than 1". Now if he'd done a stepped joint with loose tenons that would hold. It would however be a more complex joint, more along the lines of traditional japanese timber frame joinery.
Keith, I too did restoration work in homes of the 1800s the last 15 years of my 41 year career and have rebuilt antique doors as well. We were not speaking of rebuilding the door but cutting the stile off and replacing it. The man is trying to do a quick fix so he can rent the house and like he said if the door get sloppy he can run a strip from top to bottom to sturdy it up.
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Old 11-03-2010, 08:34 AM   #21
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


I understand that this is intended to be a quick fix, but if the end result doesn't hold up and it has to be redone then all that time is lost. The weak point is at the door handle, the very point which receives stress each time the door is opened or closed.

I'm not questioning your skill level, 41 years is a good long time to be in the business. I don't think the end result warrants the effort. My advise would be to cut off the rest of the style to the depth of the first cut. glue and then dowel into the rails. It would be fairly quick and would last.
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:35 AM   #22
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


The actual time I have in this particular repair is about an hour and a half. I have been working on this house for over 2 months with all the other things, like tiled floors, three other door installations, front, back and a utility. Painting, plumbing, a vent in a bath, new lights throughout, switches, electrical, among other things and of course the cleanup of the entire place. If these babies come loose, I'll deal with that later. At this point, I need to rent it out! IT's been empty for over a year, I had loads of OT and could handle it, but these days, it is straining the budget. ITs the last of nine I had at one time. And its the last!

Thanks for everyones help!
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:36 AM   #23
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


How could I have forgotten windows!
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:00 PM   #24
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


Well, it is done. They don't look so bad, a little paint and the handles... Shoot they even latch properly. Looks like those little doors are gonna be just fine.

Appreciate all the help.
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:01 PM   #25
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slab doors... How difficult is this gonna be?


One quick step to solve the end grain connection would be to drill a 1" hole from the edge of the door towards the centre of the door right at the 'patch' spot so that a short length of dowel acts at a 'keeper' for the patch... if you need an image, let me know.
It would act as a round loose tenon, sort of... but in the opposite direction. More like a key-way.

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