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jacksander 11-03-2012 11:33 AM

Simple Outdoor Bench
 
I want to build simple bench, as I don't have an extensive expertise in woodworking. The outdoor bench will be a present for my wife's birthday, so it has to look nice and be durable. Until now I haven't done much, except for finding some plans that suit my needs http://www.howtospecialist.com/outdo...n-bench-plans/ Are these plans good for a woodworking beginner? And I also want to know what kind of materials should I use to make it look good. Thank you in advance for your help.

ddawg16 11-03-2012 11:38 AM

Building it is easy....the materials are you hard part.....anything but teak or redwood is going to look like crap pretty quick if exposed to sun and rain.

Teak is expensive...redwood a lot cheaper but not as strong.

I would use redwood but make sure you give it plenty of support.

joecaption 11-03-2012 11:39 AM

Can not get much simpler then that. A ciruler saw, tape measure, a drills about all you would need.
Simplest way would be with using pressure treated wood.

ddawg16 11-03-2012 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1043838)
Can not get much simpler then that. A ciruler saw, tape measure, a drills about all you would need.
Simplest way would be with using pressure treated wood.

Joe....My wife would shoot me if I used PT wood........BTA....she has high standards.....hey, she married me....right?

jacksander 11-03-2012 12:14 PM

Thank you for the quick replies... I think I'm going to use redwood, as it seems to provide a decent compromise durability and aspect. Nevertheless, I'll keep pressure treated lumber as my second option, just in case the redwood exceeds my budget.

Fairview 11-03-2012 12:48 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Pictured is an old fashion process of assembling two pieces of lumber with screws. In our high speed society this has been deemed UN-necessary and the quality in a short while after construction will be very evident.

Screws being used today that have threaded shanks will not pull two components tightly together if this procedure isn't followed. Why, the threads keep the 2 pieces from sucking up tight because the screw head is never allowed to do its job. Try the two different methods on a scrap test piece and you'll see the difference.

NancyNGA 11-03-2012 02:53 PM

jacksander, I think that bench has too small a base relative to the top. It will tend to tip over backwards too easily. And I'll bet it will sway from side to side eventually. It would be better if the base were as wide, front to back, as the seat is deep, and cross braces would keep it from swaying, especially with redwood. Something shaped more like this one would be better. Just my opinion.:wink:

http://www.gardenbenches.net/images/...artabbench.jpg

DexterII 11-03-2012 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1043844)
Joe....My wife would shoot me if I used PT wood........BTA....she has high standards.....hey, she married me....right?

I have the same problem; it's hard being perfect all of the time.

Anyway though, I might be inclined to take Joe's advice in regard to using pt for the base, then redwood or whatever you decide to use for the seat and back. I am on dial up, so the picture was coming up real slow, but you might even be able to incorporate the same pt for a cleat along the back of the seat back, or something like that, just to visually bring the two together. I have done similar things with outdoor planter boxes, etc., and the contrast can be attractive and add a bit of interest, plus you have the benefit of pt in the splash zones.

oh'mike 11-03-2012 05:17 PM

http://www.gardenbenches.net/images/...artabbench.jpg

oh'mike 11-03-2012 05:19 PM

Nancy---I printed your link---that is a handsome , yet simple design----could be made with little more than a saw and a drill==and a hand held jig saw---

KateSolomon 11-07-2012 06:08 AM

Hello Jack,

I don't think that you have collected sufficient ideas from the above posts, Therefore chose any one of them or for a completely different look mix and match these ideas to get something completely different and unique.

All the best !!! Also please remember to share the picture of whatever you make :)

user1007 11-07-2012 06:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fairview (Post 1043885)
Pictured is an old fashion process of assembling two pieces of lumber with screws. In our high speed society this has been deemed UN-necessary and the quality in a short while after construction will be very evident.

Screws being used today that have threaded shanks will not pull two components tightly together if this procedure isn't followed. Why, the threads keep the 2 pieces from sucking up tight because the screw head is never allowed to do its job. Try the two different methods on a scrap test piece and you'll see the difference.

I would use pocket screws from the underside. And even though more expensive you do not need a lot. Use stainless fasteners as they will not bleed into the wood. Redwood is what I used most when building custom outdoor furniture. Nice cedar would be another option. Teak is expensive and you need carbide or even diamond tools to work with it.


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