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Carla33 12-07-2009 02:30 PM

Sheetrock put on w/o removing door trim
 
I need to figure out how to fill in gaps between existing door trim and sheetrock. The board facing/trim cannot be removed because it would create a huge mess and would be more than I can deal with at this point.

Sheetrock was put up on old walls without removing the door trim/facings. It's not exactly flush with the trim and there are gaps between the top and one side of the trim; both doors to this room are in corners and the sheetrock has been set on top of the wood trim on one side (i.e. the door 'facing' is more narrow on that side by the width of the sheetrock).

I plan to put on new door facing trim that is not as wide in order to accomodate the narrowed corner side (due to the sheetrock sitting on top of the door facing boards). What kind of compound do I need to use to fill in the gaps between the sheetrock & the old board trim? The old board trim/facings are painted; do I need to remove the paint or sand the boards before filling the gaps? I am planning to paint this room and hope to be able to get this patched & sanded sufficiently so it doesn't look like a mess. Help please!:huh:

Every freaking room in this darned old house has former 'remodeling' messes that would give Little Mikie Holmes apoplexy. The above is absolutely not my worst problem. And take it easy on me please. I am an over 60 woman having to do this stuff by myself and I'm not as physically able to do what I used to, but no money to hire a contractor either. Thanks in advance for your help.

RDS 12-07-2009 03:33 PM

Sounds like a real pain in the neck.

Depending on how wide a gap you're trying to hide, maybe just cover it with some right-angle molding. (Find it in the millwork area at your local home improvement store.) Picture L-shaped trim that wraps around the outer edge of the existing trim, widening it a bit so that the edge of the drywall would be covered. One or both legs of the 'L' might have to be trimmed to let it sit properly for your particular situation. And it would look funny if your trim already has right-angle molding on it. But if not, it's a possible solution. You'd need an ability and tools to make miter cuts for the corners. Then just paint it to match the existing trim.

But if your gaps are wider than this kind of trim would cover, you wouldn't really be solving the problem by going this route.

pyper 12-07-2009 05:31 PM

If you have a table saw you could rip 1/2 inch strips of wood (assuming 1/2 inch sheetrock). Then tear the trim off the door and build out the jamb with the half inch strip. Now get some wide casing that will span the gap. If it needs to be wider than that use a 1x6.

If your jams are painted you can put White Lightning caulk in the crack and paint it and you won't see it unless you look really closely. That stuff is pretty amazing.

Oh, and this idea might not work if the doors need to open much more than 90 degrees -- check the locations of your hinge pins.

Carla33 12-07-2009 06:04 PM

Sorry, there is not an edge to go around. Guess I didn' explain this well enough. Figure I also might be overthinking the project. Once I put on a new facing (or even just molding on the board to look like a facing) the area outside of that to 'cover-up' might not be that bad. I'm just trying to figure out the best stuff to fill in with & if I will have to strip the paint off of the boards around the doors. I want to be able to sand, prime & paint and have the appearance (sheetrock/wood) not be too noticeable.

Here's what I've got. The sheetrock is put on next to the door facings, practically flush (actually the sheetrock is a little thicker than the board trim that is around the doors) except for the gaps, on top & one side -think of sitting sheetrock on the top edge of an existing baseboard (i.e. too lazy to take the baseboard off first) -same thing except it's the door facing boards. That doesn't leave any edges around the boards. The other side of the door facing is next to a wall (both of the doors are positioned in corners) and the sheetrock on that opposite wall covers up 3/4" of the facing board. For each door the 'facing' boards of the top and one side are 4-1/2" and the other side only 3-3/4" is visible (because the sheetrock butts to the corner on top of it). I just want to figure out how to fill in gaps & level out the thickness difference, put on new narrower door trims (or fake it with mold), hope the patch job is not too noticeable after the walls are painted and have door trims that look decent.

Carla33 12-07-2009 06:22 PM

Hi Pyper-
I'll look at your White Lightening caulk. I also must not have explained this too well to begin with. I'd love to tear off the old board trim, but I can't without tearing up the sheetrock on the adjacent wall -I really don't want to do that. Furring out would be my choice, but I can't get the top or right side board trims off without making a huge mess of the adjacent wall -the sheetrock on it butts that corner & cover 3/4" of the boards. Will just plain sheetrock filler adhere well enough to the wood board? The doors aren't used much, but I still wouldn't want something that might crack off of the wood. I want to use something that I can sand & get smooth.

Carla33 12-07-2009 06:42 PM

And doors can't open more than 90 deg -they both open directly into their adjacent walls. :wink:

pyper 12-08-2009 01:47 AM

Can you take a picture?

On the one hand you're saying the sheetrock butts the trim, but then you're also saying the sheetrock laps the trim. Does it really do both?

You can still shim it out -- just figure out how much you need to add to bring the trim out in front of the furthest out sheetrock. Then make more shims to go behind the trim on the sheetrock that isn't out that far. Use a utility knife with a sharp blade to free the trim as necessary.

In our living room the entrance door was already in, and I didn't want to take it out, since that would require messing with the vinyl siding. But the new wall was more than 1/2 inch further into the room than the old jambs. So I extended the jambs to fit the new sheetrock surface. I needed three different sizes of wood strips, because the new wall isn't perfectly plumb, and the door isn't set square to it either. So the right side is about 5/8" inch at the bottom and 1/2 inch at the top, while the left side is 3/8 inch top to bottom. The top edge has to navigate the change from 1/2 to 3/8 while the right side has to go from 5/8 to 1/2. I used a varitey of pieces of wood and sanded them to ease the transisitions and then caulked the gaps. Looks pretty good. There was no really good solution.

In a lot of this kind of thing if you try to make things perfect they won't work, so you kind of split the difference, and it looks good enough if you don't measure, or set something plumb or square next to it.

ClemS 12-13-2009 12:03 PM

this is what i'm getting out of the OP. there are two doors, both positioned in the corner of a room. the entire room has original baseboard and casing trim. sheetrock was applied to the walls without removing any of the trim.

naturally the rock laps over the corner casing on the perpendicular wall and is just about flush with top and side casing on the door wall. there are unsightly gaps that the OP wants to eliminate.

there are several course of action here, but a picture of the doors would really help us make a suggestion. if the trim has no profile and is just flatstock, you may be able to get away with just putting a backband on it to make the transition. i don't think "filling" will create the effect you desire, regardless of what you use for fill.:thumbsup:

jaros bros. 12-13-2009 05:06 PM

Mike Holmes would shake his head and tell you to do it right. Take of the trim and put extensions on and new trim. You're creating a situation that will never look right and trying to cover up a joint that will eventually open up over time.

ClemS 12-13-2009 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaros bros. (Post 366184)
Mike Holmes would shake his head and tell you to do it right. Take of the trim and put extensions on and new trim. You're creating a situation that will never look right and trying to cover up a joint that will eventually open up over time.

she's 60. and doesn't have money.

Kevin M. 12-13-2009 06:33 PM

Hi Carla,

Have you checked around to see if you can get some help. Recently, some local governments have received federal funds to help those in situations like yours. You also may try contacting some churches in your neighborhood and inform them you need some help with your house and lack the money to hire the work done. They may have some contractors willing to donate materials and labor to help you out.

At some time or another we all can use a helping hand.

Best regards,

Kevin

jaros bros. 12-13-2009 09:42 PM

The OP already has said she is putting NEW TRIM on the door. She has some money to do this, and this is a DIY site so she has the needed skill to install it. She's not buying a new car or yacht, she's just buying some new door trim so it's not going to break the bank. It even sounds like she is budgeting as she goes on. Whether she does the cover up job or takes off the trim and adds extensions, I don't see how there is really much a price difference or difference in skill level between the two.

ClemS 12-13-2009 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaros bros. (Post 366306)
The OP already has said she is putting NEW TRIM on the door. She has some money to do this, and this is a DIY site so she has the needed skill to install it. She's not buying a new car or yacht, she's just buying some new door trim so it's not going to break the bank. It even sounds like she is budgeting as she goes on. Whether she does the cover up job or takes off the trim and adds extensions, I don't see how there is really much a price difference or difference in skill level between the two.

she is hoping to mud the sheetrock into the existing trim and paint it. i don't know where you read otherwise.

if she had any notion of how interior trim work is handled, she'd never do what she did. too bad she's in a bind now.:(

carpenter377 12-26-2009 02:32 AM

they do make a drywall j channel. It is white in color and can be slid behind the sheetrock. You can find it at any lumber yard.


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