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-   -   see attached photo on exterior stairs...how to do? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/see-attached-photo-exterior-stairs-how-do-156582/)

sierra1 09-12-2012 06:28 AM

see attached photo on exterior stairs...how to do?
 
1 Attachment(s)
can't find info nowhere, nohow, anybody done this?

hammerlane 09-12-2012 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sierra1 (Post 1008270)
can't find info nowhere

Where did you locate the photo at? Looks like a pretty specific project. Doubt anyone but where you found the photo at would have this exacy setup.

joecaption 09-12-2012 06:55 AM

Looks cool but not very safe, legal or functional.

A deck that high needed railings to pass code.

Picture how you would be going up and down those steps.

The bottom one there showing has it level with the grade, 2X 's are not below grade rated, and any composite decking I've delt with states there needs to be at least 12" of free air space under it so it will not mold up.

What your not seeing is the hidden post supporting the deck above that runs through the deck below.

kwikfishron 09-12-2012 07:03 AM

There’s really nothing complicated there, you just treat each of those landings as individual decks.

The first (lowest) one at grade is hopefully sitting on a bed of crushed rock. The second one would require three separate post and footings to support the three corners with the forth corner being supported off the first step. The third looks to be supported with a ledger off the main deck and would require only one additional post and footing.

joecaption 09-12-2012 07:14 AM

Look close at that picture Kwick, the decks in the picture do not make contact.
I do agree with you that the decks below could act as the third post, but that's not what's shown in the picture.

BigJim 09-12-2012 07:27 AM

If it were mine I would cut the point that overlaps to a 45 degree so there would be a step in code instead of stepping off of a point and as said I would install rails to be safe and be in code.

What is it you are wanting to know, how to build, how to be in code or something else.

kwikfishron 09-12-2012 07:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1008279)
Looks cool but not very safe, legal or functional.

A deck that high needed railings to pass code.

Not if it's under 30".

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1008291)
Look close at that picture Kwick, the decks in the picture do not make contact.
I do agree with you that the decks below could act as the third post, but that's not what's shown in the picture.

Hard to tell exactly how they did it with the shadows but I'm sure that one is just sitting on the other even if the support is back there a few inches.

joecaption 09-12-2012 07:31 AM

And what's code on exterier stair width?

DexterII 09-12-2012 07:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jiju1943 (Post 1008295)
If it were mine I would cut the point that overlaps to a 45 degree so there would be a step in code instead of stepping off of a point

Jim's thought on this makes a whole lot of sense. I have seen quite a few steps like that, and while they may have a certain appeal at first glance, they are, in my opinion, impractical and unsafe. But, knock the corners off, as Jim mentioned, and you maintain the basic premise, while building something that is usable.

GBrackins 09-12-2012 08:30 AM

if the clear area of those "steps" is at least 36" x 36" then they are landings and not steps. of course there is a riser height in between them, with most code requirements being a maximum of 7-3/4" (8-1/4" in Massachusetts). There would be no requirement for handrails since you do not have a run of treads or flight with four or more risers.

as kwik stated, guards are only required when the floor of the deck is more than 30" above the adjacent ground.


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