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-   -   Rough opening width for prehung door.. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/rough-opening-width-prehung-door-177997/)

hboogz 04-24-2013 03:05 PM

Rough opening width for prehung door..
 
I have a two very basic questions for all you seasoned vets.

If you're interior framing is 2x4 - what would be reason to choose either 3 1/2 or 4 1/2 door widths when it comes to pre-hung doors ? Also, do you ever frame rough openings for doors using 2x6's ? If so, which widths do you choose ?

Also, I've seen many times folks using stacked 2x4's for the header on a rough opening on a door. is it a better practice or more "refined", to use 2x6 blocking as a header ?

Thanks,

TheEplumber 04-24-2013 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hboogz (Post 1166348)
I have a two very basic questions for all you seasoned vets.

If you're interior framing is 2x4 - what would be reason to choose either 3 1/2 or 4 1/2 door widths when it comes to pre-hung doors ? Also, do you ever frame rough openings for doors using 2x6's ? If so, which widths do you choose ?

Also, I've seen many times folks using stacked 2x4's for the header on a rough opening on a door. is it a better practice or more "refined", to use 2x6 blocking as a header ?

Thanks,

Door casings are sized by the width of your finished wall- so what you call 4.5" would fit a 2x4 wall with 1/2" drywall per side.
As for headers- you need to consider the span length and weight of whats above. For interior nonbearing headers we use 2x4's in my area.

hboogz 04-24-2013 04:43 PM

Thanks for the reply.

I've seen prehung doors come in smaller widths than 4.5" - is that to say that those should only be used when you use 2x4 framing in combination of a finished wall that's smaller than 1/2" on each side.

TheEplumber 04-24-2013 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hboogz (Post 1166398)
Thanks for the reply.

I've seen prehung doors come in smaller widths than 4.5" - is that to say that those should only be used when you use 2x4 framing is used in combination of a finished wall that's smaller than 1/2" on each side.

Yes. Think about the door casing. It will have a gap between the jamb edge and the casing if its not the right width. Or, the opposite effect if the jamb is too wide.
Don't Think about the stud width- Figure the finished wall thickness and order your doors accordingly.

kwikfishron 04-24-2013 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hboogz (Post 1166398)
Thanks for the reply.

I've seen prehung doors come in smaller widths than 4.5"

I can’t say I've ever seen jambs off the shelf any smaller (maybe for a trailer I geuss).

Typically jamb sizes are 4 9/16” and 6 9/16” for either a 2x4 or 2x6 walls respectively.

hboogz 04-24-2013 05:03 PM

Thanks!. When i'm referring to a width of the pre-hung door I'm referencing the width of the jamb that comes pre-assembled with the door. When I read "door casing" i think of the finish moulding (casing) that gets installed around the finish door that covers the gap between sheetrock and the jamb. So ultimately, i want the installed jamb to line up with the end cut of the drywall , when when we put up the finish moulding I nail it into the door jamb (with about 1/8" reveal)

In those cases where the jamb protrudes further out from the drywall, I imagine one way of making it level is with shims and caulk or use a quarterround all around and "step-up" the finished look? Obviously, color matching the quaterround with the door moulding (casing)

Thanks again for the replies and the time spent on answering, i'm sure, very basic questions.

kwikfishron 04-24-2013 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hboogz (Post 1166417)
In those cases where the jamb protrudes further out from the drywall, I imagine one way of making it level is with shims and caulk or use a quarterround all around and "step-up" the finished look? Obviously, color matching the quaterround with the door moulding (casing)

You should "never" allow that to happen.

If there per-hung interior doors it is possible to run the frame (in tact) through a table saw to the width you need but that trick is a little beyond "table saw 101".

Your better off with a smaller jamb size and adding a jamb extension or just make your own jambs.

jagans 04-24-2013 09:11 PM

Jambs for pre-hing doors are usually adjustable. The casing is already attached to the jamb and one side slides into the other. You leave the bracing on till you hang the door plumb and level, then install the other side.

hand drive 04-24-2013 09:54 PM

I've used shims (lattice strips or ripped 1/4" stock) behind pre hung casing in shed type situations with peg board and also remodeling where the wall goes from plaster down to drywall and the jambs are to wide on both sides...

you can rip cut the part of the jamb that slips in later, to fit in a less than standard 4 5/8" jamb wall. be sure and block shim intermittently (especially behind hinges) between backside of jamb and framing member and nail both sides of the pre hung jamb to the block shims.

woodworkbykirk 04-24-2013 10:20 PM

most prehung's are garbage these days.. the hinges are mortised extremely poorly and the headers arent cut the correct length to keep a consistant margin around hte door. the last time i hung prehungs i spent well over an hour fiddling with it to have correct margins and have it operate properly..

when i hang doors i build my own jambs then hange them. last friday i hung a set of doubles. when i was ready to actually hang it, it took no more than 20 minutes to have everything right. just my two cents

as for the rough opening.. the width of the opening should be 2" wider than the frame of the door.. i.e 30" door gets a 32 " r.o

TheEplumber 04-24-2013 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1166563)
Jambs for pre-hing doors are usually adjustable. The casing is already attached to the jamb and one side slides into the other. You leave the bracing on till you hang the door plumb and level, then install the other side.

Maybe so in your neck of the woods. Not here. Casing is sold separate and jambs are one piece.

kwikfishron 04-24-2013 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1166563)
Jambs for pre-hing doors are usually adjustable. The casing is already attached to the jamb and one side slides into the other. You leave the bracing on till you hang the door plumb and level, then install the other side.

:eek: What :eek:

Must be one of those regional things I guess. :wink:

hboogz 04-25-2013 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk (Post 1166635)
most prehung's are garbage these days.. the hinges are mortised extremely poorly and the headers arent cut the correct length to keep a consistant margin around hte door. the last time i hung prehungs i spent well over an hour fiddling with it to have correct margins and have it operate properly..

when i hang doors i build my own jambs then hange them. last friday i hung a set of doubles. when i was ready to actually hang it, it took no more than 20 minutes to have everything right. just my two cents

as for the rough opening.. the width of the opening should be 2" wider than the frame of the door.. i.e 30" door gets a 32 " r.o

This is exactly what I've come across. I quickly learned, as another post suggested, I plumb and install hinge side first of a prehung, then shin the latch side to measure. But I've found this really time consuming. What kind of lumber do you use for building your jambs?

I need a job site table saw. I'm not in the trades enough to justify a $300 TS, do I've seen a ryobi at HD going for $129. In this case, I get what I pay for or is this surprisingly a "good" deal?

hboogz 04-25-2013 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 1166649)
:eek: What :eek:

Must be one of those regional things I guess. :wink:

There are adjustable jambs on wooden prehung doors? I've seen adjustable metal jambs.

princelake 04-25-2013 06:34 PM

you get what you pay for with the ryobi table saw but its not bad but the average homeowner.

when i hang prehung doors i stick shim in the top and level up my header. lots of times in basement and old homes its out of level and i cut the bottom of the jamb so when it stands in the opening its level. then i skim my hinge side, i then hang my door and shim the latch side. then finally nail on the casing and stops.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Quick-Doo...-201/202366685

do some youtube searches on this product to hang your door quickly.


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