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Old 07-03-2014, 08:03 PM   #1
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


I have an addition which has a section of the rim joist and plate are in need of replacement. One section is on the gable end and I am fine with jacking up the joists a bit to do the repair on this side. No problem there. The problem is that the other section is parallel to the joists. My plan is to install blocking from the rim joist to the next joist every 24". Running this blocking (2x10) so it is actually under the bottom wall plate. Then I can run a beam under the blocking and, using the house jacks I have, jack up that side enough to replace the damaged rim joist and plate. I am doing this in a crawl space. I just dont see ant other way to jack up the load bearing side of this addition. I have 18' to replace on the load bearing wall side. Any thoughts out there?

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Old 07-03-2014, 09:30 PM   #2
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


You might help the rest of us out to understand this better by adding a picture, or a diagram.

But it sounds like you may have the plan correct.


ED

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Old 07-03-2014, 10:17 PM   #3
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


OK....lets see if I did this right....here's a diagram. Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.-scannedimage.jpg The right side where the repair needs to be done is a load bearing wall.

Last edited by Indyandy; 07-03-2014 at 10:19 PM.
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Old 07-04-2014, 06:48 AM   #4
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


I'd want to see what you mean by load bearing wall - all the way to the roof. And see whether there is parts of the house that settled.

Your blocking idea is iffy to me. The blocks will be attached to single floor joist and it will be doing all the bearing work. You are creating a cantilever on a single joist. Even though the underlayment siding (plywood or t&g) is also holding up the wall, I wouldn't guess on the single floor joist helping to bear the weight.

What is true would be working from outside, remove enough finish siding, install a header (a beam) on the wall studs, and repair the foundation plates and rims in sections. 8' double 2x6 supporting header and 4' sections would be safe enough, given average 2 story house and working time.
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Old 07-04-2014, 08:01 AM   #5
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


Here is another diagram
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.-scannedimage.jpg  
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Old 07-04-2014, 08:08 AM   #6
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


Yeah........I was having the same thoughts. I am not real comfortable with my course of action here so that's why I am seeking some advice.This is a single story addition and by load bearing I mean this is a outside wall supporting the roof trusses. The wall has dropped about an inch due to the deterioration from rot or possibly termite damage.
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Old 07-04-2014, 08:10 AM   #7
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


Going to post some picture's here shortly.
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Old 07-04-2014, 08:35 AM   #8
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


Maybe you could sister a new joist on the next joist in, and then transfer the load there until you can replace the rotted one, and put it back together.

ED
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Old 07-04-2014, 09:11 AM   #9
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


I'm generally skeptical that jacking a house is DIY work, but anyway, if I were being paid to do it, and the goal was to get the entire addition level, I would run a few perpendicular beams perpendicular to the joists, the full size of the addition, if necessary poking holes in the foundation. Jack the entire addition up slightly above the desired elevation, repair foundation and rim in sections, lower house back onto new sections, remove beams, then repair foundation and rim further, tying it all together.

That's well beyond normal DIY scope, and I would hire a house lifter with hydraulics to do the lifting. Jacking a house is risky work, and it's also not clear to me that the piecemeal, wall-by-wall approach will give you a level and flat result.
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Old 07-04-2014, 09:14 AM   #10
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


if that is a bearing wall a single band would not be there only. it would be a double band or already have blocking every 16" or so back to the next joist in just like you show doing. a single band will buckle under a bearing wall and will not suffice. is it a gable wall instead?
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Old 07-04-2014, 11:46 AM   #11
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


This is a pic from the corner looking down the wall. The wall is 18 feet long. ATTACH]86864[/ATTACH]
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Old 07-04-2014, 11:49 AM   #12
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


It is the wall with the door in it that has the rotted rim joist and plate. Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.-plate2.jpg
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Old 07-04-2014, 11:56 AM   #13
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


And Hand Drive, it IS a single plate with no blocking.I know what you are saying but it was not built correctly to start with. The rim joist is starting to roll out at the bottom. The wall has sunk about an inch so far making the door diffacult to open and close. There was issues with water in the crawl space but the drainage issues have been corrected. I am fairly well versed in carpentry but this is an area where I have had little experience. If it were a gable end, no problem but this wall has me stumped as far as the best and safest way to jack it up and do the repair.
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Old 07-04-2014, 01:37 PM   #14
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


I wouldn't try to raise it back to some correct level. It is addition to a log house? Roof is also tied. I think you may have more trouble moving exterior structures that were built at different times but may have settled together. It'd be cheaper to rebuild the whole thing than hiring professional jackers.
Good thing is it is a small area. I'd remove the siding and support it from outside, wall or the rafters. Reframe the door and get the gutters as far away from the foundation.
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Old 07-04-2014, 04:28 PM   #15
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Replacing Rim Joist and Plate.


Yes, it is an addition to a log cabin. In order to replace the damaged rim joist and plate it has to be raised. Settling isnt a concern either with the addition or the cabin itself. Foundations are as level and plumb as they were 20 years ago.THe siding has to be removed in order to tie the bottom wall plate and rim joist together. A complete rebuild isnt necessary either.

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