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Old 09-06-2006, 06:03 AM   #1
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


I have an OLD built in gas counter top stove (with cubbards under neath) and a seperate built in oven (also with cubbards). One of the gas burner units is broken and can not be repaired or replaced and the oven has a gas leak and the piolit wont stay lit due to a missing piece on the temp. knob. They are beside each other and removing them will take out a good chunk of cubbards and very little actual counter space. How do I go about replacing both units with a single "regular" gas range and still leave my kitchen looking decent. I am disabled but and still pretty handy and will have help from my teenage son. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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Old 09-06-2006, 08:57 AM   #2
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


Again, pictures are worth thousand words. I don't know if you have the capability but posting a picture would help to determine what can be done.

You will probably have to remove both stove and oven then reconfigure the cabinet to accept a range/stove combo and then fill in the cabinets and install a new countertop.

Dave.

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Old 09-06-2006, 08:02 PM   #3
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


Dave is right, pictures or a lot more information would help. I subbed for several appliance companies and have done this many times so I'll try to give you a little help. First many companies make cook tops and built in ovens that are designed as direct, or very little cutting replacements, this would probably be the cheapest in the long run. But if you are determined to put in a stove/oven combo you might consider a slide-in range if your cook top opening is close to the size required by a slide-in range. Using a slide-in range will eliminate having to cut the counter top back splash and removing the cabinet (it can usually be cut for a slide in). But if you are intent on a free-standing range you'll need to remove the cabinet that the cook top is in, assuming that you're going to put the stove in the same location. Flooring or lack there of, can also be an issue when removing a cabinet. Now I have seen cook tops that straddled two cabinets, if this is the case you're looking at lots of work and I would recommend the first option I suggested. A standard free-standing range is 30 inches but you can get them in 20", 24", 36" and 42". The sizes other than 30" are usually more expensive, so if your base cabinet is anything other than a 30" your either going to have to buy an odd sized range, remove another cabinet or use filler strips (probably won't match existing). If your countertop is Corian, granite or anything other than a standard formica you will need special tools to cut it. Assuming that you have an optimal situation, 30" cabinet, cook top cut into only one cabinet, formica counter top, etc., cutting a standard formica countertop can be difficult without removing it (the back splash). You'll have to figure that one out yourself. When you cut a formica counter top you will be left with two exposed ends that can soak up water, swell and look bad. There are iron on end caps, but depending on the age and shape of your counter you may not find a good match, you can use something similar as it should mostly be hidden by the range. Another consideration might be an electric outlet, most new ranges require an outlet for the electronic ignition and depending on how old your old appliances are you may not have one. If you are able to do it your self make sure you terminate the unused gas line for the built-in oven by properly capping it not just shutting off the gas valve if there is one, also replace all flexible gas line connectors, do NOT reuse the old ones. For the empty space left by the built-in oven I have made, TV nooks, Microwave nooks, shelves etc., use your imagination. I don't know your level of experience but gas and electric can be dangerous so call in a pro if your not sure about something, it's not worth the risk. If your up to challenge and have the necessary skills, I hope this helps and good luck to you.

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Old 10-06-2006, 06:46 AM   #4
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


I also have a built-in oven to remove. We are replacing our 30" built-in oven and cooktop with a standard 30" range. We are also having the countertop replaced so mounting should not be an issue. However, I do not see how the present oven is mounted. Is there a typical mounting strategy or strategies? Cooktop is already out (simply lifted out - very easy). I just need to remove the oven.

Another question: We are replacing electric units with a gas range. A plumber is doing the gas, but I suppose I will probably need a 120 volt feed to the range for clock, pilot, etc. I can just use one leg of the existing 220, right? If so, which color wires would I use?

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Old 10-06-2006, 07:29 AM   #5
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


I have never had to remove such a stove or for that matter installed one but my guess would be that if you open the door there are screws that go into the cabinets on either side at the door opening.

Yes you will need a 120 volt connection for your new stove. The colors to use are either white/red or white/black. It is still advisable to check continuity to make sure that they are hooked up properly. Never assume anything.

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Old 10-06-2006, 12:59 PM   #6
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


Open your oven and look at the model plate for it. Write down the make and model. Look for the manufacturer's web site and find the installation manual. Most are available online.

If you can't find it, try this. The oven door will remove first. There will be trim that must be removed to the left and right of the oven seal, remove it. Mostly it lifts off, sometimes its clipped in.

Under that will be the attaching screws that hold the oven in. This is a two man job.

TURN THE POWER OFF FIRST!

The electrical connections will be behind the oven in the cabinet, and one person will most likely have to hold the oven while the other disconnects the wires.
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Old 10-06-2006, 01:30 PM   #7
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


One thing that I forgot to mention is if you use the 220 volt wire to remember to go into the breaker box and remove the double pole breaker it is attached to and replace it with a maximum 20 amp single pole.
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Old 03-16-2008, 09:50 AM   #8
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


Ladies/Gentlemen and lurkers...

We recently had a fire (my daughter ran the microwave with nothing in it for 13 minutes and it caught fire - it's a long story...) but the microwave was a combo unit - tied to a perfectly good oven ;( . So now we're appliance shopping! This time I have decided to split the microwave and oven in case it (we have another fire) happens again.

The original combo unit was powered by a single 220v circuit. I've since added an additional 110v outlet for the NEW microwave (and a new shelf to hold it up) and now I'm installing the builtin wall oven. I've looked at all the manuals, labels, stickers, etc. etc. to see if the new oven is 220v but I'm getting conflicting answers. The GE website shows this:
http://products.geappliances.com/Pro...&SKU=JT912SKSS

The installation manual says this: "You must use a three-wire, single-phase A.C. 208Y/120 Volt or 240/120 Volt, 60 hertz electrical system."

My question(s) is/are simple. Can I wire the new oven into the old 220v circuit? or was the old 220v circuit designed to handle both the microware and oven at the same time and now I only need two 110v outlets for each appliance? and does each appliance need to be on their own seperate circuits? ...and if so what guage wire should the circuits be? (10/2) ...and, and, and....

...and please don't say "it depends"

Thanks profusely!
John Stinnett
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Old 06-01-2008, 04:44 PM   #9
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


I am in the process of removing a hob and built-in oven, to replace with a freestanding electric cooker.

Does anyone have any advice on how to neatly cut out the formica countertop area beneath the tiling on the back wall? We will retain and use the rest of the countertop with cap-ends put on each of the exposed cut sides.

Cheers for any advice.
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:41 PM   #10
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Replacing countertop stove and built in oven


I have a 30" cabinet that has a countertop gas burners. Almost like the picture above except where they have an oven i have a cabinet and mine is gas not electric. I would like to cut the countertop(laminate) to remove the cabinet and take out the countertop burners and put a range in its place. My question is what is the best type of saw to use to cut the laminate? I probably will have to cut from the top of the countertop and i know it will be a pain as i near the wall. So what are the recommended saws and blades that would be best for this job. I know cutting from the top may cause the laminate to splinter is there any ideas on how to prevent this also . I hope to have a pictue of this project soon.

Thanks for all advice and help

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