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Old 05-30-2007, 07:55 AM   #1
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Replacing broken floor boards...


I have an old house (1920) with tonge and groove pine hardwood floors. In some areas the boards are very badly checked.
In other areas, there are holes where the steam pipes used to run (I removed those) and I'd like to replace the boards. What's the best way to do this? Thanks in advance.

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Old 05-30-2007, 09:32 AM   #2
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Replacing broken floor boards...


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Originally Posted by gshock View Post
I have an old house (1920) with tonge and groove pine hardwood floors. In some areas the boards are very badly checked.
In other areas, there are holes where the steam pipes used to run (I removed those) and I'd like to replace the boards. What's the best way to do this? Thanks in advance.
Generally, the best method is to:

a.) Match the boards. If you cannot locate a good stock match, a method used is to remove some floor boards from a closet or other area in the home and use these to replace your damaged baors in the highly visible locations in the home. Then go back and use stock that is not a perfect match, but the best that you can find and then install these in the closet or other floor areas where you removed the replacement boards from.

b.) Staining the new stock. You can try to do test samples by mixing or combining stock. This is if you are using new stock to replace the damaged boards and are in need of matching the stain shades and color.

c.) You always want to remove the boards and replace them by 'staggering' the boards, if they area next to eachother. Never do you want the ends to match side by side, or you will end up with a 'patchwork' look - that makes it obvious that you replaced the area.
This may require you to remove large sections and cut and re-install some good lengths in order to get the proper staggered appearance in the actual replacement location. You can also accomplish this by 'prying' up a board length on one end and ''cross cutting'' it straight at a joist point, in oder to get your staggered arrangement....

d.) Sanding: Even if you install replacement stock that you stole out of your closet floor, you may have to sand the surface thickness down to match the surrounding floor thickness, if the two are not the same. You would have to carefully blend these together and then do the re-staining process, being careful to match the color (as listed on b.).


These area just a few tips off the top of my head. I'm sure that there are some useful tips others can offer, especially the guys/gals that door flooring ''full-time'' for a living....

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Old 05-30-2007, 02:05 PM   #3
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Replacing broken floor boards...


Atl.WB - thanks for the tips. I appreciate the feedback on all my posts. Specifics though, how do you get a tonge and groove board out if it's sandwiched in between two other boards? Then, how do you get the new one back in? Do you cut the lip off one side so that you can slide the tongue into the existing board and then drop it in? Secure it with brads?
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Old 05-30-2007, 02:18 PM   #4
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Replacing broken floor boards...


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Atl.WB - thanks for the tips. I appreciate the feedback on all my posts. Specifics though, how do you get a tonge and groove board out if it's sandwiched in between two other boards? Then, how do you get the new one back in? Do you cut the lip off one side so that you can slide the tongue into the existing board and then drop it in? Secure it with brads?
The links below will help walk you thru it all:

http://pages.areaguides.com/ubuild/P...dwoodFloor.htm

http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/Dumm...e/id-2492.html

http://www.extremehowto.com/xh/artic...ticle_id=60180
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Old 05-30-2007, 02:54 PM   #5
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Replacing broken floor boards...


Perfect! That's exactly what I was picturing, but I wanted to make sure. Thanks for the help!!!

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