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Old 05-27-2011, 09:29 AM   #1
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Replace Wooden colums


What is the best way to ensure when cutting the new round column it will flush when installed?

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Old 05-27-2011, 01:15 PM   #2
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What is the best way to ensure when cutting the new round column it will flush when installed?
Measuring accurately, laying out the cut and cutting with precision.
Realize porches are sloped to the stairs so you might need a slightly angled cut to lay flat on the base.
Practicing on scrap wood will help to get the angle correct.
Ron

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Old 05-27-2011, 01:58 PM   #3
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Guess I should have asked this question diffenently, what type of saw would you suggest? Hand, skill, reciprocationg? Column OD is 8", my concern is best method of keeping saw squar during cut?
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:05 PM   #4
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Guess I should have asked this question diffenently, what type of saw would you suggest? Hand, skill, reciprocationg? Column OD is 8", my concern is best method of keeping saw squar during cut?
If the column is not tapered, I would use a circular saw. The shoe will ride on the column. It will help if you have someone on each end slowly rolling or rotating the column so the cut is continuous.
Actually, I would use the circular saw even if it was tapered, you would just need to set the angle to compensate for the taper.
Ron

Last edited by Ron6519; 05-27-2011 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 05-27-2011, 03:06 PM   #5
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Eight inches is too big for a Skil saw, and too large for the average power miter saw. A properly sharpened hand crosscut saw would work fine, probably better than a reciprocating saw, which tends to wander in my experience.
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Old 05-27-2011, 05:51 PM   #6
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Eight inches is too big for a Skil saw, and too large for the average power miter saw. A properly sharpened hand crosscut saw would work fine, probably better than a reciprocating saw, which tends to wander in my experience.
Wow. A guy who actually knows what a hand held crosscut saw is? I figured mine were antiques since the batteries ran out. Can you even buy them anymore? Do they come with instruction manuals or warranties? Neon plastic handles?

Of course with only eight inches to go through I would still use a good sharp one.

If you want to look really cool? And are into impressive garage ornamentation? Buy a Japanese crosscut saw. Think of a long sushi knife with special teeth.

Last edited by user1007; 05-27-2011 at 06:10 PM.
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Old 05-27-2011, 07:03 PM   #7
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Indeed, I have a full set of handsaws, both crosscut and rip, and a flush cut hand saw as well. Course I myself am an antique, so that probably explains it. The Japanese saws operate as pull saws, I believe they are known as dozuki saws, and a good craftsman can work wonders with them. I actually use my hand saws quite frequently, especially on long pieces of wood, in awkward places, or occasionally to complete cuts made with a skil saw.

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