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-   -   To Replace Doors and Trim or Not (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/replace-doors-trim-not-94657/)

Ptron 02-05-2011 08:49 PM

To Replace Doors and Trim or Not
 
Iím fishing for advice because Iím agonizing over replacing all the doors and trim in my house vs. all the other things I could do with the 3 to 4 grand itís going to cost me to do so. I have extra wide jams (5 1/4") so those big box cheap stock doors aren't really an option and I don't really dont trust them not to be cheap junk anyways.

Here's a little sampling of what I'm up against.

Chunks and scratches....

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...us/Trim2-1.jpg


Gouging...

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...us/Trim1-1.jpg

Previous owners attempt at stripping and my own ( I knew it would be a lot of work but man it was ridiculous so I've pretty much abandoned that idea)

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...us/Trim3-1.jpg

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...us/Trim4-1.jpg

...and more scratches...

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...us/Trim5-1.jpg

Not to mention a lot of slopped paint and a couple warped doors. All the trim, including the casing would be a relatively cheap 7 or 8 hundred bucks so I can stomach that but I the new pre-hung doors priced out at something like around 300 each (poplar, unfinished). I don't know, this place ain't exactly a mansion either way, but you see the pictures, that stuff looks pretty craptastic.

Ron6519 02-06-2011 08:12 AM

Somebody had some big dogs. If you're willing to abandon the stained doors and convert them to a painted door, there's no reason I can see that they can't be salvaged. It will require a fair amount of work on your part, filling and sanding the doors though.
Ron

TheDoorGuy 02-06-2011 08:36 AM

Wow, you have taken on quite a challenge there!
Again, if you don't mind giving up the stained doors you could look into moulded interior doors.
This is link to a Los Angeles based manufacturer that makes a door style called the "Crossmore"
that might lend itself to your interior look....Kind of a Craftsman style.
http://www.tmcobb.com/int_craft_molded.html
These doors or something similar will be available through a local door shop...Not the big box.
Most styles come in hollow core or solid core. Prehung doors can be ordered with the 5 1/4" wall
thickness that you mentioned. Look at a moulding catalog to see if there is something more interesting
than the 2 or three styles usually stocked at HD.
Cost will be way less than what you were quoted for the poplar doors. But again, they can only be painted.

Good luck!

Ptron 02-06-2011 09:37 AM

Thanks for the replies. I should have mentioned in th OP that I have a pretty strong preference for stained wood but maybe I should be a little more open minded about that. In the end though, I think the savings would have to be quite a lot for me to give that up.

I think if I could get the doors completely stripped (I have another thread asking about services that will do that), fix only the really bad chips, and sand a bit they would look pretty decent. They would just have a lot of character...as opposed to the way too much character they have right now, if you know what I mean.

TheDoorGuy 02-06-2011 09:48 AM

Gotcha,...Your doors are old enough so that they will be constructed of solid wood...No veneers.
This means that you can probably have them stripped without fear of damaging the surfaces further.
Lot's of labor involved but with patience you will be able to keep the soulful character of your original home.

DG

tcleve4911 02-06-2011 10:44 AM

A friend of mine refinishes furniture.
I went to his "shop" (basement) one day to check out his operation.
There were no dipping vats, gallons of 5F5, rags or any of that stuff.
Just scrapers.........
Really sharp paint scrapers........
Lots of scrapers...........
All sizes, shapes and styles
Some homemade, others like you'd see at the paint stores.

He was working on a very old chest of drawers.
He would scrape off the finish right down to the wood with amazing ease.

It made for quiet work with classical music playing in the backround......

A quick sanding with 220, a quick rinse with denatured alcohol, and he had this old beat up piece ready for its new life.

Try it on one of the doors....even one that was "chemically" stripped

ChrWright 02-06-2011 11:02 AM

Having a professional company strip and refinish them (in a stained finish) in my area would run around $225 per door.

An alternative we've used before is to leave the jambs and trim (or in your case selectively replace the casings in the worst shape) and have new doors mortised to the existing jambs. My lumber yard will match a new door slab to the mortises of an existing one for about $25 per door.

In your case, the profile is not something standard so matching it would be relatively expensive. If you could live with a six panel door, in poplar or white pine, you might get away with around $125-$150 per door but you'd still have to stain and finish them.

Ptron 02-06-2011 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcleve4911 (Post 585704)
A friend of mine refinishes furniture.
I went to his "shop" (basement) one day to check out his operation.
There were no dipping vats, gallons of 5F5, rags or any of that stuff.
Just scrapers.........
Really sharp paint scrapers........
Lots of scrapers...........
All sizes, shapes and styles
Some homemade, others like you'd see at the paint stores.

He was working on a very old chest of drawers.
He would scrape off the finish right down to the wood with amazing ease.

It made for quiet work with classical music playing in the backround......

A quick sanding with 220, a quick rinse with denatured alcohol, and he had this old beat up piece ready for its new life.

Try it on one of the doors....even one that was "chemically" stripped

Really, That works? Interesting. I've got nothing to lose. I'll give it a shot.

When I was trying to strip before, I was trying to do everything, and do it in place. I started out with denatured alcohol and eventually moved on to more hardcore stuff. I guess since at this point Iíd just be doing the doors and jams (the trim just isnít worth it, plus Iíve already pulled most of it of and some of it didnít fare well in the removal process) maybe I should revisit this.

Question: the doors are pine and so was the trim. I was going to replace the trim in hardwood, possibly maple, so they would handle abuse a little better next time around. Itís a couple hundred dollars difference. Any problems aesthetic or otherwise with mixing like that?

Jackofall1 02-06-2011 11:39 AM

First thing you need to do is get rid of or better train the animals that did that to the doors and trim in the first place.

ChrWright 02-06-2011 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ptron (Post 585724)
Question: the doors are pine and so was the trim. I was going to replace the trim in hardwood, possibly maple, so they would handle abuse a little better next time around. It’s a couple hundred dollars difference. Any problems aesthetic or otherwise with mixing like that?[/FONT][/COLOR]

You'll have a much harder time getting the color to match by mixing wood specie. Pine absorbs stain very easily while the maple will take many coats to get it as dark. If you can get the color right, the grain difference will still be slightly noticeable as well.

Ptron 02-06-2011 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChrWright (Post 585712)
Having a professional company strip and refinish them (in a stained finish) in my area would run around $225 per door.

An alternative we've used before is to leave the jambs and trim (or in your case selectively replace the casings in the worst shape) and have new doors mortised to the existing jambs. My lumber yard will match a new door slab to the mortises of an existing one for about $25 per door.

In your case, the profile is not something standard so matching it would be relatively expensive. If you could live with a six panel door, in poplar or white pine, you might get away with around $125-$150 per door but you'd still have to stain and finish them.

Thanks. Also good stuff. I've got absolutely no problem staining and finishing. I was going to do that anyway. Well, I already pulled down all the casing except for the stuff inside the closets so that's kind of a done deal. I would replace all the doors, every one save one has something wrong with it ( there are only 7 ), so matching isn't an issue although I must admit six panel wouldn't be my first choice. I tend to like the flat panel two-panel or shaker more.

I wouldn't mind hanging new doors on the old frame. I've done it before. I would still have the issue of some of the frames being damaged but I suppose that's a significantly smaller problem.

Ptron 02-06-2011 11:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackofall1 (Post 585730)
First thing you need to do is get rid of or better train the animals that did that to the doors and trim in the first place.

Previous owners.

Ptron 02-06-2011 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChrWright (Post 585731)
You'll have a much harder time getting the color to match by mixing wood specie. Pine absorbs stain very easily while the maple will take many coats to get it as dark. If you can get the color right, the grain difference will still be slightly noticeable as well.

Understood. I wonder if the two tone thing might actually look kind of cool? Otherwise perhaps one could use a darker stain on the maple to achieve a similar color?

Ptron 02-07-2011 01:09 PM

Slightly OT question: I noticed when I was pulling up the old trim that it scratches or marks with the slightest of contact with the pry bar. Is this because of the pine is soft or the shellac is easily damged. I ask not because I'm worried about hurting the trim but because I want whatever I replace it with to be more durable.

Ron6519 02-07-2011 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ptron (Post 586444)
Slightly OT question: I noticed when I was pulling up the old trim that it scratches or marks with the slightest of contact with the pry bar. Is this because of the pine is soft or the shellac is easily damged. I ask not because I'm worried about hurting the trim but because I want whatever I replace it with to be more durable.

It would help if you posted pictures.
Ron


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