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Old 08-06-2008, 06:22 AM   #16
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


from the picture where the paint is removed yes It looks as tho the rot isn't that bad, but from what your saying it's beyond that on either side by 6". yes I would agree that the product that I suggested would not be the best repair.
Solid wood doors are still available today, but are pricey. around the area of 800.00 for a Doug fir door. and thermo-tru is a good door with a life time warranty.
price depends on the style you pick.
As for your situation, your repair could be done by an experienced carpenter but it going to labor intensive. it appears as tho your vinyl siding was installed over the original siding that was on the house.
which is why the brick mould around the door was padded out about 1-1/8" more then normal. and is why they covered over the storm door Z bars and cut or covered the threshold horns on either side of the door.
I am curious why they made the brick mould trim around the door so wide.( pilaster's?)
If I was doing the repair I would pull the door out. remove the threshold reinstall the door and rework the brick mould around the door to make it more appealing. for example. 2-1/4" brick mould have the threshold horns come out even with the sides of the brick mould. and then install a pair of pilaster's on both sides of the brick mould padded out so they would sit on top of the mould by about a 1/4" and which would bring them out past the J channel of the siding. and add some sort of cross head above the door.
labor intensive! that's why your contractor was suggesting a new door. the cost of what seams to be a simple repair would probably turn you off. and with a new door they would be a lot more energy efficient, compared to the drafts that you get from the weather striping that is on the door now.
BOB

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Old 08-06-2008, 08:44 AM   #17
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


Bob, I think you are correct regarding the siding - there was some kind of decorative thing around the door that just got flashed over which accounts for the weird dimensions.

Still confused!

The contractor I originally spoke to just quoted me $1,200 for the "new deal" and $510 of that is for the fibreglass door, the rest is labor.

I met with another carpenter this morning who also thought that was the best option, but he said if I really wanted to keep my door he could indeed replace the sill, but the job would not be quite as good for some reason, problably because of the reasons Bob alluded to. He said that would run about $300 depending on what is revealed.

Regarding the door, he said if it came to it, Therma Tru was the way to go, and whatever door I bought he would hang - so the price could be anything I guess depending on what I pick.

So, I think Bob is leaning toward the total replacement, and DM is leaning toward replacing the sill? I should flip a coin!

This is getting confusinger and confusinger!
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Old 08-06-2008, 09:05 AM   #18
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it all depends on your budget. if your planing on staying in the house then I would recommend a new door. they are more energy efficient and less maintenance. but your also going to get involved with a new storm door, the newer door's are 1/2" smaller in there width. because they incorporate the door stop into there jambs there for giving you a 1/2" small opening from jamb to jamb. and with the brick mould applied your storm door opening is going to be that 1/2" smaller.
if you do decide to replace the threshold as the other contractors stated there could be problems arising latter on down the road which the installer would feel he would be responsible for, and feels it would not be worth the aggravation, so he feels to just change the door being it is 50 years old anyway. any other questions I'll be here good luck with your decision BOB
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Old 08-06-2008, 10:45 AM   #19
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


Thanks. I'll print this out and discuss w/ my Wife and come to a decision. I don't mind spending the $$$ if is is indeed a better decision and better job. I just didn't want to get burned as I don't know much about this stuff at all.

It's a bit clearer now, though. Thanks

Stay tuned for my new thread asking about reinforcing the jambs to strengthen them. Usually, its the jambs that give in when kicked, and a job like this would provide a good chance to address that.
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Old 08-06-2008, 05:28 PM   #20
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its funny you mentioned that I had some one kick in my door while I was working on the house next door that we purchased. I herd this big bang while I was sitting in my office next door, I walked outside on the front porch and look over at the house and did not see anything unusual, so went back inside . about 15 minutes later I had to go next door to measure something and decided to use the back door of the house, when I noticed the door was kicked in. jamb was split and My 5-1/4" custom casing was pulled away from the wall. So what I did was to have my AC contractor bend me up a piece of heavy gauge sheet metal about 40" long 4-9/16" wide with a 90 degree bend to cover the inside jamb. I used guerilla glue to glue the split jamb back into position and clamped it until dry.
then I installed the sheet metal into position and marked out for the dead bolt . cut the slot for the dead bolt and reinstalled the sheetmetal blocket and shimmed it tight to the jamb. then got some #12 x 4-1/2" wood screws and drilled them into the jamb and and into the jack studs. Its not going anywhere now. And that was a 1-3/4 solid fir door.
Just thought I save you a post God Luck. BOB
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Old 08-06-2008, 10:11 PM   #21
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


Too late, I already posted, but that's exactly what I'm talking about! I could give this to my carpenter and let him work it! There are products on the market, but your solution will do the trick for less $$$.

Its funny, when I mention this stuff to the carpenters I get weird looks, like no one ever asks about this stuff. Doesn't it make sense to address when the door is all exposed? (Makes sense to me)
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Old 11-06-2008, 01:45 PM   #22
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


Yours looks the same as mine, even the same colour! I scraped everything down, filled it with some plastic wood filler that I found in the shed, primed and painted. But now I can't remember how to put the weather stripping thing back and I filled the nail holes so I can't match them! I'm ready to give up and sell "this old house"!
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:54 PM   #23
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


I just read this thread because I'm having the exact same problem. I'd like to know what you decided to do and how it turned out. (and pictures!!!). Also, how much did it cost.

If you haven't fixed it yet, I'd suggest buying an aluminum sill guard (I'm not sure that's the correct name). But anyway, its a piece of aluminum that is "L" shaped so it goes on top of your sill and bends over the edge. You'll have to cut the sides to fit exactly between the door jambs. It basicly serves as an umbrella to keep any water off the wood.

IF you refer to the picture below, just imagine that the paper is aluminum, and that the top edge goes UNDER the threshold.

So you would do this:

1) Remove whatever threshold is in place

2) Make a teplate of the shape of your door jambs as I did in the picture below.

3) Trace shape onto aluminum, cut with hacksaw.

4) Remove all soft damaged wood.

5) Fill surface with "bondo-like" filler. I was thinking of using tile mastic, but anything that fills the gaps and sticks is good. I'm thinking tile mastic might be the best because it is made to stick tile to wood. You want a solid bond so when you step on this threshoild, you have full contact with the sill. Leave about 1/2 inch around the edges bare. You want to create a coating that rises slightly above the surface of the sill so you can mash the aluminum piece into it.

6) Put a thick bead of calk (1/4 in maybe more) around the edges while the mastic is still wet. Now you should have a nice thick coating of goo everywhere.

7) Press aluminum piece into goo, and screw down.

8) Clean-up any goo from around edges

9) Install a "saddle" type threshold that goes over the aluminum so water will run off the door, onto the saddle threshold, then onto the aluminum piece.

10) calk the edges around the saddle threshold.

There should be no way for any water to ever touch your threshold again.

And this solution should cost about $40

Now if anyone knows where I can find this aluminum "Sill guard," please let me know. I've seen them at home depot, but they were only about 5 inches wide. I need a 7 inch version. I may try making my saddle threshold wider so I can use the short one.
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Old 09-01-2009, 01:54 PM   #24
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Replace door sill = Need new door?


Take your paper measurements to an alumnin siding contractor and have him make one for you. I had to replace 2 Therma Tru french door units last month that had both leaked at the jams and rotted subfloor and 1 joist. I even had him put a 1/2" lip up on the inside section of the pan and left it long enough that I could bend the ends up to go behind the new door jams. The entire unit sits in the pan and " should never leak" The old ones leaked through the joined brick mold. I used solid plastic/pvc brick mold on the new units so shouldn't have that problem again.

Therma Tru would not stand behind the doors even tough they were only 13 years old!!! They fell apart when I attempted to take them out. Rotted jams and sill both.

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