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Old 06-29-2009, 04:34 PM   #1
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Repairing Trim damage


I am in the process of repainting my exterior window frames. In one, about four feet off the ground, I've found holes in both sides of the frame. The holes are about two inches high and half an inch wide, and the deep -- seems to be all the way through the wood. The wood for an eigth of an inch around the holes is dry and soft. Any ideas what could have caused them? I want to make sure nothing has burrowed into my walls before I seal them and paint over.

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Old 06-29-2009, 07:32 PM   #2
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Repairing Trim damage


It sounds like it is rotted out but could be damage from termites or carpenter ants.

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Old 06-30-2009, 08:01 AM   #3
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Repairing Trim damage


If they are 3/8" in dia. they were carpenter bees. You can find info on the web.
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Old 06-30-2009, 05:45 PM   #4
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Repairing Trim damage


From what I am reading of your post, you are looking at wood that has rotted from water damage. The height and width of the damage and the fact that there is the soft dry wood around the hole indicate this also. You indicate that these are trim around the window, are these holes near the bottom of the vertical pieces of trim where the trim pieces meet the window sill? IF SO, I see that often in my area. I believe it to be poor preparation of the trim wood before painting when the house was built. IMO-when rain water hits the window sill, it will bounce up onto the trim pieces making it wetter than just rain water that hits it and runs off, thus the 2" height of the damage. Chances are that you have damage to your window sill at the ends only also. It only takes a very small spot to start this. Without pictures I'm guessing here: the pieces of trim you have damaged may be common trim used in your area, and if so can be purchased to replace your damaged trim. I know, you only have the small area of damage. IF you can find matching trim, and IF you have the skills, you may be able to only replace the damaged portion. IMO-proper priming of the new wood, and proper paint and painting can help prevent this in the future. Good Luck, David
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Old 06-30-2009, 06:29 PM   #5
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Repairing Trim damage


Thanks, I think you are right. I don't have the skills to replace the whole frame -- I've filled the holes with Plastic Wood, sanded and painted. It looks fine and I hope by keeping the wood sealed now, I can prevent further damage. I'm on the case!

Thanks for you time,

Kristine
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Old 07-01-2009, 10:14 PM   #6
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Repairing Trim damage


Kristine, sorry but I don't think that "Plastic Wood" is going to last you very long. I don't see your location so that doesn't help. IF I even dare to repair a hole in a window sash, window frame, or window sill, because of homeowner's economic situation, I only use an epoxy type filler designed for exterior wood use. It took me many times to learn how to apply it so as not to have to do a lot of sanding but now it's better to work with. I'm still fond of removing the rotted wood back to some good wood and replacing that area with new wood. Just me in my old ways I guess. I agree that you are "on the case", that's more than some do for themselves. Good Luck, David
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Old 07-02-2009, 10:38 PM   #7
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Repairing Trim damage



Kristine, Welcome to the forum
Since you are new to the forum I suggest you fill in some of the bio info, At least your location

There is a Great section here for Introductions:
http://www.diychatroom.com/f38/
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Old 07-03-2009, 12:17 AM   #8
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Repairing Trim damage


Carpenter bees. Caulk it they'll find another way out or maybe die first.

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