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Old 05-02-2013, 09:09 PM   #1
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


I'm not sure if this is the correct forum, but:

I have some dry rot at my back door (exterior)-see attached picture. Any suggestions on the best way to repair this?

The dry rot doesn't go up more than ~ 6 inches.

Thanks,
Rob
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:05 PM   #2
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


I had a similar issue on my back door leading out from my utility room, below grade, to concrete steps leading up to the back yard. I chipped away all of the damaged wood as best I could. After that I applied wood hardener, and then wood filler, sanding it to the appropriate shape. Primer, then paint and good as new.
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:32 AM   #3
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


I like wood restoration products from Abatron and have used them for decades on sailboats and homes. Same concept as the Minwax products shown. You scrape out as much decayed and loose stuff as you can, use the liquid hardener to solidify the borders of what is left, and then fill with the paste. Let it harden. Then shape, sand, prime and paint.

http://www.abatron.com/building-and-....html?vmcchk=1



But, I can almost guarantee you are staring at an iceberg. If what you showed us is rotted I just bet you will find the wood under the aluminum threshold plate and perhaps beyond it is gone too and should be replaced rather than attempting to fill it in. You should at least pull one side of it up and peak so you know?

Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings but I suspect this is going to turn into something more than a casual project. I could be and hope I am wrong for your sake. Obviously I cannot poke at it in person.

I have never bought Abatron from but them so never worried much about expiration dates. If you get Minwax epoxy products (or any others but from the maker of them) from a hideous box store or something, do make sure the components are within the expiration date. No fault of Minwax, Rustoleum and others but some box stores seem lazy about rotating stock and there is not much worse when it comes to DIY projects gone bad than epoxy or other resins that will not cure because they are outdated. I have seen it most often with epoxy floor products sold past their prime that would have forever stayed gummy.

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Old 05-03-2013, 03:53 PM   #4
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


Thanks Dave & Sdsester.

I have a couple of additional pictures(https://picasaweb.google.com/1020487...CKShhN_G5Y_yHg).

I thought the Bondo was an option, but with the damage all the way through the 2x4, is there enough for the Bondo to hold on to? Is it possible to saw the bottom of this off and install a new 2x4? My thought with that, was how to secure it to the top (remaining board) and attaching it to the bottom. Is it possible to toe-nail this in?

Thanks again for any advice.
Rob
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:17 PM   #5
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


That kind of rot cannot be addressed with a patch product. It has to be replaced. Funny, Im working on something like this right now. The joint is flush but has not been filled and sanded yet. You need to do something like this. I fabricated it in one piece from a 2 x 6.
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:34 PM   #6
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


You did a great job! This the product I will use every time for wood rot restoration. http://www.rotdoctor.com/
it is the best on the market.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:13 PM   #7
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbags View Post
You did a great job! This the product I will use every time for wood rot restoration. http://www.rotdoctor.com/
it is the best on the market.
LOL Im nowhere near done yet, but thanks anyway. Im just trying to make the point that once wood has dry rotted to the extent that the OP's project has, it needs to be replaced. If the cell structure of the wood is gone, whats the point? Wood is not all that expensive.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:45 PM   #8
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


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Originally Posted by jagans View Post
LOL Im nowhere near done yet
But then why is it painted?

I completely agree with your method though. Replace the wood. Filler has it's place but this is "way" beyond that imo.

A table saw, router, sander and know how are required to complete the task seamlessly. If op is missing any of that then he/she should should find someone that does/can.
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:20 PM   #9
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


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But then why is it painted?

I completely agree with your method though. Replace the wood. Filler has it's place but this is "way" beyond that imo.

A table saw, router, sander and know how are required to complete the task seamlessly. If op is missing any of that then he/she should should find someone that does/can.
Thats just primer. Its going to get two coats of exterior white. Then a new magnetic weather strip in the groove.

Yeah you are right on the tools. You cant do much without them.
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Last edited by jagans; 05-03-2013 at 09:23 PM.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:29 AM   #10
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post
That kind of rot cannot be addressed with a patch product. It has to be replaced. Funny, Im working on something like this right now. The joint is flush but has not been filled and sanded yet. You need to do something like this. I fabricated it in one piece from a 2 x 6.
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I completely agree with your method though. Replace the wood. Filler has it's place but this is "way" beyond that imo.
i have to agree with you guys. and replacing it, imo, would be easier.
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Old 05-04-2013, 10:32 AM   #11
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


Thanks again for the advice.

Should I remove the entire board or use oscillating saw to cut it off a little above where the rot ends?

Also, what is the best method for reattaching (on the bottom it looks like it was nailed through threshold into this board, probable before installing as a unit).

Thanks.
Rob
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:01 PM   #12
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Repairing Dry Rot at exterior door


Hi Rob. In this case i think I would replace the whole mullion. Fabricate it first and drill counter sink holes with a forstner bit, then through holes. Then prime the whole board first before installation, especially the bottom end grain. Screw into place, plug the screw holes, sand, prime sanded the two coats of finish paint. Make sure your channel where your screen slides has weep holes to allow water to escape, maybe that's what caused this in the first place? trapped water.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:18 PM   #13
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