Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-13-2011, 08:44 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 346
Rewards Points: 250
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


I have several window and door frames at my house that are rotten. It's the same situation for most of them - the section about 3 inches up from the sill (or floor) is rotted from the inside out. You can push your finger in and it just crumbles away. Sometimes the paint is still there - but the wood under it crumbles. With a few - they feel a little spongey.

I had a contractor tell me that I could fix with Bondo. I told him I was worried about the moisture in there and mold. But he said that wood doesn't breed that.

So I figured I could take a grinding bit on a drill and just drill out the dryrot/rot. Then fill with Bondo and sand. Just like filling a cavity at the dentist, right?

Anyone have any thoughts here?

denemante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 09:22 AM   #2
Experienced
 
Jackofall1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 2,822
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


Your first inclination is correct, the rot is caused by moisture, first find why you have moisture issues, you will likely have some mold farms growing as well which should be taken care of.

Once you have identified and repaired the reasons for moisture, then you can think about how to fix the framing. Cut out the old rotten wood and replace with new and repaint.

Mark

__________________
When its all said and done there is usually more said than done
Jackofall1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jackofall1 For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (09-14-2011), Rob1975 (09-14-2011)
Old 09-13-2011, 10:06 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 346
Rewards Points: 250
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


Thanks for the reply. You're right - I've got to figure out why it's happened. The house is 13 years old and this wood is original.

In each case, the vertical piece that rotted sits on top of a horizontal piece. And since it's the very bottom of the vertical piece that's bad - my best guess is that the caulk dried up, and over time, rain hit the sills and worked its way under the end of the vertical piece - and rotted it from the bottom up. I also think the previous owner "overlooked" it and painted over it.

I'm not one to cover up problems myself. But my main concern is with Bondo - I'd seal in the problem - and it would continue to get worse.

I think what the other contractor meant was that if I sealed it up - it would stay sealed and nothing would spread/grow within the wall.

This is all on the outside of my house, by the way.
denemante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 11:40 AM   #4
DIY Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 30
Rewards Points: 25
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


I just fixed a similar situation on 3 windows. In my case, it was the bottom corners of the window sashes that had started to rot under the paint. I used System Three Rot Fix, SculpWood and a couple wood scraps to do the repair. I'm very happy with the outcome... time will tell how it holds up over the years. Bondo may work, but I would prefer to use a product specifically designed for wood repairs (Abatron is another company with similar products)- they are a little pricey though.
Ed G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 10:32 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


To have these go bad that soon indicates an incorrect installation of the doors and windows throughout the house. There's a good chance all or most of these are in various stages of deterioration. The ones facing the weather would be the ones prone to initial issues.
I would think all these will need to be removed and repaired or replaced.
Expect some sheathing damage and if left untreated, structural issues.
What exterior does the house have?
What make of windows?
It sounds like an issue a customer had with MI windows in a manufactured house upstate.
__________________
Ron
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
B. Franklin 1759
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ron6519 For This Useful Post:
kwikfishron (09-14-2011)
Old 09-13-2011, 11:05 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 346
Rewards Points: 250
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


The siding is hardiplank. Outside trim, frames and sills are wood. I've heard that neighbors have had issues with these "cheap" windows - but I don't know brand. The problem seems to be the wood is dovetailed in various places around the window - that the wood shrunk and exposed the inside - which the swelled, rotted, etc. In some cases it cracked seals and the windows fogged.

Thankfully, I have no such problems. All my windows are fine (except for this rot I speak off on a few).

Yes, my greatest fear with this issue is that if left untreated - it would cause much greater damage.

That's why I was wondering if I cored out the rot then patched if I would leave something behind inside that would continue the deterioration.

The areas are small and I know I could fix it to where you couldn't tell it was ever done. THEN - everything would be painted and sealed and watertight. I can't imagine the damage getting worse.

Yes - I might seal in a little old rot - but I know my house isn't going to fall down.

But I don't have an x-ray. The only way to tell if there was more damage inside the wall/frame would be with one - or by tearing off the siding and trim and looking. Seems that's a bit overkill...
denemante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 12:58 AM   #7
Not a Noob or Boob
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Naperville, IL
Posts: 109
Rewards Points: 75
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


I would never risk a cover up repair. If you can poke a finger through, there is more damage than you think. My guess is the contractor figured you were not going to pay what it would cost to do it right and wanted out of their, so he told you to fix with Bondo.

It is never "overkill" to do it right.

I am also not sure why you posted this question if you already had your mind made up. Were you looking for people to tell you it was okay to take the short cut?
Rob1975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 07:13 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by denemante View Post
The siding is hardiplank. Outside trim, frames and sills are wood. I've heard that neighbors have had issues with these "cheap" windows - but I don't know brand. The problem seems to be the wood is dovetailed in various places around the window - that the wood shrunk and exposed the inside - which the swelled, rotted, etc. In some cases it cracked seals and the windows fogged.

Thankfully, I have no such problems. All my windows are fine (except for this rot I speak off on a few).

Yes, my greatest fear with this issue is that if left untreated - it would cause much greater damage.

That's why I was wondering if I cored out the rot then patched if I would leave something behind inside that would continue the deterioration.

The areas are small and I know I could fix it to where you couldn't tell it was ever done. THEN - everything would be painted and sealed and watertight. I can't imagine the damage getting worse.

Yes - I might seal in a little old rot - but I know my house isn't going to fall down.

But I don't have an x-ray. The only way to tell if there was more damage inside the wall/frame would be with one - or by tearing off the siding and trim and looking. Seems that's a bit overkill...
I tried to explain what will happen, but you seem to want to do it your way.
This is not the way to do it.
The repair will not last.
Your other windows will be involved at some point.
But this is not my house, so do whatever you want.
__________________
Ron
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
B. Franklin 1759
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ron6519 For This Useful Post:
Rob1975 (09-14-2011)
Old 09-14-2011, 07:45 AM   #9
Mod
 
kwikfishron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kansas (NCK)
Posts: 7,576
Rewards Points: 2,190
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


Your entire thought process on how to resolve this issue is wrong. There are pros here willing to help but until you take the blinders off this thread is just a waste of time.

Post some pictures.
__________________
A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words
Especially In The DIY Chatroom
kwikfishron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to kwikfishron For This Useful Post:
Rob1975 (09-14-2011)
Old 09-15-2011, 09:08 AM   #10
Is this wire Hot?
 
Oh-Fudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 177
Rewards Points: 150
Default

repair rotted window frames with Bondo?


denemante, I used Bondo to repair some rot on my fascia boards a few years ago and this year it started falling apart despite priming and painting over it. My rain gutter started falling off because the screws lost their bite, so now I am replacing the entire board. It may be okay for small repairs but any substantial rot you probably want to either replace the board or use one of the epoxy wood hardeners and fillers.

Here is one site for info, but there are many brands of this stuff.
www.rotdoctor.com

Oh-Fudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Window repair reimersjo Windows and Doors 1 08-03-2011 07:55 PM
Painting aluminum window frames Rustygaff Painting 4 07-21-2011 02:41 PM
How do replace rotted wood in window frame? Sherm Windows and Doors 7 07-13-2011 01:50 PM
How do I repair my window frame sherlock Carpentry 18 12-20-2006 08:54 AM
Window jamb helpless handyman Carpentry 11 08-03-2006 12:45 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.