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forcedreno2012 10-24-2013 08:10 PM

Removing a stud in the kitchen for a niche
 
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I would like to incorporate a niche like the one below behind the range / cooktop. I think this is a neat idea but concerned about removing a stud. The wall the oven will be on is the garage / laundry wall. The roof joists run parallel with this wall. The studs are 16"oc. If I rip out a middle one and double up the studs on either side am I messing with any codes? Do I treat this as an opening such as a window with a jack stud or is that overkill. Would only have a salt and pepper mill and probably an olive oil bottle.

Thanks

Robyn

gregzoll 10-24-2013 08:18 PM

You are going to have to place the proper header in there, since it is a load bearing wall.

forcedreno2012 10-24-2013 08:51 PM

Greg, thanks for the info. Not sure here and maybe I did not provide enough information. The wall is the wall between the kitchen and the garage / laundry area. We are SOG and no basement. I thought load bearing was when there were perpendicular joists or is this load bearing because its the wall to the garage? I have no issue with treating this niche like a window with a header etc but am curious as to the load bearing facet.

Thanks

Robyn

sublime2 10-24-2013 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by forcedreno2012 (Post 1257685)
I would like to incorporate a niche like the one below behind the range / cooktop. I think this is a neat idea but concerned about removing a stud. The wall the oven will be on is the garage / laundry wall. The roof joists run parallel with this wall. The studs are 16"oc. If I rip out a middle one and double up the studs on either side am I messing with any codes? Do I treat this as an opening such as a window with a jack stud or is that overkill. Would only have a salt and pepper mill and probably an olive oil bottle.

Thanks

Robyn

You'll be fine.
Go for it.

gregzoll 10-24-2013 09:20 PM

If you were to look at the wall between the laundry area and garage, you will find that it is framed as a load bearing wall.

TheEplumber 10-24-2013 09:32 PM

The way to confirm it is load bearing is to look in the attic to see if the wall supports any roof framing. Sounds like its non bearing though

forcedreno2012 10-24-2013 10:11 PM

Y'all just want me to go up in the attic dont'cha :laughing:

A week or so away from tearing out that part of the ceiling and pulling the old crap up there out but will check. In retrospect, I am thinking it may actually be load bearing even if the trusses are parallel. I know there is a step down into the garage but not the laundry room so it would make sense to treat it like an exterior wall. Not sure if the footers are the same either based on that step. I will take a picture up there when we get there. Pretty much overbuild stuff round here anyway but it will be interesting to know for the future as I am contemplating opening up another door down the same wall.

In looking at the wall before I posted, I noticed that there is some old plumbing in the wall to what looks like used to be a utility sink in the laundry room. I might have to brace some of the studs anyway. Looks like someone got a leeeetle careless with the saw when running the pipes.

Thanks

Robyn

danpik 10-25-2013 06:35 AM

If the trusses (if they truly are trusses) run parallel to the wall then I doubt it is a load bearing wall. You would have to verify that the trusses on both sides of it run parallel. If it turns out to be a load bearing wall, then you wouls treat it no differently than you would a window as far as the framing goes.

brockmiera 10-25-2013 04:43 PM

Who really cares about taking the time to figure out if its load bearing?!!??! Just put in the header and be safe rather than sorry. All you need is a double 2x4 header anyway.

Seattle2k 10-25-2013 07:11 PM

Is this an exterior/insulated wall? I assume the garage is not a conditioned (sealed, heated/cooled) room. Therefore, if you put the niche in, will you be removing insulation?

wkearney99 10-25-2013 08:22 PM

What's on the other side? And do you know if the space in there is empty or not? If the laundry stuff is directly behind then there might be plumbing in there. Other possibilities are HVAC ducts or electrical wires.

But if it's a clear space then just frame it as if it were a window. It's not the load going into this niche that you're worried about, it's the load of the structure above. Be it bearing or not you'd still do well to frame it like a window. And if the opposite wall is accessible then make sure nobody ever puts any fasteners into it. Otherwise you'd be popping out into the niche.

If it's an exterior wall into the garage then putting a niche in there would lose whatever insulating value you've got in there now. If you really want the niche and you need to keep it insulated then you're going to have to frame it out on one side or the other. We did a niche in the master bath steam shower by studding out another 2x4 into the shower. This left the dividing wall between it and the adjacent room intact and insulated.

sublime2 10-25-2013 08:55 PM

Forget about the insulation!
We're talking about MAYBE a 2' by 2' area.
The insulation lose is minimal at best.

forcedreno2012 10-25-2013 11:21 PM

We will frame it as if it were a window opening but we are moving walls further down the line on the same wall so need to check on load bearing anyway.

As for the insulation question....we live in Mississippi so not that cold. We have spent the last year with concrete floors and no insulation (or interior walls for that matter) from 4' on down so ANY insulation is going to be an improvement :laughing:

Robyn

Live_Oak 10-26-2013 11:28 AM

With it being a garage wall, be sure that the drywall on the other side is fire code rated and caulked properly to prevent any carbon monoxide infiltration. It's a fire wall as well as a potentially load bearing wall. Or, it should be.

A niche can be a great decorative accent for a pro style range, but for actual storage or use, they are not that practical. Behind the range is about the worst possible location for oil storage or spice storage. It will make it go rancid much more quickly than if kept in a cool dark location. It's also a bit of a safety hazard to reach across the open flame for seasonings stored there.


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