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-   -   Reinforcing Door Jambs - How? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/reinforcing-door-jambs-how-24815/)

NNJGUY 08-06-2008 11:22 AM

Reinforcing Door Jambs - How?
 
OK, some of you might have been involved in my rotten door sill thread but I thought this question warranted its own post!

If a door is going to be replaced, or work is going to be done so that the door frame construction is exposed, how would one go about reinforcing the door jamb against a kick-in or other forced entry?

I know there are several products on the market, (any recommendations) and some people have mentioned even running thin sheet metal strapping up the jamb along with longer and more screws.

Again, not being a carpenter, I'm looking for suggestions so that I can have an intelligent conversation with my carpenter.

I know that any residential door can be breached with time, I just want as much time as possible if it were to ever happen. I want the effort to get through the door to be higher.

Here's some stuff I found...Anybody use any of these?

http://anarchangel.blogspot.com/2006...-entrance.html

http://www.kikgard.com/quality.html

http://www.thenationallocksmith.com/public.asp?2

http://www.djarmor.com/Universal-Com...&category=-101

If true, it does not seem to be that much more in the cost department if it works.

Thoughts? Experiences?

Thanks!

Termite 08-06-2008 11:41 AM

I have lots of experience with this. The city I previously worked for had a very tough security ordinance. The "jamb brace" product door retrofit kit is very effective. I am 6'6" 300lbs, and I couldn't kick in their demo door. The SWAT team was involved in the implementation of the security ordinance, because they can't effectively ram the latch side of the door with this system in place...They have to hit the center and fold the door in.

http://www.jambbrace.com/

Nice thing is that you can't tell the door jamb has been modified unless you're looking for it. Generally, it involves a strike plate that is linked to a full-length aluminum strip that runs on the latch side.

NNJGUY 08-06-2008 11:49 AM

I'll look into that. Thanks! Any others?

Termite 08-06-2008 01:07 PM

The product I'm recommending is much less visible than the products you've linked to. If it is a steel door, there's no need to saddle the deadbolt. If it is a wood door, plan on installing a saddle over the deadbolt in addition to whatever jamb system you choose.

NNJGUY 08-06-2008 01:24 PM

It'll likely be a fiberglass door. Both carpenters I'm talking to are recommending a Therma Tru product. I bet this jambrace plus the little metal saddle for over the deadbolt would really to the trick.

I can't seem to find a vendor close to me. Maybe I can get someone on their list to ship a couple to NJ.

Thanks!

Big Bob 08-06-2008 01:49 PM

If you want to give even the swat team a hard time...(it ain't purdy but)

solid case hard steel bar or a bundle of rebar across middle of your in-swing door. (as heavy duty as you can lift) ... Mounting flanges for bar with concealed through bolt and large plate affixed to outside of reinforced exterior wall sheathing.

over the years I have beefed up many door systems after break-ins. I built system similar to those above and installed the heavy duty cups and striker plates adding stronger screws and bolts. it's all about time and trouble.

Portable power tools make it easy to drill then cut around locks..
No need for a thief to risk foot damage.

don't be an attractive victim.

Down south we leave a pair of muddy size 16 work boots outside the door
Next to "killer's" over-sized dog dish.

AtlanticWBConst. 08-06-2008 05:41 PM

We too have had to re-inforce many a replacement door and door jamb, after breakins. Just realize that, if they want to get in, they can figure out a way to get in. There are other ways. Make sure that you cover them.

One luxury apartment complex had repeated break-ins to their media room, located in their clubhouse. Their big screen equipment being stolen.

We replaced the first door (Just replaced, per their request), we re-inforced the second door (they tore the entire door out of the opening), the third door, we used a steel one, with re-inforcements like those listed already. They never made it thru that door. But, they tried breaking thru the wall.
FWIW: The alarm system that we had told the property managers to buy, since the beginning, is what finally stopped that particular problem. I am sure that they probably would have gotten thru the wall on the next try.

Termite 08-06-2008 06:06 PM

Around here the crooks are known to take a 36" 2x4 with a door hinge in the middle. They stick it in the door opening like this "/\" and push down on the hinge, making it straighten out and get wider like this "---". It quietly (compared to kicking) spreads the door jamb apart enough to allow the door to swing open.

So, the security ordinances for new construction require horizontal blocking between the studs on either side of the door to make this technique ineffective.

Remember, you can hang a steel bank vault door in the opening, but it is only as strong as the wall and the method of attachment.

buletbob 08-06-2008 06:17 PM

its funny you mentioned that I had some one kick in my door while I was working on the house next door that we purchased. I herd this big bang while I was sitting in my office next door, I walked outside on the front porch and look over at the house and did not see anything unusual, so went back inside . about 15 minutes later I had to go next door to measure something and decided to use the back door of the house, when I noticed the door was kicked in. jamb was split and My 5-1/4" custom casing was pulled away from the wall. So what I did was to have my AC contractor bend me up a piece of heavy gauge sheet metal about 40" long 4-9/16" wide with a 90 degree bend to cover the inside jamb. I used guerilla glue to glue the split jamb back into position and clamped it until dry.
then I installed the sheet metal into position and marked out for the dead bolt . cut the slot for the dead bolt and reinstalled the sheetmetal blocket and shimmed it tight to the jamb. then got some #12 x 4-1/2" wood screws and drilled them into the jamb and and into the jack studs. Its not going anywhere now. And that was a 1-3/4 solid fir door.
Just thought I save you a post God Luck. BOB

NNJGUY 08-06-2008 10:21 PM

Thanks all. I'm aware any door can be breached by the someone w/ the proper motivation (why can't they be motivated to stay in school instead?)

I'm less concerned w/ a break in while I am not home, than a forced entry when I or my family IS home. I want to hear them. I want some time. I want them to work on it more than one swift kick.

I'll hear a buzzsaw, or if they have to kick the door a few times I'll be able to react. If they still want in, and come through the wall, then it's pretty clear they aren't coming over for tea. :laughing:

Just want time.

Thanks!

Termite 08-07-2008 08:01 AM

Good point! Right before we started requiring the security measures on new construction, a new homeowner had a break-in while the family was home. The wife was nursing the baby in the 2nd floor nursery and a guy walking by saw her through the window. He decided to kick in the door to get at her. The door came right off since the home didn't quite make the cutoff for the required hardware, and the woman's husband used the door as a shield to beat the guy back until an off-duty officer driving by stopped and took the guy down. The couple's builder had previously been opposed to spending several hundred dollars extra on the security measures, but jumped right on board with it after hearing his customer's story.

Kjohn 09-22-2011 11:11 AM

This one looks pretty good.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by NNJGUY (Post 146427)
OK, some of you might have been involved in my rotten door sill thread but I thought this question warranted its own post!

If a door is going to be replaced, or work is going to be done so that the door frame construction is exposed, how would one go about reinforcing the door jamb against a kick-in or other forced entry?

I know there are several products on the market, (any recommendations) and some people have mentioned even running thin sheet metal strapping up the jamb along with longer and more screws.

Again, not being a carpenter, I'm looking for suggestions so that I can have an intelligent conversation with my carpenter.

I know that any residential door can be breached with time, I just want as much time as possible if it were to ever happen. I want the effort to get through the door to be higher.

Here's some stuff I found...Anybody use any of these?

http://anarchangel.blogspot.com/2006...-entrance.html

http://www.kikgard.com/quality.html

http://www.thenationallocksmith.com/public.asp?2

http://www.djarmor.com/Universal-Com...&category=-101

If true, it does not seem to be that much more in the cost department if it works.

Thoughts? Experiences?

Thanks!

I ran across this one. You might want to check it out. Installation looks easy and it appears to be secure. It's also less expensive than some of the others I have looked at. http://www.break-inbarrier.com.


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