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-   -   Questions about corners when standing up walls (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/questions-about-corners-when-standing-up-walls-185892/)

mklein49 08-25-2013 11:11 AM

Questions about corners when standing up walls
 
Hi Folks,

I'm a beginner here attempting to build a shed in my backyard. I've done mostly stick building in the past and was able to work my way through the corners. I wanted to try a shed as a learning exercise. I'll list my question first, because the description of my problem is long.

Question:
Can you help my understand the proper method for laying out studs when constructing exterior walls on the ground such that the corners will be able to be nailed together easily?

Background:
My main area of concern is how corners will come out. I had read online which detailed where to position my first stud on a wall, 15 1/4" - size of sheathing from the edge of the wall, which seems reasonable. However, I could see based on the length of my wall I will end up at the opposite end of the wall with two studs very near each other. The location of the second to last stud, prevents me from being able to nail the corner together. So I can think of a few ways to work around this: one, add another board as a nailer for that corner or, two, perhaps I leave out that second to last stud so I can nail my corner together and add it later. Neither case seems right to me though. A third option would be to do the studs in the opposite direction, but then that throws out my spacing for the sheathing on the edge.

joecaption 08-25-2013 02:25 PM

http://wayneofthewoods.com/Tiphowtoframeawallcorner.htm
Adding that extra stud after the walls are up and nailed is fine to do that way.

woodworkbykirk 08-25-2013 06:32 PM

if omitting that 2nd last stud doesnt mess up the edge of the sheathing landing on a stud just leave it out.. however if the end of your plywood is left flapping just slam the 2nd last stud hard to hte corner post

Willie T 08-25-2013 07:47 PM

What is the length and width of this shed? (outside)

mklein49 08-25-2013 08:25 PM

Thanks for all the replies thus far. The shed is roughly 10'x10'. It ended up being 119.5"x119.5" with the 10' pad not being quite square. So, I ended up with 4 walls 116" in length. My 2nd to last stud was at 110 3/4" and the final stud is at 114 1/2", so there is just a 2 1/4" gap between them and they shouldn't be on a plywood seem. Sounds like I may be fine omitting that stud?

Since, my main focus with this project is to learn, I'm interested not only in what works, but what is proper technique for laying out these walls? Seems like this is a scenario that must come up often. Is just leaving it out and adding it later if need be the standard method? What about if sheathing is also added on the ground?

Thanks again!

Duckweather 08-25-2013 08:28 PM

You can put the last stud in, nail the corner post parts together and put it in as one unit, or build the corner post, and put the stud in after it, before sheathing. This assumes you will square it and sheath it last.

mae-ling 08-26-2013 10:58 PM

I would probably build one wall with sheething then stand it, overhang th3 3.5" on one side, then the next overhanging the sheething the 3.5" so it overlaps the 1st wall built, then the next then the next. going around in a circle so to speak.

Becauise of the overlaping the walls you really have a 20" or so last space which I would leave at that instead of a 16" and a 4" space.

This is a 1 story shed which really could have 24" stud spacing and be to code.

hand drive 08-27-2013 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mklein49 (Post 1234176)
Thanks for all the replies thus far. The shed is roughly 10'x10'. It ended up being 119.5"x119.5" with the 10' pad not being quite square. So, I ended up with 4 walls 116" in length. My 2nd to last stud was at 110 3/4" and the final stud is at 114 1/2", so there is just a 2 1/4" gap between them and they shouldn't be on a plywood seem. Sounds like I may be fine omitting that stud?

Since, my main focus with this project is to learn, I'm interested not only in what works, but what is proper technique for laying out these walls? Seems like this is a scenario that must come up often. Is just leaving it out and adding it later if need be the standard method? What about if sheathing is also added on the ground?

Thanks again!

it is simple really. start at the corner and pull your stud layout in the direction that you put up your sheathing and don't forget which direction it is. for your situation you can put two full sheathing boards up on every wall and then come back and add your rips for the corners.
make sure when you pull stud layout that the layout puts the stud in the middle of the sheathing breaks/seams. I pull 15 1/4" and mark for edge of stud and set stud ahead each time. you can certainly skip a stud near corners if there is no seam in the plywood at that spot.

Duckweather 08-27-2013 09:27 AM

Most framers build two opposite walls with a corner post at each end. For 2 x 4 walls two studs with 12 to 16" blocks between. this gives nailing for the adjoining wall. It sounds like you were using just one end stud. Next we build the remaining two walls between the ones standing. To square the wall for sheathing, toenail the bottom on a line, measure from top corner at one end to the bottom corner at the opposite end in both directions. If there is a difference tap the top corner with the longest measurement towards the one with the shortest, 1/2 the difference. Put a pencil line on the floor next to the corner so you can see how far yo move it. Check again until the measurements are identical and the wall is square. Tack it so it doesn't move or get bumped.

mae-ling 08-27-2013 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duckweather (Post 1234822)
Most framers build two opposite walls with a corner post at each end. For 2 x 4 walls two studs with 12 to 16" blocks between. this gives nailing for the adjoining wall. It sounds like you were using just one end stud. Next we build the remaining two walls between the ones standing. To square the wall for sheathing, toenail the bottom on a line, measure from top corner at one end to the bottom corner at the opposite end in both directions. If there is a difference tap the top corner with the longest measurement towards the one with the shortest, 1/2 the difference. Put a pencil line on the floor next to the corner so you can see how far yo move it. Check again until the measurements are identical and the wall is square. Tack it so it doesn't move or get bumped.

Yep that is one way. Many framers do different things. Some sheet walls then stand which is common here. Some use the ladder you describe for interior walls, some use and L made from 2x6 and 2x4, or 2 - 2x6 depending on wall thickness.
Heck I have even seen some guys who toenail exterior studs in place after wall is up.


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