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Old 07-28-2014, 11:24 AM   #1
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Question about deck blocks


Greetings all,
Long time no post - I've continued lurking though

Earlier this year I bought an above ground pool. Its 18 feet in diameter. We had the ground leveled and set up the pool a few weeks ago. I'm actually in the process of draining it so I can better situate it and remove some rocks under it that didn't get covered properly and are producing hard spots on the pool bottom.

The pool gets chock full of grass and dirt from my kids getting in and out of it. No amount of running the pump seems to get it all out and I figure its about time I eliminate the grass problem and also provide for a small sitting area.

I'm planning on building a small deck - perhaps about 12 feet from the edge of the pool at its furthest distance. I've been researching like crazy and am torn between renting a post hole digger and making 3 foot holes for 4x4 posts or using these:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Oldcastle...1611/205182016

The deck itself is not going to be very large and because the pool itself is not a permanent fixture the idea was to have the deck be impermanent as well.

Can anyone attest to their experiences with these style blocks and their upsides/downsides to putting a 4x4 in the ground? If I were to do that I'd dig a hole, put some concrete in the bottom to get a good floor and then put the 4x4 in place and re-add the dirt compacting as I go along. This way if I ever had to tear down the deck I wouldn't have to tear out the concrete.

As a point of reference my dirt is crap and full of rocks. If I could avoid digging and the deck still be safe and sturdy, I'd like to do that.

Thanks for your help!

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Old 07-28-2014, 11:37 AM   #2
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Question about deck blocks


Make it easy on yourself and go the deck block route, should work out just fine.

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Old 07-28-2014, 01:15 PM   #3
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Question about deck blocks


I would not use the deck blocks .They are not stable enough and will sink.They are not made for that purpose.If you wanted to sink some sonotubes and pour concrete for them to bear on?Then maybe but then you just as well pour posts.
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Old 07-28-2014, 01:24 PM   #4
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Question about deck blocks


I'm with mako1 on this one.
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Old 07-28-2014, 03:33 PM   #5
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Question about deck blocks


I always thought thought that the single use for deck blocks was to set a cheap shed on, but we had a situation last year in which we used them for a 48' residential wheelchair ramp, and, so far, I have been pleasantly surprised. Without significant interior renovations, it had to be on the front of the house, and the local zoning official would not budge as far as allowing actual footings within the setback. (And the setback by the way was 150', so it was a down right ridiculous situation.) Anyway, I happened to be having coffee one morning with the local building inspector, and he was the one who actually suggested going that route. So that's what we ended up doing, went back this spring after one of the hardest winters we've had in years, checked it with a transit and levels, and, practically speaking, it hasn't moved. There still aren't many things that I would use them for, but I have to give them a bit more credit that I once did. Have wondered since though if they might ride the frost better with a couple of feet anyway of gravel under them.
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Old 07-28-2014, 04:31 PM   #6
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Question about deck blocks


Lots of difference between a wheel chair ramp and a freestanding deck.
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Old 07-28-2014, 05:33 PM   #7
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I was in the Smoky mountains last week, and saw them used on a 15x20 addition to a log home roof and all sitting on 9 blocks, I made a comment about them and was told the addition has been there 6 years and nothing has moved in that time, so i'd say the OP should be able to do his little deck with confidence.
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Old 07-28-2014, 05:49 PM   #8
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Question about deck blocks


I imagine that location, soil type and conditions all come into play. That said, I've used those blocks many times over the years for small decks and never once had an issue.
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:13 PM   #9
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"As a point of reference my dirt is crap and full of rocks. If I could avoid digging and the deck still be safe and sturdy, I'd like to do that."



Just reread your post Sarge, and this time your rocks in the dirt are a blessing, makes for a stable base for the deck blocks.
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:20 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canarywood1
"As a point of reference my dirt is crap and full of rocks. If I could avoid digging and the deck still be safe and sturdy, I'd like to do that." Just reread your post Sarge, and this time your rocks in the dirt are a blessing, makes for a stable base for the deck blocks.
This is exactly what I figured but I wanted to hear what others would have to say. I do think I'll go with the blocks. I'll post pics when I'm done.
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:22 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssgtjoenunez View Post
This is exactly what I figured but I wanted to hear what others would have to say. I do think I'll go with the blocks. I'll post pics when I'm done.



We'll look forward to them.

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