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Old 06-23-2011, 12:32 PM   #16
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


Thank you for giving us more detail on the chain of events. In light of what you've said, I would be baffled by this guys lack of skill when it comes to hanging doors. Especially since it appears to be decidedly different than the quality that you saw at a friends house. He should have been able to scribe the doors tighter to the floor and even matched the slope UP TO A POINT. That would have made the crooked floor much less noticable. An overlapping astragal should have posed no problem and an active privacy set with matching dummy trim should have been a no brainer, especially on a bedroom door opening. Edge mounted auto flush bolts on the idle door would have been more practical and would have worked well with the privacy set. If a guy represents himself as a professional, you shouldn't have double check about fit and finish. He should also have thoroughly reviewed the expected hardware operation before the start in case he needed to special order anything due to the finish requirement.

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Old 06-23-2011, 12:34 PM   #17
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


I don't understand this shortened door issue with Home Depot. Why would any carpenter need someone else to cut down a door(for a $100.00 per door)?
You didn't order a "custom sized" door, you just cut down a standard door. Any idiot with a saw can cut a door down. Not your idiot, but most.
Solutions.
Put an interior saddle under the door.
or
Replace the doors and have them installed correctly.
While you're at it, specify all the components and make sure you and the carpenter are on the same page. Your lack of research and specifics are partly to blame for the hardware issue.
Did you pay him in full for this before you saw the end result?
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:48 PM   #18
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


I can't tell you all how much I appreciate the responses/advice!

Lesson learned: there's no such thing as too much research when it comes to picking out a contractor. I'll definitely be checking licenses moving forward and will take a more active role in defining the specs. If I'm installing a door I'll make sure to see examples of his/her experience with door installs -- not trust that if he does nice work in kitchens and building cabinets that his skills can transfer to doors as well.

I will definitely look into door saddles and consult with some reputable (and fully licensed!) trim carpenters in the area. Sounds like there is still hope for me and maybe I'll have some "After" photos to share here soon.

Thank you all again!
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:57 PM   #19
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
Any idiot with a saw can cut a door down. Not your idiot, but most.
That's funny stuff right there.
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Old 06-23-2011, 04:34 PM   #20
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


For starters the fact that the floor is not level is irrelevant. As stated earlier I am a trim carpenter and in 15 years I've hung thousands of doors and here's a little secret. If you hang a door that is level in an opening that is not the net effect is a crooked looking door. When i hang doors, although i do use a level (mostly before i start installing the door to see what i'm up against) the most trusted tool is my tape measure. Of course the doors have to be functional but when it comes to finish carpentry appearance is just as important because ... well... people see it. An experienced carpenter knows different ways to "cheat" to deal with openings such as these so not only are the doors functional but also look "level" even when they are not. Level to the level is not always the same as level to the eye. It is absolutely the caprenters fault for agreeing to take payment for a job he clearly didn't know how to do. ( A little bit of knowledge is far more dangerous than none at all. ) The average homeowner does not know all the ins and outs about hanging a door, if they did they wouldnt need to hire us. You cant expect the homeowner to point out to the "pro" how to do his job.
Dummy knobs are for closet doors. The correct way to do double swing doors is:
- decide which will be the stationary door ( usually the one that opens up to block the switch)
- install a regular passage knob on this door with the exclusion of the backset
- install a locking mechanism to the top of this door ( a surface bolt is common but you dont use a beaver to cut your hole and there should be a striker plate to put over it.
- on the side of the stationary door where the plate for the backset would normally go you chisel out the lead edge of the door and attach a striker plate much like you would on the jamb of a single door.
-the swing door gets the same doorknob treatment as a single door would.
- to the back of the stationary door you attach the astragal to block light and act as a stop for the swing door.

So essentially your "stationary" door when locked into place becomes the jamb for your swing door.... oh and i hate to add to your misery but technically.... those dummy levers ... ? they are upside down... just to add fuel to the fire for you.

Unfortunately in order to trully correct the problem as previously stated by others... the doors need to come out and be re hung correctly ... by someone who is obviously more qualified than the last guy. Picking a general contractor is a rough go. Although there are many good ones, There is a reason why in new home construction they have specialized trades... ie. the guy who frames your house is not the guy who trims it. You're familliar with the phrase jack of all trades, master of none ? I would recommend looking for a trim carpenter and not a gc. And by all means get 6 or 7 quotes ... but never take the guy who is 500 dollars cheaper than everyone else... there is usually a reason he comes so cheap.
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Old 06-23-2011, 05:32 PM   #21
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


Sorry I'm late to the party, but I have to comment.

Regardless of whether you researched the project properly or not is a non-issue in my opinion.

Anyone who agrees to take on a job like that is responsible for doing a professional job. That particular job is not that of a professional.

Regardless of whether you are re-using existing jambs or ripping and replacing, the margins around the door should not vary more than 1/16" to be generous.

That double door is a bi-swing closet door with ball catches.

A bedroom door should have slide bolts mortised into edge of the stile on the secondary panel and a privacy lockset installed in the active panel. Dummy knobs on the inactive panel are optional.

By no stretch should you have a gap between the jamb and the casing. Either the jamb should have been ordered to the proper width of the wall, or the trim should have been rabbeted out for the drywall. There are a dozen other things that could have been done to make that work without a gap.

The gap at the bottom isn't as offensive to me as is the fact that it isn't consistent. I prefer a decent space under doors for proper function of HVAC units. Unless you have a cold air return in every room, that space is necessary for proper function of a forced air system, assuming yours is.

BTW, I can't say for sure, but the miters on your casing look a bit suspect as well. Maybe it's the lighting.
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Old 06-23-2011, 05:56 PM   #22
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


just for future reference, I work in a pretty big shop and if someone came in with a door to cut down it wouldnt cost nearly as much as you stated. In fact we would probably do that for a coffee or lunch...The proper way to fix the gap under the door is to take off the casing, remove the jambs and door from the opening and cut them to the appropriate height. You will most likely need new casing, but that is cheap anyway.
Have that boyfriend of yours watch a few youtube videos and strap on the tool belt! With proper knowledge, this can be a perfect diy project.
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:43 PM   #23
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


Yeah looks like he was in over his head, his work is not at a professional level.

Sometimes with someone half the price you will get half the quality. However my advice is do not get installs from a big box store either. Go to a local lumberyard and see if they can refer a good carpenter or door specialist. Better yet go to do a door specialty place, they can probably refer you to someone who can fix it.

good luck

Last edited by chrisBC; 07-01-2011 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:46 PM   #24
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Is this quality work? (Interior Doors)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Millertyme View Post
just for future reference, I work in a pretty big shop and if someone came in with a door to cut down it wouldnt cost nearly as much as you stated. In fact we would probably do that for a coffee or lunch...The proper way to fix the gap under the door is to take off the casing, remove the jambs and door from the opening and cut them to the appropriate height. You will most likely need new casing, but that is cheap anyway.
Have that boyfriend of yours watch a few youtube videos and strap on the tool belt! With proper knowledge, this can be a perfect diy project.
But if you do that, that door sits lower accross the top then the door next to it. Just as bad.
If you don't want to install a saddle under the door(still marginal), replace the door and have it cut by someone who knows one end of a tape measure from the other.

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