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dabensys 08-07-2008 08:56 AM

Porch roof tie in question
 
Hello. I am a novice remodeler. I am preparing to start building a 10 x 14 porch next spring. The 14 section will be running against the house. I am studying up on several design topics to make sure that I build the porch properly. The porch will be replacing an existing deck on the back of our 2-story brick home. Note: The existing deck will be demolished including the posts and footers because I already know the footers are insufficient to carry the porch load.

I am considering 2 options for the porch roof. The first is to construct a shed roof where I would attach a ledger to the house using 1/2" bolts and tie the roof in that way. I plan on building the walls to 8 ft. In this design, would the rafters sit on the roof ledger? If so, and I want at least a 2/12 pitch, doesn't that mean the ledger would have to be attached to the house above the second floor band joist (note: our house has 8 foot walls on both floors).

Option number 2 which is more preferable to us (for aesthetic reasons) is to construct a gable roof on the porch with a 4/12 pitch. The gable ends would run perpendicular to the wall of the house. I am at a loss as to how I would tie the rafters (or ridge beam) in to the house in this design. :eek: I appreciate any advice.

Termite 08-07-2008 01:03 PM

There are soooo many variables to this.

Sounds like the new roof will attach to the house's walls and will not intersect any of the existing roof. Right?

Normally, the existing structure of the house is used to support the ridge, which is installed perpindicular to the house's wall. The wall is opened to facilitate installation of bearing studs to take the load from the ridge. If the ridge's or roof's load will be transfered to a wall that sits atop a cantilevered floor, that would be a major obstacle.

The starter rafters are nailed to the face of the wall at each stud in most situations. They do not run perpindicular to the house's wall.

You need to consult with a design professional on this.

dabensys 08-07-2008 02:48 PM

Thanks thekctermite for your reply.

I have access and can open the wall and install bearing studs to support the ridge. The exterior wall of the house through which the ridge would go is 2x4. If the ridge is built using 2 2x10's, can the load be adequately transferred using just 2 2X4's?

Regarding your question if the existing structure is on a cantilevered floor, the answer is 'no'.

Thank you again. I appreciate your reply.

jogr 08-08-2008 11:29 AM

You could also use roof trusses and then you won't need the structural ridge beam and so won't need to put load bearing into the existing wall.

There is also a way to stick frame the roof that doesn't require a load bearing ridge beam. It just uses a ridge board - but I'm not a pro framer so I can't give you details on how it is done. Maybe someone else on here is familiar with this technique.

Termite 08-08-2008 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jogr (Post 146997)
There is also a way to stick frame the roof that doesn't require a load bearing ridge beam. It just uses a ridge board - but I'm not a pro framer so I can't give you details on how it is done. Maybe someone else on here is familiar with this technique.

Roofs steeper than 3/12 pitch can be framed with a ridge that is essentially non-structural. The rafters must be tied together with low collar ties or ceiling joists however. These ties prevent the rafter heels/posts/walls from thrusting outward under roof load.

2x4's in the house's wall can certainly support the load. What you need to do is have the assistance of a design professional. Although two 2x4's are all that would directly support the ridge, it might require 6, 7, 8, or more studs to stiffen the bearing members. It all depends on load and structural reactions.

dabensys 08-11-2008 02:28 PM

Thanks to everyone who posted a reply to my question. Since I have a good deal of time before I start work on the porch, I have decided to consult a design professional. I can read plans and build pretty well, so I'm leaving the design work to the experts.

Regards,

Dabensys

Termite 08-11-2008 02:46 PM

Smart move! I think you'll be glad you did, and it will be an easier project with a good design and plan to go off of.


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