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Old 09-06-2011, 06:53 PM   #1
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


Hi

I have some pine baseboards (made), there 0.5 inch at the top and 0.75 inch at the base, and about 3.25 inches high, very simple design.

However the walls arenít super straight (slight beach effect), leaves around 1/16 gap at the top of the baseboards in some parts.... so heres the question.

Could i get away with using glue for the wood to dry?

Nails (panel pins as there tiny) donít really hold it in place fully (in Europe tend to glue / nail).

I dont want to use high nails as i will need to finish the surface, however i can get this board to stay to the wall to well due to how un-even it seems to be....

Normally i would use wood glue which would adhear to the wall as well, ideas though please.

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Old 09-06-2011, 07:15 PM   #2
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


I am assuming that you have 1/16 gap if you hold it against the wall? How big is the gap with no tension on it?

There are tons of ways to deal with this; I'm sure the carpenters will chime in.... chime in, guys.
- I've seen this dealt with by using liquid nails and nailing a block of wood to the floor to keep the board snug while the glue sets.
- You could kerf the back of the board some so it takes less tension to hold it to the wall.
- You could shave the baseboard at the high spots.
- You could leave the gap and fill.
- You could slap some joint compound on the wall and feather the low spot

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Old 09-06-2011, 07:25 PM   #3
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


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Originally Posted by SFX Group View Post
I dont want to use high nails as i will need to finish the surface
How else are you going to hit the studs?

You fill the nail holes before you apply the final finish and caulk the top if need be or if your going to paint.
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Old 09-06-2011, 07:30 PM   #4
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leah Frances View Post
I am assuming that you have 1/16 gap if you hold it against the wall? How big is the gap with no tension on it?

There are tons of ways to deal with this; I'm sure the carpenters will chime in.... chime in, guys.
- I've seen this dealt with by using liquid nails and nailing a block of wood to the floor to keep the board snug while the glue sets.
- You could kerf the back of the board some so it takes less tension to hold it to the wall.
- You could shave the baseboard at the high spots.
- You could leave the gap and fill.
- You could slap some joint compound on the wall and feather the low spot

I think you got all of them!
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Old 09-06-2011, 07:38 PM   #5
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


Exactly. Nail to the studs and get as close as you can. Shave the back, I guess, with a hand rasp or plane. If it is pine or another softwood it could splinter on you if you do not pre-drill for nails around high spot areas.

Set the nail heads. Fill the holes. And then prime the baseboards if you did not before putting them in place. Use a quality caulk to seal the space between the baseboard and wall. Prime the wall and caulk. Prime and paint the walls. Finish the trim.

Now if you have a sagging plaster fail where the baseboard is expected to reach around more than 1/4 inch or so max you have decisions to make. Anything you try to do with any baseboard in that situation is going to look strange.
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:19 PM   #6
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


Hi

1/16 gap in places when its held against the wall.

I like the idea of caulking, however i have some very nice wood finishing filler which would be ideal for this with sanding. What size of nails are used normally for this?
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:36 PM   #7
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


12 pennie, finishing nails, at a downward angle into the studs at the half inch top should work. I would pre-drill and put 16 pennie finish nails in the three quarter inch at the base.

Nailset the heads and you should be fine. Fill them over and off you go.

You going to need some quarter round or something to finish from your moulding to whatever your finish floor?
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:19 AM   #8
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


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12 pennie, finishing nails, at a downward angle into the studs at the half inch top should work. I would pre-drill and put 16 pennie finish nails in the three quarter inch at the base.

Nailset the heads and you should be fine. Fill them over and off you go.

You going to need some quarter round or something to finish from your moulding to whatever your finish floor?
I think 12(3 1/4") and 16(3 1/2") penny nails are a bit overkill for base molding. An 8 penny finish naill is fine for a wall with 1/2" sheetrock. If it's thick plaster, go to a 10 penny nail.
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Old 09-07-2011, 07:04 PM   #9
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Pine baseboards and not so straight walls


Hi

I have 2inch twisted finishing nails which i will try over the weekend.

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