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Old 08-16-2010, 02:13 PM   #1
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I am building a partition wall for a friend. Can I set the wall directly on the carpet? Also, the wall will not touch the cieling and he wants a double door in the wall. Any issues there?

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Old 08-16-2010, 03:12 PM   #2
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Normally a double door has a header, even if it is installed in a non-bearing wall. also needs solid studs on either side to install the door casing. If you do not go all the way to the ceiling, how are you planning to make the jamb stable?

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Old 08-16-2010, 04:35 PM   #3
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Walls on carpets are ill advised. It's something homeowners do who are, "uninformed".
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:51 PM   #4
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Let me clarify a little. I'm building an eight foot wall with a double door in it. The wall is in a room with a vaulted ceiling, it's a loft bedroom, and he doesn't want the wall to go all the way up. So the wall will attach on one end. Will it be sturdy enough? I'll cut the carpet out. Is it good enough to just glue the carpet down around the new wall?
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:40 AM   #5
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I don't think this scenario is safe or makes any sense. The wall is attached to the floor and one wall. It has 2 doors in it that will open and close causing the wall to move every time the door gets closed.
Why is it attached to only one wall?
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:50 AM   #6
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Also, partitioning off a portion of the bedroom may violate emergency egress requirements.
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Old 08-17-2010, 02:43 PM   #7
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The ceiling is sloping, so the wall will only be about six foot tall on that side. Plus the wall will have to make a dog leg to avoid a window on that side. I don't know how much support that will provide to the main part of the wall?
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Old 08-17-2010, 06:03 PM   #8
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Normally a wall that will house a double door is built very strongly, because the door can be opened rapidly, it can blow open, etc. Plus doors can be quite heavy. As I mentioned earlier, walls with doors normally have headers, which of course you can frame into a wall that does not reach the ceiling, but the wall will be far from stable, as it is attached only at the base and at one wall.

At best this is non-standard practice. As mentioned, there may be code violations here, I am not sure. This is likely a bad plan because the wall is not going to be stable, so if someone leans against it, or opens the door rapidly, or bumps the wall with a heavy object, the wall will move. Most of the strength of a standard wall comes from the fact that the studs are anchored at the top and bottom, which allows the entire wall to resist racking, twisting and bending. Partition walls in offices, which do not reach the ceiling, do not generally have doors in them, for precisely the reason that they are inherently unstable.
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Old 08-19-2010, 04:04 PM   #9
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Ok, I will run the wall to the ceiling. The wall will still have a double door in it. Can I build an eight foot wall and "balloon" frame the wall to the ceiling or do the studs need to be continuous from the floor to the ceiling?
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Old 08-19-2010, 05:26 PM   #10
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I think you have your terminology backwards. If you run the stud continuously to the ceiling, that is balloon framing. If you break the studs somewhere near the middle, that is platform framing. Either type of framing is perfectly acceptable provided you use standard framing practice, appropriate connectors, and correctly sized framing members. Balloon framing is uncommon in the current market because it is difficult to get very long studs.
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Old 08-19-2010, 06:49 PM   #11
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Thanx for all the help Daniel
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Old 08-22-2010, 01:13 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big rob View Post
Ok, I will run the wall to the ceiling. The wall will still have a double door in it. Can I build an eight foot wall and "balloon" frame the wall to the ceiling or do the studs need to be continuous from the floor to the ceiling?
How tall will the wall be to the ceiling?
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Old 08-22-2010, 06:47 PM   #13
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You need to stabilize the door frame in the wall. A perpendicular short wall close to the door or full height studs for rigidity and anti-flexing while the door is operational.

The new door may also require the existing window to be changed, meeting current safety Code: "The 2006 IRC calls for safety glazing when glazing "is in an individual fixed or operable panel adjacent to a door where the nearest vertical edge is within a 24-inch arc of the door in a closed position and whose bottom edge is less than 60 inches above the floor or walking surface."

"This section is not easily understood. Imagine attaching one end of a 24-inch-long string to the corner of the door jamb, then pulling the free end in a horizontal arc. Any glass less than 60 inches above the floor and within the reach of the string would need to be safety glazed." From:http://www.deckmagazine.com/article/54.html

Be safe, Gary

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