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oldhouseguy 09-06-2011 07:46 PM

Odd size lumber
 
I am a fairly handy guy.

I also sometimes get in over my head.

I felt I wanted to say those things first!

Anyway, I am new here.

I am working on an old garage built in the 1920's.

Around the rough opening of the large door, there are some 1x4 3/8 boards that trim the rough opening to exactly 10 feet wide.

I need to replace the two side boards and the top board.

I haven't really ever done this, but my question is, can I just take a 1x6 and use my table saw to cut the board down to 4 3/8? I will need to run a full 7 feet on the sides and 10 feet on the top.

I am just looking for any tips!

user1007 09-06-2011 08:12 PM

Confused just a bit and want to make sure.

You have pulled the trim off the door frame and now see the door frame itself right? The door and frame structure are fine and you just want to cut new trim to pimp it out and look pretty right? Old trim was rotting at corners or something? You are not talking about the 1920s real lumber members and the framing itself that actually frame the door?

Go for it. Cut the trim, nail it up and caulk it with anything but evil pure silicone.

What with. 10' is a bit of a span for a piece of trim. You will want to nail a 10' span an inch thick frequently along the span. If you can spring for it, I would use something like nice redwood, cedar, cypress or maybe one of the new synthetic materials since it is not structural.

oldhouseguy 09-06-2011 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 722692)
Confused just a bit and want to make sure.

You have pulled the trim off the door frame and now see the door frame itself right? The door and frame structure is fine and you just want to cut new trim to pimp it out and look pretty right? Old trim was rotting at corners or something? You are not talking about the 1920s real lumber members and the framing itself that actually frame the door?

Go for it. Cut the trim, nail it up and caulk it with anything but evil pure silicone.

Let me see if I can think of how to say this.

Most rough openings I have seen are made from 2x4s.

There is a 2x4 frame structure which is intact. So the rough opening is 2x4s.

THEN... around the 2x4s, which I guess also must actually measure 4 3/8, is a 1x4 3/8 board. It is like they were putting a veneer using 1 inch boards around the rough opening. Yes, the 1 inch veneer, for lack of a better word is rotten.

My main question is, is a table saw the right thing to use to trim a 6 inch board down to 4 3/8?

If I don't put this strange veneer board back in, the rough opening will be like 10 feet 2 inches wide and 7 feet 1 inch tall.

zircon 09-06-2011 08:47 PM

Sorry to hijack the thread but I saw the comment about evil pure silicone. I just bought a tube of pure white silicone to caulk windows that leaked during Irene. The other choice was acrylic with silicone. I haven't used it yet. What is wrong with pure silicone?

user1007 09-06-2011 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldhouseguy (Post 722705)
Let me see if I can think of how to say this.

Most rough openings I have seen are made from 2x4s.

There is a 2x4 frame structure which is intact. So the rough opening is 2x4s.

THEN... around the 2x4s, which I guess also must actually measure 4 3/8, is a 1x4 3/8 board. It is like they were putting a veneer using 1 inch boards around the rough opening. Yes, the 1 inch veneer, for lack of a better word is rotten.

My main question is, is a table saw the right thing to use to trim a 6 inch board down to 4 3/8?

If I don't put this strange veneer board back in, the rough opening will be like 10 feet 2 inches wide and 7 feet 1 inch tall.

Losing you now I think. Can you post a picture?

As for the tool to use to rip a 6" board down to 4 3/8" but by 10' long? I would turn to a table saw or a radial arm thing twisted with a good edge guard locked in place and friends holding the ends of the lumber as you pass the length along. Alternatively some saw horses would be nice.

Make sure you have a nice rip saw blade super sharp or a combo blade. This is just general advice. There was a combination sharpening shop and tax accounting place where I lived once. Never had them do my taxes but got hooked on dropping off drill bits, augers and saw blades. For like a buck each all mine cut perfectly. And my finds of things people forgot to pick up and were mine for like $2 is unbelievable.

Super sharp tools are the safest tools. And if you screw up the dull ones will take a hand off really fast without you having to explain to the emergency room why you have a Skil Saw stuck in your upper arm. Battery operated and still running.

Rob1975 09-06-2011 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zircon (Post 722730)
Sorry to hijack the thread but I saw the comment about evil pure silicone. I just bought a tube of pure white silicone to caulk windows that leaked during Irene. The other choice was acrylic with silicone. I haven't used it yet. What is wrong with pure silicone?

The only thing that I can think of is for painting. He is replacing trim so it will need to be painted. I don't even like the acrylic with silicone when painting. I usually get Painters Choice 100% Silicone FREE!!! If I am weatherproofing and will never paint, I use 100% Silicone. I try to stay away from the acrylic is it is going to be left exposed, it will shrink and does not stand up as well to the weather. Just my opinion!

oldhouseguy 09-06-2011 09:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 722737)
Losing you now I think. Can you post a picture?

As for the tool to use to rip a 6" board down to 4 3/8" but by 10' long? I would turn to a table saw or a radial arm thing twisted with a good edge guard locked in place and friends holding the ends of the lumber as you pass the length along. Alternatively some saw horses would be nice.

Make sure you have a nice rip saw blade super sharp or a combo blade. This is just general advice. There was a combination sharpening shop and tax accounting place where I lived once. Never had them do my taxes but got hooked on dropping off drill bits, augers and saw blades. For like a buck each all mine cut perfectly. And my finds of things people forgot to pick up and were mine for like $2 is unbelievable.

Super sharp tools are the safest tools. And if you screw up the dull ones will take a hand off really fast without you having to explain to the emergency room why you have a Skil Saw stuck in your upper arm. Battery operated and still running.

I can try to post a picture tomorrow, just to show you what I have obviously failed to describe!

I am very concerned about losing a hand, because I, oddly enough, was only born with two. The table saw I have has a nice edge guard that locks really nicely. It's an old school Craftsman that was my dad's.

I have been known to be deadly accurate with a 5 1/4 circular saw, but I can not go straight for ten feet, chalkline or not.

TrapperL 09-06-2011 09:37 PM

Sounds like to me you're either trying to make a door jamb or a cased opening out of 1x 6 ripped. We do it all the time if that's what you're trying to do.

oldhouseguy 09-06-2011 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrapperL (Post 722766)
Sounds like to me you're either trying to make a door jamb or a cased opening out of 1x 6 ripped. We do it all the time if that's what you're trying to do.

Ok, I agree that is what I am trying to do!!!

Is a table saw the best way then?

TrapperL 09-06-2011 09:53 PM

Table saw has worked good enough over the last 40 years. Just take it slow and make sure the blade is sharp so you get a nice smooth cut. A palm sander can also give great results on rough cuts from a table saw if you need a real good surface.

oh'mike 09-06-2011 09:56 PM

Yes--use the table saw--rig up a long out feed table so the work piece is supported as it leaves the blade.

Kind of dangerous if you don't.

user1007 09-06-2011 10:21 PM

Like I think I said. Just have friends on the feed and tail end to support the 10 foot length.

You got this Bubba. Quit playing us.

oldhouseguy 09-08-2011 10:51 AM

I am sure everyone is frantic and wondering what happened!

After further inspection, the "jamb" concept posted above is exactly what I was building.

The 2x4 studs on the rough opening have a 4 3/8 board over them in order to sit flush against the clapboard siding for the outer trim around the garage door opening.

I pried it all off.

Used the trusty table saw to rip the 1x6's down to 1x4 3/8's

I really don't enjoy cutting boards down like that on a table saw, I was just hoping there would be some better way.

Using that freaking saw just seems like something that wants to take an arm off at some point. I took it slow, was using a very sharp blade and thankfully it was pretty easy.

I truly appreciate your responses!

user1007 09-08-2011 11:13 AM

Nice work. You should respect the dangers of saws and fast spinning saw blades. You did it right.

BigJim 09-08-2011 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldhouseguy (Post 723717)
I am sure everyone is frantic and wondering what happened!

After further inspection, the "jamb" concept posted above is exactly what I was building.

The 2x4 studs on the rough opening have a 4 3/8 board over them in order to sit flush against the clapboard siding for the outer trim around the garage door opening.

I pried it all off.

Used the trusty table saw to rip the 1x6's down to 1x4 3/8's

I really don't enjoy cutting boards down like that on a table saw, I was just hoping there would be some better way.

Using that freaking saw just seems like something that wants to take an arm off at some point. I took it slow, was using a very sharp blade and thankfully it was pretty easy.

I truly appreciate your responses!

I know what you mean, I had a 3 HP shaper and running a 6 or 7 inch diameter cutter sounded like a blame jet warming up. The thoughts of my getting my fingers that close to that cutter was more than I was willing to do so I sold that sucker, end of story.


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