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JoJo#7 10-13-2012 04:46 PM

Oak door
 
Hello
My son-in-law recently installed my interior oak door and messed up! :(
He bored the hole for the doorknob and hung it upside down and backwards. This door is for the main floor bathroom and it has a glass inset with the outside of the glass being rippled (which faces the hallway). How can the door be fixed if the doorknob hole is in the wrong place?
Or can it be fixed?

joecaption 10-13-2012 04:50 PM

Not likly and not show but post a picture, were not there to see it.

woodworkbykirk 10-13-2012 08:18 PM

it can be done. it means fixing the hinge gains and getting a stainless steel door plate for the handle to cover the old hole. its common in commercial consruction.. not for the knob to be drilled wrong but the plate

joecaption 10-13-2012 08:29 PM

Not a great look for an inside door.

cleveman 10-13-2012 10:10 PM

Just drill a bunch of holes in the door and fill them with contrasting walnut plugs.

Yes, I may be a genius.

funfool 10-14-2012 05:25 PM

I have to agree with cleveman here. But a sense of humour is important.
And I have to agree.
Really lets look at your options. You have a door upside down and backwards.
Lets give the kid some credit, only way to do this is by ordering a blank and not a pre-hung door.

In reality, is more skills needed to install a blank, it is possible to make this mistake.
I am sure the son inlaw feels bad about it.
I bet he learn a lesson that he will not repeat, But really, what are your options?
I bet if you order a new blank, tell him to make it right, he will not mess up and make it perfect.

Years ago I made a similar mistake, I always double check now.
But really we all make mistakes, be glad it was on you and not got him fired and affect your daughter and Grand babies.

JoJo#7 10-15-2012 08:10 PM

backwards & upside down oak door
 
1 Attachment(s)
Yes, the son-in-law feels bad about the mess up, but I still love him nevertheless, and he says it's a lesson learned!
Attachment 58892
Thanks for all the suggestions ... really do appreciate it! :thumbup:

funfool 10-15-2012 10:00 PM

I honestly cant think of a good solution, You know it is upside down, if I were invited into your home and used your bathroom, I would chuckle about it and know it is upside down.
But how many guest in your home are carpenters and would know it was upside down?
Maybe we can declare it a new style and was designed that way?
It does look ok in the photo, nice tight fit and looks clean.
I do not know what effect the rippled glass being on the wrong side will cause, assume is only cosmetic.

If you called me out to look at this and fix it. I would have to suggest a new door.
Once you turn it over and flip it around, put the hardware in correct location which would be on the other side of the door.

Only possible way I can think of saving that door, is to re skin it.
Will be a material made for this at the big box stores or others, will add 1/8" to each side 1/4" total, hinges and or door stops will need to be moved.
Really can be labour intensive to do this, Also will sharpen the son inlaw skills :laughing:

Again, for me or another carpenter to come out I charge $65 per hour, it would be cheaper to buy a new door.
But if you have the time and skills, could skin it.

Duckweather 10-16-2012 03:01 PM

[quote=funfool;1031729]I
Only possible way I can think of saving that door, is to re skin it.
Will be a material made for this at the big box stores or others, will add 1/8" to each side 1/4" total, hinges and or door stops will need to be moved.
Really can be labour intensive to do this, Also will sharpen the son inlaw skills

Try a custom cabinet shop for oak veneer. it is only about 1/16" thick that would only add 1/8" and you might be able to re position the hinges. With caution, contact cement, (the real stuff, lacquer base), would probably be the best adhesive. You roll it, not clamp it, but you can't move it once it makes contact.

hand drive 10-19-2012 07:33 AM

How about a 2 1/2" or 3" round rosette or something like that put over the hole once the door is flipped over. the knob bore hole is 2 1'8" so a 2 1/2" would work. Maybe consider 3 put on that side of the door, one in the (sort of middle ) covering the hole and one at the top and bottom to make it look symmetrical. It is just a way to salvage a nice door and not have to get a new one, doors are not cheap.

BTW, home improvement stores carry some of the little decorative trim pieces. they are in the decorative trim section and the stair parts section

zakany 10-19-2012 03:20 PM

Or you can leave it as-is and call it European-style or something. First one on your block with such a fancy, foo-foo door.

hand drive 10-20-2012 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zakany (Post 1034086)
Or you can leave it as-is and call it European-style or something. First one on your block with such a fancy, foo-foo door.


left as is the glass is susceptible to breakage do to unaware foot activity(kicking). the glass could be tempered though as it is a full light glass door but doubtful.

oh'mike 10-20-2012 09:19 AM

That should have come with tempered glass----if bought in the USA or Canada---so I would not be to concerned about breakage---

I would just reverse the glass so the good side faces the right direction and leave it alone---

It will drive you mad---but I bet no living soul will ever notice that the door is upside down---(unless you point it out)

shazapple 10-20-2012 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1033809)
How about a 2 1/2" or 3" round rosette or something like that put over the hole once the door is flipped over. the knob bore hole is 2 1'8" so a 2 1/2" would work. Maybe consider 3 put on that side of the door, one in the (sort of middle ) covering the hole and one at the top and bottom to make it look symmetrical. It is just a way to salvage a nice door and not have to get a new one, doors are not cheap.

BTW, home improvement stores carry some of the little decorative trim pieces. they are in the decorative trim section and the stair parts section

Instead of the rosette you could install an 'indicator deadbolt' like so
http://www.qualifiedhardware.com/bra...dbolt-1609.cfm

It may never get used except by guests, but it would be an interesting feature and could make it look like it was done on purpose!

Edit: or you could cover the hole with a rosette and put a keyhole cover in the middle to make it look like a lock without the functionality.

hand drive 10-20-2012 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shazapple (Post 1034509)
Instead of the rosette you could install an 'indicator deadbolt' like so
http://www.qualifiedhardware.com/bra...dbolt-1609.cfm

It may never get used except by guests, but it would be an interesting feature and could make it look like it was done on purpose!

Edit: or you could cover the hole with a rosette and put a keyhole cover in the middle to make it look like a lock without the functionality.


do you know if the indicator deadbolt has a 2 1/8" bore hole, could have 1 5/8" bore hole?


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