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Old 07-22-2009, 11:05 AM   #1
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New House Frames


All,
I just bought a house which itís build at the moment.
The constructor allowed me to go inside anytime to check on the things done. What its worried a lot now its that I see the wood used for the frame that it has a different color like its not a new wood. See pictures below.

Also they had some studs(twobyfours) that where broken small parts from them missing and they have doubled them but one of them its saw and in my view can break anytime.
Also from that stud that its cuts you can see that half that the wood its half grey and half the color of a natural wood. I think half of the wood change color and its now looks like the grey one.

Can someone let me know if I should start worrying about this?


Thanks
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Old 07-22-2009, 12:02 PM   #2
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New House Frames


I have concerns that the sole plate has been left exposed to standing water to long. I noticed in the picture it looked wet on the edge. I'm assuming the house isn't dried in yet. The stud with the tear out should not have been used. Typically those are cut up and the good parts are used as blocking. It's the same for the studs with cuts in them. Looks like sloppy framing to me. I would check your stringers too. I would bet they over cut them. Most likely the building inspector will have them correct these things.

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Old 07-22-2009, 12:31 PM   #3
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Looks as though the lumber grade is of a lesser quality that I'm used to. The sole plate is showing bark, which is acceptable if the grade stamp is suitable for your building department. The studs are a lesser grade also, possibly utility grade not construction grade,can you post a picture of the grade (ink) stamp on a stud? Also, a picture of the inside corner again, but from farther back to check the nailing pattern? The sawn stud should not have been used, it is not structural in it's weaken state. A sister stud would suffice added next to it. Be safe, G
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Old 07-22-2009, 02:18 PM   #4
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Yes, I noticed the wane too, but it still looks wet to me. It may just be dote though. If it's not stamped or stamped incorrectly for the application it won't pass. That one they usually check for (at least they always have on anything I've ever done) during the framing inspection. They won't check every single one but they will randomly look at them. After looking at it again I noticed a spiral nail. May just be random but you may want verify their using the proper nails. I have seen some crews try to cut costs that way. Those are usually .119 diameter. Most framing activities call for .131-.162 diameter depending on the application. Inspector may or may not catch that. I've had them ask me what I used before, but they never had me pull any to verify it.
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Old 07-22-2009, 03:50 PM   #5
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The color of the wood does not concern me. Looks like mineral staining which is not uncommon in many species of softwood. The bluish-gray color is normal. If the entire piece were that color I might suspect water damage.

The cuts in the framing are sloppy and are not on par with decent work. Contact your builder regarding these deficiencies. If they do not address them I'd consider parting ways...If they won't stand behind their product during construction they certainly won't after the home is done and they're paid.
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Old 07-22-2009, 04:23 PM   #6
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Thanks for all replies.
I had meeting today with the manager that its in charge with the building and he said that some of the nails that are showing there will be taken care before the inspection that will be done by the city inspectors.
The windows frame with issues have been replaced today before they installed the windows.

In regards with the stud that its cut(and it was use to double the other one with problems) he told me that that its normal but reading the replies I started to be concerned again. Should I get someone that works in constructions to look at these studs?

In regards with the edge of the frame that looks wet that frame its all dried.

I know that when they did the framing for the first floor its started to rain and it rain for couple of hours. They did the second level next morning.

So could that raing damadge the edges that look like that or they might be like that from the begining.

All the studs and frames have stamps on them. I'll get pictures in the couple of days when I get there again.

Its good to know that the color of the wood its not a concern.

Thanks
Cristian
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Old 07-22-2009, 04:27 PM   #7
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Mnay, many homes get rained on before they get dried in. Although unfortunate, it happens all the time and is normally not a major concern provided they're allowed to dry out before getting insulated, rocked, etc.

Be aware that not all lumber is beautiful or has 4 clean edges. Most stud grades of lumber allow a waned edge (bark edge), knots, etc. As stated, the color of the wood has little or no bearing on its integrity.
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Old 07-22-2009, 04:37 PM   #8
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Thanks. Well I hope these edges will get dried. I can't tell if they are wet or not.

In regards with the edges I know that nothing its perfect. So there always be some studs or frames where the edges are not perfect.

What has upset me a little bit it’s that the house that its build next door has only few things that I encountered.
I hope that the city inspector will do his job properly and he will find any issues that might cause problems later.

I'm thinking that will be good to get another home inspector to do a check before the drywall its done. Will this be worth it or I'll probably get the same answers like from the city inspector.

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Old 07-22-2009, 06:20 PM   #9
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What's the picture with the bluish cloth & the board with all the cuts in it?
Is that the window framing that was replaced?
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Old 07-22-2009, 06:36 PM   #10
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I have recommended in other posts for people to hire a home inspector on general contractor to look at things on their behalf. As long as you schedule visits to the site when it will not affect production and and any issues that may affect the builders insurance policy are addressed a reputable builder should not have an issue with this.

KC is correctly stated that many homes do get rained on before they are dried in. He also correctly stated that as long as they are allowed to dry out it is not usually a problem. What can be a problem is water left pooled in the structure for prolonged periods. As long as this is not occurring I would concur with these statements. My concern was the wood looked saturated on the wall side but that could be the wane playing tricks on my eyes as wanes to commonly look wet. Either way if you have real concerns about moisture a moisture meter can identify any possible issues.
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Old 07-23-2009, 09:52 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
What's the picture with the bluish cloth & the board with all the cuts in it?
Is that the window framing that was replaced?
Yes. That was the one. It has been replaced yesterday.
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Old 07-23-2009, 09:57 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by ARI001 View Post
I have recommended in other posts for people to hire a home inspector on general contractor to look at things on their behalf. As long as you schedule visits to the site when it will not affect production and and any issues that may affect the builders insurance policy are addressed a reputable builder should not have an issue with this.

KC is correctly stated that many homes do get rained on before they are dried in. He also correctly stated that as long as they are allowed to dry out it is not usually a problem. What can be a problem is water left pooled in the structure for prolonged periods. As long as this is not occurring I would concur with these statements. My concern was the wood looked saturated on the wall side but that could be the wane playing tricks on my eyes as wanes to commonly look wet. Either way if you have real concerns about moisture a moisture meter can identify any possible issues.
Well now the house has a roof for about 1 week or so. Also there was no rain in the last week or so and the weather was warm.
I'll check again this week to see if its still the same.
I've a friend that worked in constructions too and he will check it out this weekend.
Also I found a company that its doing house inspections and they said that can do a punch list before the pre-drywall meeting.
The price of their services was low $150 so this will be a well spend money.

Thanks Cristian
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Old 07-23-2009, 11:44 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by mcristian72 View Post
Also I found a company that its doing house inspections and they said that can do a punch list before the pre-drywall meeting.
The price of their services was low $150 so this will be a well spend money.
For that price I'd have serious reservations and would be checking some credentials....A rough-in inspection with electrical, HVAC, plumbing and framing is a very tedious inspection and it is definitely the most important inspection your home will receive. If I were doing side work I wouldn't touch it for $150.

Why don't you communicate your concerns to the building official in your town, just to make sure that your home receives the attention that you feel it needs during the inspection process. People commonly contact me and ask that I keep an eye on certain aspects of their homes that have them concerned. I'm thorough, but realize that there are inspectors out there that tend to just hand out approvals instead of giving the projects the scrutiny the permit holder is paying for.
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:45 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Why don't you communicate your concerns to the building official in your town, just to make sure that your home receives the attention that you feel it needs during the inspection process. People commonly contact me and ask that I keep an eye on certain aspects of their homes that have them concerned. I'm thorough, but realize that there are inspectors out there that tend to just hand out approvals instead of giving the projects the scrutiny the permit holder is paying for.
Thanks. I'll try to contact the town officials and see what they can do.
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Old 07-24-2009, 11:19 PM   #15
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In regards to the 2nd picture, the one with the stud cut and a shim put in place then nailed.... that my friend is one way to straighten a bowed stud, they teach that in carpentry, that is common practice, but what isn't common practice is to use your window sill as a saw horse as these framers did(must have been a friday)

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