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Old 04-25-2013, 11:03 AM   #1
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Need to redo back fence


I'm dealing with wood, so I guess this belongs here.

So, I live in a townhouse in a suburban housing development. As such, the backyard fence is crap. My family can't really afford to replace the entire thing, so as the family DIY-er, it's up to me to fix it.

The main problem is that some of the boards have warped, curving upwards and dislodging the boards that are supposed to keep them from doing exactly that. There's also a lot of mold that needs to get scrubbed off. The lock on the back gate is also in need of replacing-- it's rusty and practically falling off. And then the entire thing needs to be re-stained-- the stain the builders used is practically gone now, and the fence is gray where the sun hits it (which is practically everywhere).

So, I guess my question is what would be the best lumber to get to replace the boards that need replacing? This is probably going to be the last time we do this, so I want to get something that won't warp, won't grow mold, and will keep its color after staining, and that's relatively affordable. The stain has to be weather-proof as well, so I need something that doesn't need to be re-applied every summer.

Any ideas?

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Old 04-25-2013, 05:56 PM   #2
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Need to redo back fence


Wood that doesn't warp, grow mold and keeps it's color after staining and isn't expensive? Hmmm.... Not sure that exists. Maybe this needs to be looked at a different way:

1. Mold issue: I assume you mean wood that doesn't rot, weathers well and won't be a mold issue in a wet area. Mold I can't help you with, the other 2 are easy. Go with Pressure Treated Exterior Lumber. It's made for decks, fences, posts, sheds and pretty much anything else you have for outside use but it's not cheap. That's not to say it's super expensive but your going to get what you pay for and pressure treated is going to give you the most bang for your buck.

2. Warp: All wood can and will warp under certain conditions, the type of wood it is means it's more susceptible (like the sap wood of a gum tree) or less susceptible to warping. Best suggestion any of us can give you is to screw the boards together using deck screws, not drywall screws (as drywall screws will rust/corrode) and to secure them well.

3. Stain you don't have to redo every year. Okay, how about every 3 years? There are stains out there that you can use that will give you a good finish for a few years but none are going to give you a great finish permanently.

If you never want to touch this fence again perhaps you need to look at some of the vinyl fences on the market. More money up front but in the end it'll cost less than if you have to keep redoing the fence, depending on how long you live there. I'll let someone else recommend the best stains from their experience.

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Old 04-25-2013, 11:34 PM   #3
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Need to redo back fence


Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaDoAReno
I'm dealing with wood, so I guess this belongs here.

So, I live in a townhouse in a suburban housing development. As such, the backyard fence is crap. My family can't really afford to replace the entire thing, so as the family DIY-er, it's up to me to fix it.

The main problem is that some of the boards have warped, curving upwards and dislodging the boards that are supposed to keep them from doing exactly that. There's also a lot of mold that needs to get scrubbed off. The lock on the back gate is also in need of replacing-- it's rusty and practically falling off. And then the entire thing needs to be re-stained-- the stain the builders used is practically gone now, and the fence is gray where the sun hits it (which is practically everywhere).

So, I guess my question is what would be the best lumber to get to replace the boards that need replacing? This is probably going to be the last time we do this, so I want to get something that won't warp, won't grow mold, and will keep its color after staining, and that's relatively affordable. The stain has to be weather-proof as well, so I need something that doesn't need to be re-applied every summer.

Any ideas?
Can you post a few pics so we can see what you're talking about?
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