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Old 10-22-2009, 11:09 PM   #1
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Moving a wall


I'm moving my kitchen wall three feet into the dinning room. My wife wants a bigger kitchen and could care less about the dinning room. The wall I'm moving is not a load bearing wall. I'm wondering if it is necessary to remove the half inch ceiling dry wall, or can I just nail the top plate through the drywall into the ceiling joist? Thanks.

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Old 10-23-2009, 07:53 AM   #2
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Moving a wall


Why not just open it all the way up.

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Old 10-23-2009, 09:45 AM   #3
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Moving a wall


I'm doing the same thing to add a fireplace insert and some built-ins and have the same question. Is there a good visual reference for this? What's the standard for attaching the sides to the existing wall studs?

Also, the floor is a floating laminate, I'm assuming that it would be a bad idea to screw the bottom plate through that, right?
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Old 10-23-2009, 04:20 PM   #4
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Moving a wall


I could expose the whole area, but it would take more work and create a bigger mess, but if it is necessary, I will do it. I'm just trying to find out the best way to go about do this.

About the floating floor--I would definitely remove the floor before putting down the bottom plate. If you nailed down the bottom plate to the floor, the floor would no longer being able to move with the moisture in the air from season to season causing the floor to buckle. I put down a plywood sub floor over cement before putting down the floating floor. Not thinking I butted the plywood edges together. Within a month the floor buckled. The floating floor was fine, but the plywood sub floor buckled because I did not allow for expansion.
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Old 10-27-2009, 07:57 AM   #5
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Moving a wall


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Originally Posted by sluggermike View Post
I could expose the whole area, but it would take more work and create a bigger mess, but if it is necessary, I will do it. I'm just trying to find out the best way to go about do this.

About the floating floor--I would definitely remove the floor before putting down the bottom plate. If you nailed down the bottom plate to the floor, the floor would no longer being able to move with the moisture in the air from season to season causing the floor to buckle. I put down a plywood sub floor over cement before putting down the floating floor. Not thinking I butted the plywood edges together. Within a month the floor buckled. The floating floor was fine, but the plywood sub floor buckled because I did not allow for expansion.

So what would the best option be here....to cut out the portion of the laminate floor and install the sole plate directly to the subfloor?
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Old 10-27-2009, 08:32 AM   #6
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Moving a wall


I removed and moved three walls in kitchen. Ended up removing the entire ceiling to access electrical, plumbing and lighting free standing hood.

Doing another kitchen now and have loose drywall where I removed wall. I have to put in backing or shore up some how.

The issue is how are you going to deal with the patch. If you move wall 3 feet, why nor remove 3 foot 6 inch, build wall with standard double top plate and then put in a larger piece of drywall that you can hang and float for a seamless finish.
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Old 11-16-2009, 01:24 PM   #7
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Moving a wall


I'm sorry, I did not respond to the questions about the laminated floor. I suspect that you have already taken care of it, but if you haven't, I would attach the sole plate directly to the sub floor. My concern would be that your "floating floor" would not be "floating" anymore. I'm just a DIY guy and so I maybe wrong, but that's my "two cents worth".

I moved the wall as planned. I removed the drywall back to the ceiling joists and then nailed two two by fours on top of each with and an offset of one half of the bottom board. I nailed the offset boards to the ceiling joists. The upper board will be used to attach the drywall. By doing it this way I did not disturb the ceiling drywall in the other room.

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