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Beermoney 02-19-2007 09:30 PM

Moving studs in load bearing wall
 
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I am building a home theater in my basement and want to take advantage of the dead space under the staircase to store my audio rack. When I removed the drywall I found several studs that will need to be moved. I need to create a 22" opening to insert my audio rack in.

My plan is to remove the two studs to 22" apart to enlarge the hole. I am also planning to install a double 2X6 header at the top and remove the bottom plate as the rack will roll in and out of this space. Does this sound reasonable?

I have attached a picture of the damaage so far :thumbsup:

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

AtlanticWBConst. 02-20-2007 04:53 AM

Go for it,

If that staircase is framed properly, then those studs are not supporting anything, but are there for the sheetrock to be attached to.
In other words, that should not a load bearing wall....
Check to make sure that the stairs are properly attached at the top where the stringers meet the floor joists.

Beermoney 02-20-2007 08:38 PM

Thanks. I will take a look to see if the stringers are attached at the top of the stairs. I was concerned becasue there is a set of 4 studs on the right (only two are showing). Would they have put 4 studs in one place just to hang sheetrock?

Thanks again for thr reply.

AtlanticWBConst. 02-20-2007 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beermoney (Post 34174)
Thanks. I will take a look to see if the stringers are attached at the top of the stairs. I was concerned becasue there is a set of 4 studs on the right (only two are showing). Would they have put 4 studs in one place just to hang sheetrock?

Thanks again for thr reply.

Check those out. I saw that in your pic (the double studs on the right) ...that is why I suggested that you look at and examine how your stair case is supported...

There is the right way...and then, every now and then, ...sadly...the wrong way.
Example: We recently got called in to finish up a new construction home this past November. The area to be finished off was the entire 2nd floor and the stair well leading to it. The stairwell was located in the breezeway structure between the garage and the residence...
I have NEVER seen a stairway built like this in my life...UGH.
The HO had a dear friend who built it ....(She called him a: "Handy man and Master Carpenter")

...Unfortunately, the Local Town Building Inspector didn't agree with that title when he rejected the stair case build and even wrote on the permit: "Terrible Work"....

...She later found the 'alleged'.... "Master"...... 'cracked out' , deep in the woods, in back of the house .... and subsequently fired him....

Anyways.....That is why I say to check and see how the stairwell was supported (you never know exactly how they were actually built and supported)....Regarding your design with the header....You should still be able to do what you want to do. I think that your idea to basically install Jacks & kings...may be a good precautionary method....Those stairs are all the weight involved that you need to support (you are not supporting floors above). The stringers supports all the horizontal and diagonal weight load of the stairs, so there is no need to install a structural type header, tho, a normal opening type header would be standard for such an opening....

Beermoney 02-21-2007 07:43 AM

OK. That makes a lot of sense.

Thanks a lot!

BM


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