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Old 12-08-2010, 04:48 PM   #1
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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood


I think I finally fixed a leak in which my stucco house was leaking through a crack by the roof. I took out the sheetrock and pulled out some wet insulation. Part of the plywood has rotted (see attached picture). I am not sure if I need to fix it as it is only about a 2'x2' section that is rotted. I also beleive to replace it I will need to have the stucco removed first, which is very expensive. Any ideas?

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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood-rsz_2dscn0526-1-.jpg  

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Old 12-08-2010, 07:32 PM   #2
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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood


Most qualified Stucco repair companies that do quality work can patch and blend any removed Stucco with good results . The most important thing here is to not put a banaid on the problem but cure it. Find out why, when and where the water is gettting behind the Stucco. Then focus your repair to solving the problem.

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Old 12-08-2010, 09:55 PM   #3
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Most qualified Stucco repair companies that do quality work can patch and blend any removed Stucco with good results . The most important thing here is to not put a banaid on the problem but cure it. Find out why, when and where the water is gettting behind the Stucco. Then focus your repair to solving the problem.
I am not trying a bandaid approach. I've had several roofers look at the problem--I've had flashing redone, shingles fixed--all to no avail. Today a roofer did some caulking and then tested the area with a hose for 20 minutes. No leak. I will wait for the next hard rain before declaring victory. But my question was assuming the leak is fixed, what do I do with the rotted plywood without having to remove the stucco? Or do I need to remove the stucco?
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:51 PM   #4
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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood


Remove the stucco as the caulking will not solve the problem. Stucco is a water reservoir siding, it holds water. The building paper/house wrap has been compromised, hence the wet ply sheathing. The mold spores are inactive now until water from outside or moisture vapor from inside activates it again, remove/replace the ply. The crack with caulking should be re-stuccoed. Anything less is a band-aid.

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Old 12-09-2010, 12:59 AM   #5
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I am just a roofers brother but I can tell you caulk on a roof is never the answer even if it stops the leak.
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Old 12-09-2010, 03:53 PM   #6
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I am just a roofers brother but I can tell you caulk on a roof is never the answer even if it stops the leak.
I agree. The roofer redid the step flashing and thought he fixed it. But I noticed the rotted wood was very modestly damp after a hard rain, which made me think the step flashing was not the problem (or didn't entirely fix it). That's when the roofer came back to caulk, ran a water line test, and couldn't replicate the leak. My only other thought was that there is something wrong with the gutter (although the roofer says it looks fine). I have a gutter company coming out on Monday. If that checks out ok, I really am at a loss as to the problem.
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Old 12-09-2010, 08:05 PM   #7
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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood


"leak in which my stucco house was leaking through a crack by the roof." --- So the crack is not on the house? Pictures would help, and less confusing--- it doesn't take much these days.......lol.

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Old 12-09-2010, 08:29 PM   #8
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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood


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Originally Posted by novive View Post
I am not trying a bandaid approach. I've had several roofers look at the problem--I've had flashing redone, shingles fixed--all to no avail. Today a roofer did some caulking and then tested the area with a hose for 20 minutes. No leak. I will wait for the next hard rain before declaring victory. But my question was assuming the leak is fixed, what do I do with the rotted plywood without having to remove the stucco? Or do I need to remove the stucco?
You need to remove the stucco. You have no other choice.
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Old 12-13-2010, 03:35 PM   #9
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You need to remove the stucco. You have no other choice.
I had a gutter person over today, and spoke with the roofer again. It looks like what happened was that the caulking between the endpoint of the gutter and the stucco was very minorly cracked. The roofer re-caulked it and I will wait to see what happens when it rains again.

I will get the stucco and plywood redone as per everyone's suggestion, once it rains to test this fix.

I asked the gutter person if there was another way around caulking between the gutter and stucco and he said no. My worry is that everyone on this board tells me caulking is a bandaid. What is the permenant solution?
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Old 12-13-2010, 03:37 PM   #10
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"leak in which my stucco house was leaking through a crack by the roof." --- So the crack is not on the house? Pictures would help, and less confusing--- it doesn't take much these days.......lol.

Gary
I will take a picture for you--sorry for the confusion but thanks for the help. As I inidcated, I heard from the roofer that the crack was in the caulking connecting the gutter to the stucco siding.
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Old 12-13-2010, 05:28 PM   #11
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leak (hopefully fixed), some rotten wood


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It looks like what happened was that the caulking between the endpoint of the gutter and the stucco was very minorly cracked... What is the permanent solution?
Sounds like you may need 1) A separation between the end of the gutter and an adjacent wall and 2) a kick out flashing to divert water into the gutter, see the discussions of kick out flashings and stucco walls here: Kick out flashings help prevent gutter leaks into stucco walls Paragon Inspection Services Chicago/Northbrook/Glenview

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Also I agree with the other posters here that if water is getting to the sheathing the water resistant barrier behind the stucco has been compromised, and even if the sealant is a temporary fix,once it starts to fail water will again penetrate the wall.

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BTW, is that sheathing original to the structure, or was it installed as part of a previous repair. If the latter, whoever performed the repair may not have installed a water resistant barrier, or may have installed one improperly.

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Last edited by Michael Thomas; 12-13-2010 at 05:35 PM.
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