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Old 01-18-2012, 04:37 PM   #1
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding




I have a 16 foot window group. A 3,10, and a 3 foot window. Im looking to try my hand at the craftsman style moulding. I'd like it to look like this photo (http://www.google.com/imgres?q=craft...:0&tx=64&ty=67

Between the window are studs from 4 to 4 inches that I am using a 1 x 6, ripped to 4 and then sanding down to make flush.

My plan: I was going to run the trim between the windows, from the bottom stool to the top of the inside of the window. (leaving about inch at the top) Once the middle (between the windows) are complete. I was going to use 1 x3s on each end. Then top all the windows across the top with rounded trim. Then another 1x4 with crown and return on each end.

I am on the right track.

Sorry I didn't know how to resize my pic.

Thanks again for all your help on the site.

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Old 01-18-2012, 07:35 PM   #2
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


So what help do you need (the subject says "help")?

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Old 01-18-2012, 07:54 PM   #3
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


Sounds like you have a good handle on it. What type of wood you using?
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:58 PM   #4
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


Craftsman style should be simple and white oak trim not pine.
http://www.craftsmanperspective.com/
There's many books with examples of Craftsman style homes inside and out.

Last edited by joecaption; 01-18-2012 at 08:03 PM.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:02 PM   #5
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


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Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Craftsman style should be simple and white oak trim not pine.

I would have t agree with that.

Though, Redwood was often used on the inside as well as white oak.

Andy.
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Old 01-19-2012, 07:24 AM   #6
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


Thanks I just wanted to make sure I was on the right track. Can you tell me the major difference between pine and oak. This will all be primed and painted gloss white.


Thanks again for all your help

Chip
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:19 AM   #7
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


Quote:
Originally Posted by chipraynor View Post
Thanks I just wanted to make sure I was on the right track. Can you tell me the major difference between pine and oak. This will all be primed and painted gloss white.


Thanks again for all your help

Chip
If it's painted, I'd go with poplar. Much easier to work and cheaper plus fewer defects than even select pine
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:23 AM   #8
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


Quote:
Originally Posted by chipraynor View Post
Thanks I just wanted to make sure I was on the right track. Can you tell me the major difference between pine and oak. This will all be primed and painted gloss white.


Thanks again for all your help

Chip
Pine is a conifer, soft wood, sap wood, lighter, less dense, most common used wood because of its fast growth, often painted rather than stained because it doesnt take stains well unless dried fully and pores opened using a "softener" (water). If used as a raw wood for accent it is normally sealed, can have nice accents due to beetle and bird activity creating dark spots in the wood. Good for a rustic finish.

Oak is a pulp, hard wood, heavier, more dense, typically used for its nice grain pattern and stained, sealed or waxed to highlight and accent. Great tight grain patterns and details causing dark and light patterns in the same wood. More refined look, its a travisty to paint oak, much like dumping a good bottle of alcohol down the drain.

If you are going for true craftsman you dont paint the wood and its usually a good hardwood with nice detail. If you are planning to paint, just go with pine and dont call it craftsman.
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Old 01-19-2012, 11:43 AM   #9
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


It's craftsman if it's that profile and design. Does not matter of it's painted or not. Yes, much original trim from that period was stained oak but not all of it by any stretch.

Use pine. Cheaper and you can more easily find the profiles you'll want.

Here's an example of a very similar style in my house. This is in our living room which I'm currently renovating:



The width between your windows is going to determine the dimensions of the rest of your trim. Ideally you want a 1/4" reveal from the trim to the casing on each side. The middle trim piece(s) between the windows then determines the width of the trim on each side, more or less. The detail piece above the vertical trim can be 3/8" x 2" mullion ripped down to the proper depth and mounted with the curve down. Then your build up, probably 1x6, then the architrave like WM-53. The important relationship is between the vertical trim and the crown build up. Make sure the build up is taller than the trim is wide.
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Old 01-19-2012, 01:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
The middle trim piece(s) between the windows then determines the width of the trim on each side, more or less.
Not sure I agree with this.. Not saying its wrong but if the rest of the house has 1x4 casing and the windows have a wider casing it would look off to me. Good advice on the header at least being bigger than the casing. Only other thing I would do different would be hang the parting bead past the header/casing 3/4" on each side( like I said not wrong just personal preferace). Im doing a job now with the exact same detail... I'll get a pic when I can get back to work. Stuck in this ice storm in the Pacific Northwest.
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Old 01-19-2012, 02:52 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by RTRCon View Post
Not sure I agree with this.. Not saying its wrong but if the rest of the house has 1x4 casing and the windows have a wider casing it would look off to me. Good advice on the header at least being bigger than the casing. Only other thing I would do different would be hang the parting bead past the header/casing 3/4" on each side( like I said not wrong just personal preferace). Im doing a job now with the exact same detail... I'll get a pic when I can get back to work. Stuck in this ice storm in the Pacific Northwest.
I think it just has to be in close proportion to the top and side casing. The stool also needs to be proportioned correctly so it all blends in. I think you're right about the parting bead and would also add that the head casing could also extend 1/2" beyond the side. It all depends on the customer
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Old 01-20-2012, 03:10 PM   #12
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


The parting bead on my trim overhangs by 1/2" at the most, but that is it's depth in front of the head casing to it makes sense. I for one would NOT extend the head casing farther out than the side. In my house they both line up and I think it would look really strange if they did not. I suppose it is a matter of preference and the design of the rest of the trim in the house.
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:57 PM   #13
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large windows, Help w/ craftmans style moulding


1st thanks to all for the info. It's coming along.

Question: what do you make the top of the header with. Bed or crown moulding and what size. My 1x's are 4 inch wide ripped from a 1x6. Sizes go 3/4 inch Bead board,4 inch high 1x...total 4 3/4 high ...( now I'm stuck on the topper)

Thanks again

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