Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-12-2009, 11:42 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 101
Share |
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


Anyone know how to cut this?
Cmon you pro's, advanced DIYers you know how to do this and have never failed me yet.
Tell me the scoop.

just want to put laminate on with glue then trime the edge. the edge is finished oak bullnose.

Thanks guys/gals.
luweee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 11:48 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,802
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


Run a laminate trimmer along the edge and then glue/screw the edging? Or, put the laminate over the edging and run a bevel router bit over the edge? What kind of look are you going for?
jerryh3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 02:33 PM   #3
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


The laminate must be installed with contact cement. Follow the application directions on that and get a bunch of 1/2" wood dowel rods to make the process of laying it down easier. Then use a j-roller to roll it down and make the adhesive layers really grab to each other.

As stated, a laminate trimmer is a must. Use it once the laminate is glued down. That's basically a small router. A regular router will work as well, it just won't fit in small spaces and close to walls. A flush trim bit is used prior to application of the bullnose. If the bullnose is already there it'll be tough to make it look good because the bit's bearing has to ride the edge of something and I don't see that working with some bullnose profiles and cutter/bearing configurations.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 09:54 PM   #4
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
The laminate must be installed with contact cement. Follow the application directions on that and get a bunch of 1/2" wood dowel rods to make the process of laying it down easier. Then use a j-roller to roll it down and make the adhesive layers really grab to each other.

As stated, a laminate trimmer is a must. Use it once the laminate is glued down. That's basically a small router. A regular router will work as well, it just won't fit in small spaces and close to walls. A flush trim bit is used prior to application of the bullnose. If the bullnose is already there it'll be tough to make it look good because the bit's bearing has to ride the edge of something and I don't see that working with some bullnose profiles and cutter/bearing configurations.
Or........... go the "no-cost" route, and use something you probably already have on hand... a long, round extension cord. Simply loop the cord back and forth, and back and forth, about every 6", (from side to side), so that the cord fully supports the laminate above the countertop like a forty foot long, windy snake. Then, after aligning the laminate just right, push down on one end, firmly affixing it to the end of the countertop. Then begin pulling on the cord to progressively slip it out from under the laminate, letting the laminate contact the countertop about 6 more inches at a time as the cord is finally pulled out. (You do this starting at one end, and progressively working to the other.) When all the cord is pulled out, the laminate will have been steadily and perfectly lowered into contact with the countertop.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 08-12-2009 at 10:10 PM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 07:52 AM   #5
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
Or........... go the "no-cost" route, and use something you probably already have on hand... a long, round extension cord. Simply loop the cord back and forth, and back and forth, about every 6", (from side to side), so that the cord fully supports the laminate above the countertop like a forty foot long, windy snake. Then, after aligning the laminate just right, push down on one end, firmly affixing it to the end of the countertop. Then begin pulling on the cord to progressively slip it out from under the laminate, letting the laminate contact the countertop about 6 more inches at a time as the cord is finally pulled out. (You do this starting at one end, and progressively working to the other.) When all the cord is pulled out, the laminate will have been steadily and perfectly lowered into contact with the countertop.
That's a pretty good idea!
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2009, 07:08 AM   #6
gravity always wins
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,695
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


Is the bullnose already attached? If it is, does it have a ridge for the laminate to sit behind? If not, then I would build the top and apply the laminate. Flush trim it on the edge with a router or laminate trimmer, then attach the bull nose with biscuits. Either get a biscuit joiner or a router bit to cut the slots.
Maintenance 6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2009, 08:17 AM   #7
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


By the way, when working a long piece of laminate, make sure to adhere the center portion of the long strip first, rubbing outward toward the edges. Never let both edges make contact before the center. This could cause a bow or buckle in the center that you can't work out because the two sides are already firmly stuck down.

Remember laying laminate down is a slow, progressive process. Make sure where you are is smoothed out right before you move on down the line.

Trick: If you make an alignment mistake, all is not lost. Contact cement readily and quickly loosens by dribbling some Lacquer Thinner into the joint (curve) and peeling the laminate back. Small paint brushes and putty knives often make getting the Lacquer Thinner into the joint a bit easier. If you can stand the work vertically, all you need to do is dribble the LT back and forth along the curve... gravity does the rest as you peel.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 08-14-2009 at 08:28 AM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2009, 08:39 AM   #8
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Default

Laminte on countertop with wood bullnose


Some people do not realize this, but laminate "grows" for a day or so. What this means is that as the glue chemically cures and saturates the laminate backing, the material relaxes. This causes a problem how?

Well if you insist on trimming immediately after rolling out the laminate (which you should [MUST] do... "roll", I mean) the laminate will seem to have "grown" a little the next day, requiring more finish edge filing. Just let it sit till tomorrow before you trim it. You will find that those aggravating loose corners that you sometimes encounter will stay attached better if you wait a day on the trimming, too.

We're mainly DIY'er, so we can afford this small delay.

CAUTION: Everyone already knows to use Vaseline or some kind of lubricating oil on the previously laminated edges where the trimmer bit will ride for cutting the adjoining piece, right? You can burn that nice laminate finish with a high speed bit nose. The Vaseline keeps that from happening. Forget to use it, and I guarantee you WILL burn a spot sometime.

ALSO.......... Keep the dried glue cleaned off your bits by wiping them every few passes with a LT soaked rag. It makes for a cleaner cut. Be smart.... unplug the trimmer when you do this !!!!
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 08-14-2009 at 08:53 AM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OSB Stronger than Plywood? Weathermaker01 Flooring 15 12-22-2012 09:06 AM
Ready to paint the porch! Oil or latex? Leah Frances Painting 8 07-26-2011 07:29 PM
Ext Paint for Interior Application? PaoloM Painting 24 04-21-2009 04:30 AM
Do I need to replace a rotten sill plate met Carpentry 8 07-11-2008 09:14 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.