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bengreco 10-10-2011 05:39 PM

joining two beams on a post
 
In building my patio cover with three posts and two beams, how do I join two 4" x 10" beams at the center post? Also, the two beams will be meeting at an obtuse angle (about 140 degrees).

woodworkbykirk 10-10-2011 06:00 PM

i would do it as a 3 ply 2x10 beam instead of 4x10. this way you can offset each joint so you can through nail while alternating how each ply lays.. it will make is stronger. also you can get skewed connectors. a simpson strong tie LA-90 should do it.. its almost the same as a L-90 except you can set angle it to whatever angle you need. this is use in conjunction with regular fastening

if you still are going to use 4x10 use lag bolts

kwikfishron 10-10-2011 06:02 PM

I’d have a post to beam cap fabricated and send it to the galvanizer.

wombosi 10-10-2011 06:35 PM

maybe a half lap joint with diagonal braces. how big are the posts?

kwikfishron 10-10-2011 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wooworkbykirk (Post 746011)
i would do it as a 3 ply 2x10 beam instead of 4x10. this way you can offset each joint so you can through nail while alternating how each ply lays.. it will make is stronger. also you can get skewed connectors. a simpson strong tie LA-90 should do it.. its almost the same as a L-90 except you can set angle it to whatever angle you need. this is use in conjunction with regular fastening

if you still are going to use 4x10 use lag bolts

Thatís all fine but how are you connecting the beam to the post?

Daniel Holzman 10-10-2011 06:51 PM

Without a diagram, it is difficult to visualize exactly what you are doing. However, it is unusual in residential framing to connect two beams over a post, generally each beam rests on the post via a notch, and the beams are not connected, i.e. they are independently supported. By independently supporting the beams, you have a simple beam connection. If you actually connect the beams together over the post, you have an indeterminate connection, which leads to complex loads on the beams.

Beams that are simply connected have zero bending moment at the post, while beams that are continuous over the post experience negative moment over the post, which is not usually accounted for in standard design tables. I suggest you consider the previous suggestion of using a Simpson type connector, which will allow each beam to be independently supported. Of course, I am assuming you got the beams designed, hopefully you are not guessing at the required size of the beams. There are unlikely to be any standard tables for your design, so this leads to wonder, if you got the beams designed, why did the designer leave out the crucial detail of how to support them?


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