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Old 01-23-2014, 07:50 PM   #1
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Hi all - I'm putting up non-load bearing walls in my garage as part of a remodel project. I'm pretty sure the state building codes indicate it's OK to space the studs 24". Does that sound right? is it OK to use 2x4 studs? One wall will have electrical and plumbing running through the studs-1" and 3/4" pipe for the water. Thanks

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Old 01-23-2014, 09:53 PM   #2
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typically 24" o.c. is fine for a single story non-load bearing wall

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Old 01-24-2014, 10:57 AM   #3
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The garage is below living space. I'll be attaching the top plate to the floor joist above. Still OK 24" spacing with 2x4 studs? Thanks
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:46 PM   #4
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as mentioned if its non bearing 24" o.c is fine, if the floor above has some bounce to it you can shift the spacing down to 16" o.c and cut the studs snug to help take some bounce out
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:18 PM   #5
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Thanks for the help. I'll go 24" and save a few bucks.
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:45 PM   #6
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A 20' wall will only contain 5 more studs going 16" oc. This will make for a stiffer wall and be worth the $15 that you were gonna save.
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Old 01-25-2014, 09:01 PM   #7
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At 24", if you use 1/2" drywall....they are going to be bouncy.....and wavy.

For the sake of saving 15$, not worth the shortcut.
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Old 01-26-2014, 07:18 PM   #8
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Good points about the bouncy and wavy potential. I'm having a hard time getting motivated for this project so...a few less studs to nail and drill holes in Don't want to start the project cutting corners - 16" it is.
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Old 01-27-2014, 08:49 AM   #9
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Good points about the bouncy and wavy potential. I'm having a hard time getting motivated for this project so...a few less studs to nail and drill holes in Don't want to start the project cutting corners - 16" it is.

pull a 15 1/4" measurement from one direction/corner and then pull 16" layout from the 15 1/4" and then start your drywall from that direction, this breaks drywall at the center of studs. if you have a shower or tub rough in change your layout and frame between the studs 12" at center of shower/tub where valves go and be sure and add plenty of wood at the corners of walls, ceilings where the drywall edges stop so they have something to nail to.
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Old 01-28-2014, 10:12 PM   #10
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Yep, 16" stud centers will give you a nicer wall than 24" and I agree, it's worth it.

However, 24" centers are permitted for exterior studs supporting roof load, but not including a second floor.
As long as the rafters, trusses or joist line up with the studs and you have 2 top plates, you should have 2 top plates anyways.
Typically these 24" on center studs are 2x6.

I've framed lots of homes for builders using 24" centers for exterior walls and they are a little better insulated but structurally not as good as 16" centers.

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Old 01-30-2014, 06:59 PM   #11
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You can do the 24 OC and use ceiling board, low sag drywall to help it from being springy but it will be a few more bucks a sheet and you may have to go to a drywall supplier to get it.
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Old 01-30-2014, 07:20 PM   #12
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Yes.......or go standard 5/8" gyproc which is even stronger and will give you a better fire rating and I think it's about the same price as cd or ceiling board........which is specially designed for ceilings.
5/8" is heavier but for walls doesn't matter that much.
But keep in mind to make sure stuff like plug in boxes and window returns accommodate the extra thickness.

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Old 01-30-2014, 08:38 PM   #13
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Thanks for all the good info. I have a related question - is it OK to add an additional 12-16" of wall to an existing length of wall (non-load bearing)? Would I have to tie it in to the longer length with some type of plate? The project has to be completed in a certain sequence (plumbing/electrical), it would make things a lot easier if I could add the additional section later. I apologize if it's poor forum etiquette to add this additional question to the thread.
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Old 01-31-2014, 12:48 AM   #14
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Yes, you should cut the top plate back on the existing wall by 3' or so and tie the new short wall in with an extra top plate.

Last edited by Gary Evans; 01-31-2014 at 12:51 AM.
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Old 01-31-2014, 07:13 AM   #15
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you could do as Gary mentioned or if there is wood in the ceiling ( you can go into attic and add a nailer block) just add new top plate to ceiling screwing/nailing it really good. do the same at the floor, add bottom plate nailing/screwing it good to floor and then add a double stud for the end of the wall. double stud makes for a strong outside corner...

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