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Old 09-07-2009, 12:27 PM   #1
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Installing new interior doors


Hi,

I have 9 new solid core doors to install. They aren't prehung so I'm going to have to make new jams for them. I've never done this. Does anyone know of a good tutorial out there?

Also I don't own a nailer suitable for this application. All I have a finish nailer. What size should I be looking at? Is a framing nailer overkill for this? I'm not sure what gauge of nails I should be thinking about. My compressor also probably wouldn't power one since it only develops 80PSI. I should probably try and find a good powered or cordless one so I don't have buy a new compressor. Is there a particular brand I should look at? I see Paslode pretty frequently for sale on Craigs.

Thanks for the help!!

Eric

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Old 09-07-2009, 02:26 PM   #2
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Installing new interior doors


Eric,
Here is a short UK video that makes it look easy (NOT).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFRarItTzyk

The Door Hanging master is Gary Katz
http://www.amazon.com/Installing-Han.../dp/1561586358

Most folks use the existing Jambs so a nailer is not necessary. That crazy video says all it takes for power tools is a circular saw and a belt sander.

I would add a router and Templaco hinge template and Templaco Mortise bit:
http://www.templaco.com/html/product.asp?id=186

For 3-1/2" Hinge: (other sizes are available)
http://www.templaco.com/html/product...=Single_Pocket

And for the Strikes and Latches:
http://www.toolbarn.com/portercable-59375.html

A door lock installation Kit:
http://www.amazon.com/Kwikset-130WD-.../dp/B0002YUQ62

Screw Clamp to use as a 'Door Buck' (to hold door vertical for planing)
http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-...px?ac=ts&ra=fp

My best tip would be to order Gary Katz's book from Amazon. I went to his two day seminar in 2002 and he does know his doors.
.


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Last edited by PaliBob; 09-07-2009 at 07:08 PM. Reason: Fixed 'Door Buck' Link
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Old 09-07-2009, 02:36 PM   #3
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Installing new interior doors


For 9 doors, you really don't even need a nailer. Twelve 10d finish nails per frame. This isn't like installing shingles where you shoot them in one after the other. You need to set the shims, drive in a few nails, make some adjustments and finish the nailing.
If you want a finish nailer, get one that shoots 15 guage nails and a compressor. There are packages out there that will pair them up. If you have future ideas about other tools, get a compressor that will handle your future needs instead of just the current one.
For a tutorial, check out You Tube for a broad overview. There are probably some DIY videos on the Web about it.
Also check out the ,"How To" section on this forum. Mayby someone has taken the time to put one on here.
Ron
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Old 09-07-2009, 03:07 PM   #4
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Installing new interior doors


Hey Bob,

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaliBob View Post

Here is a short UK video that makes it look easy (NOT).


Ha, ha, cool 5 minutes per door. I just have to work as fast as a Benny Hill sketch. Maybe if I have Yakety Sax playing in the background I'll work faster


Quote:
Most folks use the existing Jambs so a nailer is not necessary. That crazy video says all it takes for power tools is a circular saw and a belt sander.


Unfortunately I've already pretty much committed to re-jamming them. They're pretty messy looking and covered in many layers of paint. I tried stripping one with a heat gun and spent hours, and then took more time to try to putty up. I think I'll get a much better result with new jams. I know it's going to be a hassle but that's what you get when you buy and old abused home

Quote:
And for the Strikes and Latches:
http://www.toolbarn.com/portercable-59375.html
Yay, more tools I'll only use once Fortunately I already have a router.
Can that same Templaco Mortise bit be used with this latch template?

Quote:
A door lock installation Kit:
Ooh nasty, I'd hoped there would be some kind of jig to assist with getting that backset hole drilled. Looks like it would be pretty scary to get it in perfectly square with just a hand held spade bit.

Quote:
Screw Clamp to use as a 'Door Buck' (to hold door vertical for planing)
http://www.amazon.com/Kwikset-130WD-.../dp/B0002YUQ62
I'm afraid this is the same link as the lock install kit Am I going to have to buy a planer also?

Quote:
My best tip would be to order Gary Katz's book from Amazon. I went to his two day seminar in 2002 and he does know his doors.
It looks like my library has a copy of
The doorhanger's handbook / Gary Katz. Are you familiar with this one?

Thanks for the links!

Eric
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Old 09-07-2009, 07:06 PM   #5
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Installing new interior doors


Quote:
Originally Posted by everyman View Post
Yay, more tools I'll only use once
Can that same Templaco Mortise bit be used with this latch template?
Yes, You could use a PC guide bushing and a straight mortise bit, but this way there is one less thing to keep track of.

Quote:
I'm afraid this is the same link as the lock install kit Am I going to have to buy a planer also?
Thanks, I fixed the Link. The clamp just takes the place of a door buck, but with 9 doors, you may want to get a cheap Door Buck from the lumberyard.

A planer is not required but I think it is easier, like for that 3° bevel
on the lock stile.
It can be a hand planer.

You will have to cut down the doors, even with new jambs, that is unless you want to do extensive re-framing of the rough openings. Cutting down doors is a lot easier with a track saw like the Festool w/guiderail. Gary didn't have one when he wrote the Door book. Now it is his must have tool. Glad to see you have his book.
.
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Last edited by PaliBob; 09-07-2009 at 07:11 PM.
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Old 09-07-2009, 07:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaliBob View Post

The clamp just takes the place of a door buck, but with 9 doors, you may want to get a cheap Door Buck from the lumberyard.


Ah okay now I understand the purpose. I can probably rig something up with a sheet of ply for a base and 2x4s.

Quote:
You will have to cut down the doors, even with new jambs, that is unless you want to do extensive re-framing of the rough openings. Cutting down doors is a lot easier with a track saw like the Festool w/guiderail.
.


Erk, don't think I can commit to a $500 for a weekend job. I have a halfway decent table saw. It doesn't have a huge bed, but if I get a helper is there any reason I can't just use that? I'd think that would be an easy enough way to bevel the lock styles as well.
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Old 09-07-2009, 08:49 PM   #7
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Installing new interior doors


Why not get prehung doors?

If prehung not available, there are shops that will make them prehung for you for a reasonable price - compared to the time and effort of creating your own if inexperienced.
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Old 09-08-2009, 11:42 AM   #8
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Installing new interior doors


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Originally Posted by vsheetz View Post
Why not get prehung doors?

If prehung not available, there are shops that will make them prehung for you for a reasonable price - compared to the time and effort of creating your own if inexperienced.
Unfortunately the solid core doors that Lowes and HD sell are not prehung and can't be ordered that way, sad state of affairs that this is... I looked into ordering them that way from an online source and the cost was quite a bit higher than the panel and jam kit from HD, together, sub $100.

I am looking for a contractor to come over and assist me with this as the 30"ers are pretty heavy, especially the French one.
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Old 09-08-2009, 11:46 AM   #9
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Installing new interior doors


Does anyone have any experience with those Quick Hanger brackets? They seem like they would make the job a bit easier to do solo, as well as make the jam a bit more sturdy.

One the downside it seems like they might make it difficult to work with an out of plumb wall. Also I'm wondering whether the extra thickness they add would make molding installation harder.
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Old 09-08-2009, 11:58 PM   #10
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Installing new interior doors


Hey Bob,

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaliBob View Post

A planer is not required but I think it is easier, like for that 3° bevel
on the lock stile.
It can be a hand planer.

.
Is this the sort of planer you are referring to?

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91062

Any tips for how one would get the proper chamfer using a tool like that? do you just draw a line a few millimeters in from one edge and try to plane it down to that level while at the same time not taking it off of the other edge? It seems a bit hit or miss. I've tried doing similar things with a belt sander and the line seems to always come out a bit wavy.

If I push it super slow through a table saw with a sharp blade might that work and not chip out too badly?

Thanks
Eric
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Old 09-09-2009, 06:24 AM   #11
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Installing new interior doors



Quote:
Does anyone have any experience with those Quick Hanger brackets?
Never heard of them. Can you post a link?

Quote:
Originally Posted by everyman View Post
Hey Bob, Is this the sort of planer you are referring to?
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91062[
I was referring to a Hand Plane, not electric, but that HF Plane would be a lot faster. I wouldn't be afraid to buy one.
Quote:
Any tips for how one would get the proper chamfer using a tool like that? do you just draw a line a few millimeters in from one edge and try to plane it down to that level while at the same time not taking it off of the other edge? It seems a bit hit or miss. I've tried doing similar things with a belt sander and the line seems to always come out a bit wavy.
With a plane the edge won't be as wavy.

Quote:
If I push it super slow through a table saw with a sharp blade might that work and not chip out too badly?
I would not attempt to cut a door that way, especially a solid core door. If I did not have my Festool TS 55 I would use a circular saw set to a 3° bevel while using a straight edge as a guide


Eric, My Templaco single hinge template, suggestion was for a template to be used to match to hinge positions to the original jambs, but since you are going to install new jambs it will be much easier to use a full length template. The templates come in different configurations for Hinge size, number of hinges, hinge radius, and height of the door. Here is the is size for the most common style 3-1/2”, three hinge template for 6 8”doors.

.
http://www.templaco.com/html/template_base.asp?id=118

Available at most lumber yards.

This full length template will save you a ton of time because you use the template for both the door and the jambs.

Tip: When you buy the hinges, get the hinges that have ¼” corners (not square corners). That way you don’t have to square up the hinge mortise, same for the latch & strike (get them with the rounded corners).

I assume you are in the US, True?
.


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Old 05-02-2010, 04:30 PM   #12
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Installing new interior doors


Hi,

After a long hiatus for other work, I'm getting back to replacing my interior jams/doors with jam kits and solid pine doors. I'm using the first edition of the Katz door book as my reference, and have encountered my first question.

In the case of a 24" wide interior door. How wide should the jam be? The interior jam section of the book launches into assembly of the jam without regard for what the dimension of the jam should be. What should be the dimension between the jam legs in relation to the door?

In the exterior door section, he does make this statement, "For a single door the inside dimension of a jam should be exactly the size of the door". I'm not sure why this would be specific to an exterior door per say but with all due respect to Mr Katz, is this really the case? How would this work without at a minimum marring the finish on the door or jam? I've always been under the impression that the jam was a fraction wider then the door to allow smooth operation, especially in cases where things might shift a bit over time. Our slabs here in Austin are not known for staying exactly the same all year round.

The existing doors in my house all have about an 1/8 gap between the lockset edge of the door and the jam leg when viewed from the inside of the door.

Were I to do as he suggests and make it exactly the same width as the door is the 3 degree bevel on the lockset side of the door enough to allow for smooth operation? Alternatively if I was to allow some extra width in the jam, could I avoid having to chamfer every door edge? Given that these are interior doors it's not like I'm trying to make them air tight.

Thanks!
Eric
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Old 05-02-2010, 04:50 PM   #13
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Installing new interior doors


The width of the wall determines the size of the jamb, not the size of the door. If you're speaking about the length of the jamb parts, it will vary relative to how you construct the door frame.
I'm not sure of your terminology.
Ron
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:23 PM   #14
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Installing new interior doors


I hate doing doors and am not good at it - I just get frustrated... But I have a guy who for a reasonable price is really great at doors, trim, etc.. I keep him on my speed dial list.
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:33 PM   #15
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Installing new interior doors


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
The width of the wall determines the size of the jamb, not the size of the door. If you're speaking about the length of the jamb parts, it will vary relative to how you construct the door frame.
I'm not sure of your terminology.
Ron

Ron,

I'm trying to establish how far apart the jam legs should be from each other, not how wide each leg member should be. The jam kit comes standard with a 3' long head so that the kit can be used for different sized doors. I'm trying to figure out how long to cut that piece, and that's going to be determined by how wide the interior dimension of the fitted jam needs to be.

The door is exactly 24" wide so how wide should the interior of the jam legs be? If Katz is to be believed on this, it should be exactly 24" wide, and this just doesn't make sense to me. Certainly none of my existing doors are like that but I don't know if that was just due to crappy carpentry.

I've found a few yahoo how-to's that say to allow 1/4" extra width for gaps but that seems a bit excessive. I'm not sure if there is a standard rule of thumb for this.

Eric


Last edited by everyman; 05-02-2010 at 05:35 PM.
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