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Old 11-06-2010, 02:34 PM   #1
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Installing an Entry Door


I am currently in the process of having my Entry Door replaced. I have a 32" inch door with 12" side lights on each side, totaling 61 1/2" wide. My current opening for an entry door is 60 1/2" wide rough opening.

I have had most people tell me that it will be ok to tempory remove the current jacks on each side and replaced with smaller width jacks to make up the inch difference for the new door to fit correctly.

My question is, will this be structurely sound?

Lastly, the door is a special order Jeld-Wen door that I have not recieved yet, so it may just fit fine but looking at my options since the door has already been ordered.

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Old 11-06-2010, 03:46 PM   #2
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Installing an Entry Door


Why would you go to the expense of ordering a door for an opening that it can't fit?
Modifying the opening can be done, but without additional pertinient information, arbitrary solutions are a waste of time.
What skill set does the peanut gallery have when they advised you?
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Old 11-06-2010, 03:49 PM   #3
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Installing an Entry Door


An example of what Ron is referring to would be if the siding overlaps the studs you want to access not to mention drywall on inside then you are setting yourself up for a bunch of other "band aid" jobs as opposed to getting the measurements right.
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Old 11-06-2010, 03:57 PM   #4
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Installing an Entry Door


I ordered the door at Home Depot and had them come out and do the measurements. The installer told me that it could be done by removing the Jacks and installing smaller ones to make up for the inch that I needed.

So I ordered the door and the standard quote for a door with sidelights went from $500 to a quote of $825 to install and do the work. Since the door is on special order, I figured I would get some additional quotes to make sure that I was not getting taken advantage. I just wanted to make sure that its ok to do that.

Make sense?
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Old 11-06-2010, 04:49 PM   #5
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Installing an Entry Door


No. It doesn't make sense.

The cripple/jack stud is sized for a reason. To carry the load acting on it. By replacing it with a smaller cripple/jack stud, the replacement piece may not be properly sized to carry the load from the header.

If the supplier attempted to do this on my home, I would not allow it. But it isn't my house...
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Old 11-06-2010, 05:49 PM   #6
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Installing an Entry Door


Quote:
Originally Posted by heathmac View Post
I ordered the door at Home Depot and had them come out and do the measurements.
That was your first mistake.



Quote:
The installer told me that it could be done by removing the Jacks and installing smaller ones to make up for the inch that I needed.
Second mistake trusting an idiot because he was obviously wrong.

Quote:
So I ordered the door and the standard quote for a door with sidelights went from $500 to a quote of $825 to install and do the work. Since the door is on special order, I figured I would get some additional quotes to make sure that I was not getting taken advantage. I just wanted to make sure that its ok to do that.

Make sense?
No, it doesn't make sense because you can't make the jacks smaller structurally, they are there for a reason. They are not professionals who told you this. Call a legit contractor recommended from a real lumberyard now to see what you can do.
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Old 11-06-2010, 06:40 PM   #7
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Installing an Entry Door


A new user comes here with a simple question and gets b**** slapped. Unbelievable, this isn’t CT boys.
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Last edited by kwikfishron; 11-07-2010 at 05:04 AM.
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:18 PM   #8
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Installing an Entry Door


Quote:
Originally Posted by heathmac View Post
So I ordered the door and the standard quote for a door with sidelights went from $500 to a quote of $825 to install and do the work.
I think the up-charge is in line as long as this is how the new door installation is detailed.

Here are the steps
Remove interior trim
Remove door
Remove exterior toe kick
Remove existing 1-1/2" jacks
Install new "smaller" jacks
Pan flash the sill with Vycor or equivalent
Since the rough opening is larger, you would assume the finished exterior will be larger...so.......
Cut back the siding
Install the new door
Install drip cap on top of door (usually involves removing a piece of siding)
Install new door kick because ...the new door is NOT the same width as the old door so the old toe kick will be shorter than the new door
Caulk trim to door casing
Foam insulate around door interior
Provide and install new interior trim ...again...the new door is NOT the same size as the old door so the old trim will NOT fit the new door
Cut back baseboard to fit new trim width
Install new hardware
Cleanup and dispose of old door and debris

Make sense?

....and by the way...that whole idea of making the jacks smaller would make me a bit nervous. The term "smaller" is pretty vague.
If he does this, I would insist that it be no smaller than 5/4 (1") spruce.
Not pine, not plywood, not composite.....but spruce or hemlock

Good luck

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Old 11-06-2010, 09:53 PM   #9
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Installing an Entry Door


Without more info the details of a professional install would be difficult to list to say the least.

That is not to say a true professional would find himself over his head with your entry door install. This is not an insurmountable task. Its just that there are too many variables not known to give you all the proper steps needed for a safe install.

I will say this, if you end up replacing a 2x with a 1x it wouldn't hurt to install some hardware to tie the king, header and 1x together.
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Old 11-06-2010, 10:09 PM   #10
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Installing an Entry Door


If the door opening is plumb, it may fit, since sometimes they allow an inch or so for adjusting. You would also have the option of ripping down a couple of 5/4 deck boards which are an actual 1" thick and using a couple of very strong metal L-brackets in each of the upper corners where the header meets the 5/4 (1") revised jack stud. Personally I would try and call them, talk to a manager, and find out for sure the size and if you can stop the order,and have them make one to fit.
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Old 11-06-2010, 10:43 PM   #11
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Installing an Entry Door


You know what, I have re-thought this, even using the true 1" boards, you would be taking a chance and since you said this is an entry door, I assume this is load-bearing and I have no idea the weight above it . HD should never have told you this could be done and this is their baby. Please for your own peace of mind, talk to a manager in the morning and have them make the proper size for you. This is their goof-up and I can assure you HD has had to eat much worse then this. That's why they charge us the big bucks. I have a feeling if they install this they will try and get away with 1x"s which are actually only 3/4 an inch thick which is 1/2 the size of your 1/1/2" jack stud. They gave you the wrong info and they will just have to eat it.
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Old 11-06-2010, 11:00 PM   #12
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Installing an Entry Door


Start by putting a 'hold' on your order. Then contact a Contractor, Professional Engineer or Architect to survey your problem. If they give the OK then proceed with the smaller jack studs.

Support the header during the replacement. You can rent a screw type jack or cut a 4X4 close to height and drive door shims above or below for temp. support.

Cut the new jacks about 1/32"-1/16" longer than your measure so that they are a drive fit. Wood will compress under load and shrink as it ages.
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Old 11-06-2010, 11:09 PM   #13
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Installing an Entry Door


How about a picture of the existing front door area ?
From back a bit showing the roof
The area above my front door is not load bearing
But not all houses are like that
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Old 11-06-2010, 11:35 PM   #14
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Installing an Entry Door


They will just give him one to fit and discount the other one on clearance. I bought a big double-top of the line aluminum clad, stainable interior, pella window like that once still in the plastic wrap for $169, was probably a $1000.00 window.
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Old 11-10-2010, 08:06 PM   #15
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Installing an Entry Door


Quote:
Originally Posted by alyna View Post
There's really a big mistake here.
How is this a helpful post? All I hear is inane dribble.
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