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Old 12-17-2008, 11:58 AM   #1
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Installing door casing


I have read numerous articles on how to install casing, but what gets me is the joints. Everything says to use scrap to figure your angles, but my miter saw only goes to 45 degrees in either direction which means nothing like 45 to 47 angles are possible. Any tips? Or will it look acceptable to get it close enough (I mean, you can't fit a piece of paper in the gap, it is very close, just not seamless) and caulk the gap and paint?

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Old 12-17-2008, 12:51 PM   #2
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Installing door casing


If you're painting it, just latex caulk it and be done. Nobody will ever know the difference once it's painted.

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Old 12-17-2008, 02:13 PM   #3
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Installing door casing


Sorry, but even a caulked painted miter joint will show up. It'll appear as a depression in the caulk. Some people can live with that but it would drive me nuts.

Are you 100% sure that your miter saw isn't adjustable? It is very unusual for a power miter saw to not have the ability to adjust to odd degrees between the normal 45*, 22-1/2* (etc) stops.

A block plane can be used to adjust miters a little bit as necessary.

Another trick that will let you fake it a little bit is to hang the side casings first, then cut the head casing to fit. Don't nail the top two or three feet of the sides until the head casing is in and the flex in the side casing will allow for a very small amount of wiggle room.
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:16 PM   #4
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Installing door casing


When I hang casing, I install the top piece first with only one nail in the center of the casing. Then, I fit one side getting the joints to match up then nail a couple of nails on each piece near that joint. Then I do the other side using the same process. After the joints are nailed tight, I secure the rest of the casing keeping the reveal consistent. There's usually enough flex in the casing that you can pull non 45 degree angles tight.
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:53 PM   #5
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Installing door casing


I certainly can adjust anywhere between 0 and 45. I was just saying I can't go past 45 degrees which makes it hard to do say 47 degrees. Hrm, sounds like I need to experiment a tad. I would cut it on the table saw, but the miters on there are never great.
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Old 12-17-2008, 05:23 PM   #6
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Installing door casing


cut all your casings at 45, cut the heads @ 45, Nail the casings first, dont nail the last foot yet, put heads on, block plane if needed or just tap them down to tighten the joint. GLUE every joint. Nail outside then inside
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Old 12-17-2008, 08:53 PM   #7
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Installing door casing


As long as your door jamb is flush with the sheet rock, a 45 should be the correct angle. Assuming your door jamb is plumb too. Not since I first started trimming houses have I needed to cut the casing at something different than a 45.
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Old 12-18-2008, 09:30 AM   #8
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Installing door casing


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Sorry, but even a caulked painted miter joint will show up. It'll appear as a depression in the caulk. Some people can live with that but it would drive me nuts.
A bigger gap, I agree, but he's talking about a gap that he can't fit a piece of paper into, barely a gap at all. Do a good job caulking, and after a couple coats of paint, you won't see it.

I do agree with the other suggestions about leaving wiggle room, and pulling them together. That is a step I've always done, too. I've always installed the sides first, then the top piece to fit.
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Old 12-18-2008, 12:24 PM   #9
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Installing door casing


one trick with the miter saw if you really need a 47* angle you can use a shim of a certain thickness behind your trim piece to get your 47* on miter saw. Pieces of wood between your saw fence and your trim at the furthest away from the saw blade will "kick" the trim out just enough to give you the angle you need. Just have to be really careful when doing this because if the piece slips it could pinch your finger between the fance and trim.

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