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-   -   How many Tooth Saw Blade for Trim? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/how-many-tooth-saw-blade-trim-127672/)

HandyFrank 12-25-2011 11:18 PM

How many Tooth Saw Blade for Trim?
 
My Dewalt 10" compound miter saw can use a new blade and I'm planning on doing some trim work later this week. Trying to decide which blade to get.

I love the Freud Diablo blades so i'll either go with one of those, or, plain Dewalt Blades.

I've always used whatever came with the saw and I think I have a 40 tooth Dewalt blade on their now.

I found either a 2 pack of Dewalt blades with a 32 tooth, and 60 tooth combo, or, they have the 40 tooth General purpose Freud blade for the same price. So i'll basically get 2 Dewalt blades, or 1 Freud. Price on either of these is about $30

Amazon has the 50 tooth Freud combination blade for $37. or a 60 tooth Freud Fine Finish blade for $39.

I do just about everything from Trim to 2X4 frame cutting. Would the 50 tooth be the best bet for a good blade to do both? I'd rather not have to switch the blades back and forth, but would if I have too.

All the trim I'm doing is going to be painted. I'm a weekend warrior so this will do a lot of projects from simple to complex ones.

From my experience the Dewalt blades get the job done, and the Freud's are awesome. So its basically the Dewalt 32 and 60 tooth for $30, or, 1 of the Freud's anywhere from $30 to about $40.

What tooth count should I go for?

Snav 12-26-2011 12:38 AM

Go Freud or go home :)

Freud makes a very nice thin kerf crosscut blade which I suggest you use - find it online . . . when it comes to blades I wouldn't piddle over cost as a determining factor - it's quality that counts. Quality of cut, minimal of waste, an ideal gullet depth and a nice well thought out hook angle.

I'd go with a blade that has 60 - 80Tpi depending on the material you're cutting.

A combination blade lets you rip and crosscut - when working with higher Tpi rip cutting can be an issue that this helps to overcome.

joecaption 12-26-2011 12:41 AM

I agree but when you go to cut more 2 X's swithch the blade back or the blade will over heat and cut to slow.

HandyFrank 12-26-2011 12:49 AM

Thanks so far. I'll mainly either be cutting indoor pre-primed trim and baseboard stock, or 2X4's for all sorts of stuff. I've mostly just used the 40 tooth blade on there for all sorts of trim and have been happy when it was on the sharper side.

Sort of trying to eliminate the need to swap blades but I'll do it if I have too.

The Dewalt deal for the 32 and 60 tooth was tempting at cheaper than the 1 diablo, but I can agree I should just stick with what I like, and know is best.

Take a look at this page:
Diablo Blades

Looks like one of these might do it?
D1040X/A - General Blade
D1050X - Combination Blade
D1060X - Fine Finish

Would the 50 tooth be maybe the best so I could get clean acceptable trim cuts, but still rip down the 2X4 as I need? Seems like the 60 tooth might be burning itself out on the rough 2X4 cuts and wasting the blades?



Snav 12-26-2011 12:54 AM

To eliminate the need to swap blades be more careful with your project planning - focus on doing as much 2x4 work as possible . . . then trim work. They're two different beasts. You should be able to do it with minimal blade switches.

I use a variety of blades an swap as often as necessary. Don't hesitate to switch. It takes a short amount of time and the blades last longer - it's not that big of a deal.

For Diablo - if you don't want to have different blades you have to go with their combination. It is designed to handle rip cutting and crosscutting. The gullet is deep which enables a better rip cut, as well - which you're not getting with the others since those can't crosscut well at all.

HandyFrank 12-26-2011 01:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snav (Post 803294)
To eliminate the need to swap blades be more careful with your project planning - focus on doing as much 2x4 work as possible . . . then trim work. They're two different beasts. You should be able to do it with minimal blade switches.

I use a variety of blades an swap as often as necessary. Don't hesitate to switch. It takes a short amount of time and the blades last longer - it's not that big of a deal.

For Diablo - if you don't want to have different blades you have to go with their combination. It is designed to handle rip cutting and crosscutting. The gullet is deep which enables a better rip cut, as well - which you're not getting with the others since those can't crosscut well at all.

That's the truth, a few extra minutes can save the blade and get the job done better.

Is 60 tooth a good blade for trim and possible crown molding one day (Painted), or should I go higher for that stuff? Don't expect to be staining any of the trim.

Snav 12-26-2011 01:12 AM

If you're swapping - and going from your first post options - the Dewalts would be fine.

If you go with Diablo you'd pick according ot the same idea - one for lumber/rip (30-40 T) and the other for crosscutting (60T +).

If you go with the combination it's likely you can handle everything you need to do with the one blade.

Have you done crown molding before - how did it go, what did you use before?

I don't think blade matters when it comes to staining/painting - if you choose the right blade you'll have a crisp cut and no need to fill (painting doesn't hide chunks, fractures and slivers, either does staining - only filling and tlc can make them smooth out)

Daniel Holzman 12-26-2011 08:17 AM

I believe you said you have a compound miter saw. I have a sliding bevel compound miter saw, and I never use it to rip. I cannot quite visualize how you would use a non sliding compound miter saw to rip. I have a 60 TPI carbide tipped blade clearly designed for cross cutting, it has worked on my Makita extremely well for several years now, and that includes a lot of cutting (I built a deck with it). I have a Freud rip blade I use on my table saw, which is where I do all my ripping. Works great. I also have a couple of fine tooth blades I RARELY use for anything, once in a while I break them out for extra fine cutting of hardwood veneered plywood, or for the extremely rare cut where I need the absolute finest edge, but generally I get perfectly acceptable results with the cross cut blade on the miter saw and the rip blade on the table saw. When I make furniture, I have to sand the edges anyway, so the finest cut is not generally an issue.

zircon 12-26-2011 08:52 AM

For a compound miter saw you should choose a blade where the package specifically states that it is suitable for compound miter saw or radial arm saw. These blades have a negative hook angle. A blade with a positive hook angle will tend to "climb" the work and can be scary to use.
On my table saw I have the Freud Diablo ripping blade and I use it to crosscut also with good results.

BigJim 12-26-2011 09:41 AM

I have had a Dewalt blade that wabbled so I quit buying them. The Freud blades are pretty good for the bucks but if you want super smooth cutting go with the Forest WWII blades, you can hear the difference when cutting. CMT use to make a great blade also. I use to use an 80 tooth blade in my stair work, I wanted a cut like glass.

On the table saw I want a really good combo blade, it stays sharper way longer and makes great rips and even cross cutting is smooth.

47_47 12-27-2011 09:14 AM

Ditto on the Forrest Woodworker II.

woodworkbykirk 12-28-2011 07:11 PM

for paint grade trim i use a 40 tooth freud blade on my 12" bosch, they work great. for stain grade i switch to a 80 tooth freud.. if your cutting 2x lumber the stock blade is all you need or any lower tooth count blade will do

ive used the dewalt blades but find they deflect too easily since they are thin kerf blades. also their throw away blades, there isnt enough carbide on the teeth to bother with sharpening them once dull. the freuds are made to sharpen up to 6 times


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