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Old 07-22-2008, 09:42 PM   #1
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how far is too far?


Dealing with some wood rot on a 2nd floor rim joist and the wall plate it sits on. The siding was T-111 and wasn't flashed right. The wood has dried out and I've chiseled out the crumbly stuff down to what I think is good wood but I keep thinking I should just cut these bad spots out and splice in new. I'm down to wood I can't penetrate more than 1/8". Any opinions would be appreciated.

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Old 07-22-2008, 09:56 PM   #2
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how far is too far?


Its hard to tell for sure, but I don't think you have a structural issue with that rim joist. Although there was some fairly shallow rot, you're not dealing with a header that is in span between two distant bearing points. I'd be more concerned with removing small sections of rim. In order to effectively do it without creating structural problems, you'd have to add studs under both sides of the new sections of rim to support the splices. I'd also suggest strapping the new to the old rim if you go that route.

It appears that you've removed the entire piece(s) of siding. What I would suggest doing is sistering new studs alongside the ones that have rot at their end grain. If that end grain is weakened, the studs' ability to transfer the loads downward to the floor/rim is compromised. Adding another stud tight to the underside of the rim will take the damaged studs out of the structural equation. If there are wires in the wall that would require removal to facilitate a new stud's installation, I'd suggest turning the new stud 90* so it is flat in the wall, flush to the outside face of the wall. Nail through the old stud into the new one, and through the new stud into both plates.

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Old 07-22-2008, 10:16 PM   #3
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how far is too far?


The only thing I would do, is rip off the T1-11 and sheath the structure followed by installation of some real siding. (I hate the T1-11; have since we sided our newly-built house out of it in the 60's, and had to replace it all not long after.)
You have just surface rot. If you've removed the punky wood, you could use some Minwax wood hardener to stabilize it prior to sheathing over it, but that's not even necessary.
Adding additional studs could be done, but that would depend on the condition of the existing studs, which I can't tell from here. Better safe than sorry.
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Old 07-22-2008, 11:40 PM   #4
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how far is too far?


My instinct would be to reinforce that rotted section with a steel plate that would cover the rim joist and the upper plate!
The plate could be mounted using flat-head screws in counter-sunk holes.
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Old 07-23-2008, 10:57 AM   #5
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how far is too far?


I agree with the above statement that there is not much damaged. but I see the damage as cancer in a human. if you don't get rid of it it will keep growing. What I do see is a future dry rot problem. clean it good.
that's the problem with T1-11 most of the time there's no second barrier for water intrusion. they just apply it over the studs.
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Old 07-25-2008, 07:46 AM   #6
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Thanks for everyone's suggestions. The studs are in still in good shape so it's just the plate and rim joist at this point and I will proceed with the advice. I'll be back on though, I've got a whole lot of T1-11 to replace and who knows what I'll find beneath as I work around the house.

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