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Old 06-03-2013, 07:38 PM   #1
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how does one compare treated wood?


I have to buy some 16' treated 6x6's and I have been loyal to my local lumber yard. Recently Menards just came into STL and purchased some lumber there because of location.

I have 4 6x6's 8' from menards and still 1 unused 8' 6x6 from my lumber yard, Old Monroe by the way.

Old Monroe: wetter and darker, has more exterior knots. I used 3 already and they were about consistent with this as well. I did not get to pick these since they were delivered. $24

Menards: Dryer with less knots, still a heavy board though. All 4 of these look the same. when I picked them up they had to pull a new pallet since what was left was only the junkers picked over so I had good picking. $32

Both show signs of some center split down long ways of the board.

thanks, I know old monroe's lumber is Yellow Pine, I didn't ask menards yet.

Feel free to give your opinion on my Pergola idea post which this lumber will be used. pergola drawing questions/span/doubler's??


Last edited by csmonte; 06-03-2013 at 07:40 PM. Reason: adding text.
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Old 06-03-2013, 08:23 PM   #2
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how does one compare treated wood?


Read the lables that came stapled to the ends to see what you have.
6 X 6's almost always split (check) along there length.

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Old 06-28-2013, 04:33 PM   #3
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how does one compare treated wood?


anyone have any input on getting treated that seems dryer?
Does the wood crack as it drys?

it would seem if it were treated in a comparative way and one is dry and it cracks at it drys. that buying dryer wood would have less risk?

this is just theory, I have no idea.
I need to buy a few 6x6's and was trying to compare.
thanks
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:10 AM   #4
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how does one compare treated wood?


The splits are known as surface checks. They are not at all uncommon on thicker boards. If you look at the ends of your lumber, you are likely to see that it was cut from the center of the tree. As it is dried, the outer rings contract more than those closer to the center and they develop a split. It usually tapers to nothing as it goes deeper into the piece. Proper drying techniques can usually minimize the size of the checks. The majority of treated lumber is southern yellow pine. How dry it is depends on how long it was setting after treatment and whether it was kiln dried after being treated. Normally, large timbers like 6x6s have a higher level of treatment because they are likely to be in ground contact. Lumber treatment can be from .25 pounds per cubic foot (above ground use) up to .60. In some cases, large timbers can be treated to refusal (TTR). That can cause them to be wetter. Look for a stamp or tag that may have KDAT on it and the level of treatment. Also look for the treatment type. Lumber exceeding 5" can be treated with CCA (Chromium Copper Arsenate) or it may be treated with ACQ (Alkaline Copper Quaternary). That could make a color difference. The number of knots is related to the lumber grade. Grade 1 would have fewer and smaller knots than grade 2.
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Old 07-01-2013, 07:02 PM   #5
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how does one compare treated wood?


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The majority of treated lumber is southern yellow pine.
.. on the East Coast. Douglas fir in California and much of the rest of the West.
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Old 07-01-2013, 07:12 PM   #6
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how does one compare treated wood?


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.. on the East Coast. Douglas fir in California and much of the rest of the West.
That is the truth...I never met SYP until I moved East of the Rockies. SYP is garbage, thankfully I got to work most of my life without having to deal with that crap.
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:30 PM   #7
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how does one compare treated wood?


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That is the truth...I never met SYP until I moved East of the Rockies. SYP is garbage, thankfully I got to work most of my life without having to deal with that crap.
I agree wholeheartedly, but if you think SYP is bad, wait till you use SPF. I dont. I use Fir or Hem Fir only. I simply refuse to use SPF.
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Old 07-01-2013, 11:16 PM   #8
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how does one compare treated wood?


SPF is what most builders use in my area, we did southern pine when I was in Florida.
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Old 07-02-2013, 06:36 AM   #9
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how does one compare treated wood?


I figured that the OP was in MO, he is most likely to have treated SYP. As sure as the sun will rise, SYP will warp and twist. SPF is the generic term for lumber cut from Spruce/Pine/Fir. If you are using Fir, you are using the F in SPF.
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Old 07-02-2013, 02:59 PM   #10
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how does one compare treated wood?


so I was at the lumber yard and picked up my 6x6x10's and was talking about the pergola and its spans, he suggested that I might want to have special ordered in some kiln dried wood for that, because they are probably going to be wet and they will bend and warp as they are dried on the pergola with little to keep it straight.

This appears to not be a bad idea, though I guess cost will determine how appealing it is.

I called and I have southern yellow pine in this area.


Last edited by csmonte; 07-02-2013 at 03:01 PM. Reason: adding text
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