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-   -   How do I replace termite damaged top plate under trusses on a load bearing wall? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/how-do-i-replace-termite-damaged-top-plate-under-trusses-load-bearing-wall-21058/)

durangorob 05-15-2008 11:25 PM

How do I replace termite damaged top plate under trusses on a load bearing wall?
 
What I thought was replacing some drywall in my guest bath turned into a real can of worms. What I found was alot of termite damage ...most of it on the two 2x4 top plates that run the entire length of the room, about 12 feet. And the top plate that runs down the ajoining wall that runs the length of the bathtub and then back across the width of the tub. The 12 foot section in under two trusses that are nailed together, so I am sure this is a load bering wall. There is a bedroom on the other side and my hall that runs on the other side of the tub. There were a some damage done to the studs behind the toliet. How do I support the trusses when I take out the damaged top plates ? Any help is greatly appreciated.

mark942 05-16-2008 04:52 AM

2x4 temp wall. Or top plate supported with a few posts & hydraulic jacks. Depends how long your going to need to be working. :thumbsup:

Termite 05-16-2008 07:52 AM

Yes, you'll have to frame a temporary bearing wall as close as reasonably possible to the damaged wall. You'll then be able to cut out the damaged portions and replace them. If the ends of the studs have any damage at all I'd suggest sistering a new full-length stud up against the damaged ones. Be sure to overlap your top plates at least 24" to retain the plate's tensile strength along the length of the entire wall...No butt joints without the other plate overlapping...Nail both plates together. If you have any material left after the termites go you, I'd suggest nailing the exterior sheathing to the top plate at 6" o.c.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-16-2008 09:47 AM

Examples of "temporary structural walls" built and placed to support load bearing walls during repairs/alterations:

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...T/IMG_1276.jpg

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...T/IMG_0873.jpg

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...T/IMG_0874.jpg

Termite 05-16-2008 11:34 AM

A picture says a thousand words! That ought to explain what needs to be done!!! :thumbsup:

jbob 06-03-2008 09:37 PM

support
 
If the house is fairly new (built within the last 35 years) and the trusses are
real engineered trusses assembled with gang nails, you shouldn't need any
support under interior walls. The trusses are self supporting. Technically, with
a standard truss system, there are no "load bearing walls" except exterior walls.

Termite 06-04-2008 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbob (Post 127681)
If the house is fairly new (built within the last 35 years) and the trusses are
real engineered trusses assembled with gang nails, you shouldn't need any
support under interior walls. The trusses are self supporting. Technically, with
a standard truss system, there are no "load bearing walls" except exterior walls.

I know you're trying to help, but this statement is way too generalized and doesn't hold true in many cases. Yes, many (or even most) homes' trusses are clear-span trusses, and removal of an interior wall would not affect their performance. However, a considerable amount of trusses do have interior bearing points that must be supported. In new construction, those bearing points are often clearly identified on the trusses with red stickers that say "bearing point." In a repair situation, it would be difficult for someone without much experience with trusses to tell what they're dealing with, so it's better safe than sorry when it comes to supporting walls.

A frequent mistake I see in the field is when framers don't pay attention to the engineering packet for the project's trusses...They install trusses backwards, thereby missing the interior bearing points on trusses that require them.

SEMAC 07-25-2011 07:45 AM

Help when I was in the roof I noticed that about two metres of the top plate hard wood between the kitchen and loungeroom has been destroyed by termites 2 x 4 top plate eaten half way down. How can I fix this section without taking the whole wall out. The roof is over 35 years old and was constructed separating not like a modern roof. Some of the trusses is nailed into the top plate.Could I cut out a section of the cornish and wall gyprock and replace 2 metres of the damaged top plate. Of I will use two braces to support the rest of the roof while I am replacing that section. Any ideas and is it able to done without taking the whole wall out?


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