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Old 07-12-2006, 07:44 AM   #1
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French door installation


Hello! 1st post here. We had a contractor install a set of french doors that took the place of a sliding glass door that leads to a concrete breezway between the house and the garage. With the french doors installed, there is nothing to support the threshold. With the sliding door in place it was not a worry, but without removing the french doors how can I support the threshold? Wood will not work due to rain water entering the breezway. Can I concrete under the threshold somehow? Thanks for any help!!

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Old 07-12-2006, 05:58 PM   #2
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French door installation


How much space (height) is there that you want to fill-in for support under the threshold?

Assuming it is a larger type space:
There are other 'solid' type materials you can use. You can use pressure treated lumber - it comes in variouse sizes including 1/2" and 3/4" thick plywood, etc...

You could also use PVC composite boards. They also come in various thicknesses and sizes. You can even finish-off the kickboard face with it - and it won't need paint.

Maybe you could use both. PT to build up the threshold and PVC composite to cover it and make it look right.

If it is a more narrow area height, Let's say 1/8"-1/2" of space you want to reinforce:

Simply slide CEDAR shims (or cedar shakes) underneath - on each side, until you can stand on the threshold and feel no 'give'. (Cedar won't rot -good for outdoor use).
Score the extra left over ends and cut or chisel them off clean. (You can also use liquid adhesive on them when sliding under the threshold)
Then seal up around the threshold edges with an exterior grade dark colored silicone or cement-type caulking - to keep the elements out, and give it a neat and clean appearance.

PS- I am really surprised that your 'contractor' didn't reinforce the area under the threshold as part of his door installation. We have replaced many exterior doors af all styles and we always make sure that the thresholds, (which are usually flexible aluminum), are re-inforced and nice & solid.

-2 cents-


Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-12-2006 at 07:57 PM.
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Old 07-12-2006, 06:08 PM   #3
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French door installation


If it is a small void then you could try mortar mix.

?
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Old 07-12-2006, 08:02 PM   #4
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French door installation


Quote:
Originally Posted by redline
If it is a small void then you could try mortar mix.

?
Actually, if it's a narrow area, and you don't want to remove the doors as was written. Then mortar mix would not be a good choice, as trying to get it 'stuffed' or 'pushed' underneath the threshold would not make it 'snug' and supportive. There would also be air pockets that would not give a firm & consistent support to the threshold.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-12-2006 at 08:52 PM.
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Old 07-13-2006, 05:00 PM   #5
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French door installation


Thanks for all of the input! I like this place. What I did was bought some quikcrete fast setting concrete mix and mixed it fairly heavy and stuffed it under the threshold. We then placed a 1x4 on the outside of the threshold and clamped it to the inside and outside of the threshold and let it set most off the day prior to removing the 1x4 and it seems to be doing good and it looks fairly nice. My concern is if it will hold up and not crack and begin to come apart. It is a flip house, but I still have pride in the endresult and hope that it holds together.
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Old 07-23-2006, 11:16 AM   #6
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French door installation


Dale, if you do it again with a concrete product add alot of fiberglass strands to prevent cracking. They come in a little bag and are sold next to the cement. Either way, the cement will generally fail in a few years.
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Old 07-23-2006, 05:24 PM   #7
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French door installation


Quote:
Originally Posted by fhivinylwindows
Dale, if you do it again with a concrete product add alot of fiberglass strands to prevent cracking. They come in a little bag and are sold next to the cement. Either way, the cement will generally fail in a few years.
Yes....it will crack and crumble...Maybe alot earlier than in a few years, in fact....

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