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Seilo360 04-09-2013 12:54 PM

Framing Q's for 1800's remodel
 
Brand new, kinda feeling my way through this remodel. We have a huge 1800's Colonial and have decided to convert the 3rd floor (attic) into a master suite. Due to the location of the main stack, my plumber says I must raise the floor for the bathroom by 4-6 inches for pitch, which leads to the following questions(I know what I believe is right, but always appreciate expert knowledge):

1. Should I remove existing subfloor or cover with new framing?
2. Should new floor joists be laid parallel or perpendicular to existing?
3. does every joint require a support bracket?
4. What type of wood is common for this application?

Thanks

Chris

jagans 04-09-2013 01:07 PM

I cannot see what you have, but it seems to me that it would be better to box out below right at the wall where needed instead of raising the attic floor, but I dont know, because Im not there. I really dont see why your current ceiling joists do not have enough depth to get enough slope but maybe he's right.

Seilo360 04-09-2013 01:31 PM

I need to achieve 5' of lateral travel but only have the depth of a 2x6 to do so.

GBrackins 04-09-2013 03:01 PM

can you run a ceiling soffit box in the room on the 2nd floor below where the bathroom is going? if so you could keep your attic floor level

as jagans said we can't see your place, even though I'm a lot closer than he and probably have better eye sight :wink:

Seilo360 04-10-2013 08:06 AM

Unfortunately, the room directly below is a bathroom. Boxing would cut the shower height.

GBrackins 04-10-2013 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seilo360 (Post 1156003)
Unfortunately, the room directly below is a bathroom. Boxing would cut the shower height.

would that be an issue? how high is the ceiling in there now?

I ask because building up a floor can be an issue when you get up in the middle of the night and forget you have to step up in the bathroom.

just food for thought

jagans 04-10-2013 09:34 AM

Im sure Gary is correct about who has better eyesight. Im blind in one eye and cant see out the other.

Are you sure about the 2 x 6? on a house built in the 19th century?

Frankly, if you move the toilet close to the wall that will take care of the largest pipe, and the lav and shower should be OK already, since we are talking 2 and 1.5 inch pipe.

I would not raise the floor for any reason. Very dangerous.

Seattle2k 04-10-2013 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 1156014)
I ask because building up a floor can be an issue when you get up in the middle of the night and forget you have to step up in the bathroom.


Much better than waking up groggy in the morning, staggering into the shower and whacking your head on the low ceiling. :wink::biggrin:

GBrackins 04-10-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seattle2k (Post 1156107)
Much better than waking up groggy in the morning, staggering into the shower and whacking your head on the low ceiling. :wink::biggrin:

thus my reason for asking what their current height is, the 2009 International Residential Code requires the following (their code may vary but I do believe the CT code is based upon it or the 2006 edition).

SECTION R305 CEILING HEIGHT

R305.1 Minimum height. Habitable space, hallways, bathrooms, toilet rooms, laundry rooms and portions of basements containing these spaces shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet (2134 mm).

Exceptions:
1. For rooms with sloped ceilings, at least 50 percent of the required floor area of the room must have a ceiling height of at least 7 feet (2134 mm) and no portion of the required floor area may have a ceiling height of less than 5 feet (1524 mm).2. Bathrooms shall have a minimum ceiling height of 6 feet 8 inches (2032 mm) at the center of the front clearance area for fixtures as shown in Figure R307.1. The ceiling height above fixtures shall be such that the fixture is capable of being used for its intended purpose. A shower or tub equipped with a showerhead shall have a minimum ceiling height of 6 feet 8 inches (2032 mm) above a minimum area 30 inches (762 mm) by 30 inches (762 mm) at the showerhead.If they do not have the finish height over the shower then obviously it would not comply with the code.

of course waking up in the middle of the night and tripping over the step and falling face first into the toilet is not a walk in the part either ... LOL

But I hear what you say Seattle2k, valid point

Seilo360 04-16-2013 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1156068)
Im sure Gary is correct about who has better eyesight. Im blind in one eye and cant see out the other.

Are you sure about the 2 x 6? on a house built in the 19th century?

Frankly, if you move the toilet close to the wall that will take care of the largest pipe, and the lav and shower should be OK already, since we are talking 2 and 1.5 inch pipe.

I would not raise the floor for any reason. Very dangerous.


I think this round has to go to Jagans. Upon reviewing the plumbers notes, and measuring again myself, the floor joists are definately not 2x6's. We have revamped the layout to put the toilet 2' from the main stack and will be sistering the floor joists for added strength for the bathroom area. No raising floor (trip hazard), or lowering ceiling(concussion hazard), though I still feel that raising the floor proves a better alternative to lowering the ceiling(try not feeling cramped when you're 6'7" in a 7' shower!!!).

Thanks all.


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