Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-04-2013, 01:17 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Canada -- Toronto
Posts: 22
Rewards Points: 14
Default

Framing Basements


I'm starting to frame the walls of my basement, but before begin, I have a couple of questions. If you see the black pipe (Gas Pipe) It this pipe in the right place or the wrong place? because , how I should be do to frame the ceiling? I should move this pipe? Where?






The second question is about the insulation in the wall I have 50% insulated and the other 50% concrete. I have to remove the all insulation and re-insulate again the whole wall? or insulated only the bottom part? and after that start the framing?



Thanks for your time

pavlito24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 01:37 PM   #2
MarginallyQualified
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Winston-Salem NC
Posts: 3,709
Rewards Points: 2,092
Default

Framing Basements


Quote:
Originally Posted by pavlito24 View Post
Is this pipe in the right place or the wrong place?
I should move this pipe?
Unless you NEED to move the gas pipe for some mechanical reason... leave it be.
Plan to use removable drop ceiling panels in this area.

Quote:
I have to remove the all insulation and re-insulate again the whole wall?
or insulated only the bottom part? and after that start the framing?
Start your framing in front of the existing insulation.
Plan to ADD additional insulation into the new and much larger void.

The question... is about the vapor barrier practices where you are.
I'll leave that to the Canadians.

TarheelTerp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 03:13 PM   #3
Thread killer
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwestern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 304
Rewards Points: 268
Default

Framing Basements


Could be a trick of the light, but your second photo, right under your duct work, looks like there is some condensation behind it. If there is, rip the crap insulating blanket off the wall.
__________________
You can have it good, fast or cheap. Pick two.
Canucker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 03:25 PM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Canada -- Toronto
Posts: 22
Rewards Points: 14
Default

Framing Basements


Quote:
Originally Posted by Canucker View Post
Could be a trick of the light, but your second photo, right under your duct work, looks like there is some condensation behind it. If there is, rip the crap insulating blanket off the wall.
You are talking about the circle area??



It's only a trick of the light...

Men, you pay so much attention!!!
That is great for me.. Thanks
pavlito24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 12:39 AM   #5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,967
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Framing Basements


I'd get some XPS in the rims and seal the joints in ductwork in ceiling cavity against moisture.

Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 08:27 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Framing Basements


The distance from ductwork to wall is so short I would just close it in rather than framing around ductwork up to ceiling and over to walls. Drop ceiling in that area would be a good idea.

How much of your wall is below grade?
akjose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 11:23 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Framing Basements


It looks like that air vent is your bigger obstacle. Doing a suspended ceiling (see below for example) might be the best option to contain the air vent, pipes, etc. The major downside is the clearance height you lose. From some of your other pictures, it looks like that MAY be an issue. The benefit of doing this type of ceiling is a little more architectural choice, ease of access to pipes, vents, etc when/if you ever need to fix/repair/modify an item.

Obviously, a drywall ceiling could also be used to get as close to the headers as possible. For maximum clearance, you'd need to move the gas pipe and the red wire and take them through the header boards. Alternatively you could use fir strips to provide enough clearance so you snug the drywall ceiling just below the gas pipe. Either way, you have to find a creative way to deal with that air vent, which looks like it's in the middle of the room. If it was on an exterior wall, you could just box down (which I would do all the way around the room, making it look like you stepped-boxed ceiling).




An example of the box drop I'm talking about. Also called a trey ceiling.


Last edited by nolimits76; 02-05-2013 at 11:27 AM.
nolimits76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 05:42 PM   #8
Thread killer
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Southwestern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 304
Rewards Points: 268
Default

Framing Basements


http://www.ceilinglink.com/ Don't have to lose a lot of head space with a drop ceiling, this works great.
__________________
You can have it good, fast or cheap. Pick two.
Canucker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 05:48 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 27,518
Rewards Points: 4,152
Default

Framing Basements


There joist not headers.
A header is over a door or window.
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 07:04 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 197
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Framing Basements


Unless u want a lot more work your gonna have to go around that stuff. Box around the air ducts using bridging(ferring strips) on the flat to minimize lost space. Pack down ceiling just a little bit past pipe (so if pipe is 1 1/2 pack down 1 3/4 to prevent bowing Sheetrock where the tie downs are) so that u can Sheetrock. Ps mark the pipe on Sheetrock
kaschmid3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 10:05 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Framing Basements


Regarding the bulkhead, I would frame it down the vertical side of the heat duct, then go across the horizontal (ceiling) right to the wall.
I have found that framing with metal channel and drywall is much easier and more square than with 2x4's or 2x2's, plus saving 2 inches of height.

As for the insulation, I would rip current off the wall and replace with either spray foam, or batt's. The current insulation is only R8, batt's can prove to have a higher R value.

If you choose this method, there are some new insights into leaving the insulation 12-18" up from the bottom plate of the wall, as well as the vapour barrier.

Hope this helps,

Swan

Swan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
framing basements TJshearin Insulation 3 01-11-2013 02:44 PM
Any opinions on panelized framing? TitaniumVT Building & Construction 5 12-29-2009 02:56 PM
Framing for drywall under Spiral staircase clemon03 Drywall & Plaster 6 07-17-2009 04:49 PM
Framing Gun - Nail Shank Diameter Questions... MoparAutoworks Building & Construction 5 07-03-2006 10:27 PM
Framing a 16 foot high wall for shop pranderson Building & Construction 10 01-01-2006 05:23 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.