Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-18-2012, 11:23 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Help! I'm facing an issue where the door jamb is rotting away (see pic).

The house is a split-level and has no gutters. What I suspect is happening is that water is bouncing off the patio up onto the door and jamb - frequently.


I have 2 questions. First, is there a good way to repair the door jamb? Two, I'd appreciate suggestions as to how to remedy the water issue. Gutters may the the obvious answer, however I'd like to hear other alternatives.

Thank you!



Attached Thumbnails
Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation-front-door-frame-total-view.jpg  

polebarn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2012, 01:42 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 2,040
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


first stop it from happening. Gutters are the main thing.
1. Is the sill sloped away from the door?
2. Is it like this on both sides or just one? if just the one is the sill not level and water is running to that side?

If splash still happens from water hitting the deck, which I have never seen before, put a mat in front of the door which will stop the water from splashing.

to remedy this your door may need to be installed level,good time for a new door. Or if you really like that door you can get special putty for fixing rot like that.
http://www.hereandthere.org/oldhouse...ayed-wood.html

mae-ling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2012, 01:52 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 843
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Auto Bondo or Dura Glass!
Hardway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 09:25 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vermont
Posts: 762
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


I always cut the jamb where it becomes solid wood, fashion a new piece of door jamb, prime it (or use Azek) and use a strip of plywood to sister it to the existing frame. It holds better than bondo and it'll hold the closer bracket for the storm door that will prevent rot in the future
mrgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 09:36 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,342
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


You can mess around with that cheap door until the cows come home and it still would be a cheap door prone to rotting and rusting.
If it was mine I would order a new fiberglass door, vinyl jams, vinyl brick molding, adjustable sill, double bored.
While the door is out add one of these under the door.
http://www.jamsill.com/
This way the threshold will never leak back into the house, and the door will be come a non issue forever.
Any time we get stuck have to install a cheap door like yours we try talking the customer into at least letting us wrap the jambs with aluminum coil stock and change the wooden brick moulding to vinyl.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 09:43 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vermont
Posts: 762
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


An effective fix is cheaper than a new door and the pan protects the area of framing below and beyond the door, not the door frame itself
mrgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 10:41 AM   #7
Hardcore DIY'er
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 67
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


I cant tell for certain but it looks like the sill was installed level, so it allows water to sit on the sill. I have in the past patched up mine, similar to what mrgins said. Cut the wood out past the rot, this can take a few cuts because rot may be further on the back of the wood than the front due to weather drying the face out quicker. Patch in a new piece, if its an area prone to water exposure I always use treated lumber. Typically the wood is a little larger than kiln dried non treated lumber, or if you are in an older home where a 1x6 was 6" you will need to rip a board to the right size. After patching in the wood sand the joint just below flush and then get some bondo from walmart or an auto parts place. Mix a small amount and fill and sand the seam flush again. Prime, paint and finally silicon (caulk) where the sill meets the jamb so future water doesnt soak into the wood. Maintenance wise make sure any wood surfaces exposed to elements are checked for caulking annually as well as repainted if showing any cracking, chipping or wear.

Oh and get some gutters.

Edit: also looks like its soaking all the way through the door, staining shows up long after rot starts. I wouldnt be surprised to find some rot on the actual 2x4's of the door frame. Hopefully its minimal and can be dried out, treated, filled and protected for a good future.

Last edited by EvilNCarnate; 01-19-2012 at 10:44 AM.
EvilNCarnate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 12:36 PM   #8
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Step #1: Install Gutters
Step #2: Replace Door & Frame (Or just frame if you want)
Step #3: Cold drink
__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 12:42 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,342
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Never use pressure treated if you insisting on not fixing this right.
It's going to srink when it drys out, Paint will not stay stuck to it.
You would have to wait a few months for it to dry out enough to seal.
If any material is removed from it, the exposed area is no longer pressure treated, only ACQ fastners would be able to be used.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 01:08 PM   #10
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Never use pressure treated if you insisting on not fixing this right.
It's going to srink when it drys out, Paint will not stay stuck to it.
You would have to wait a few months for it to dry out enough to seal.
If any material is removed from it, the exposed area is no longer pressure treated, only ACQ fastners would be able to be used.
+1...if rot resistance is the goal, then pvc trim is the route to go...
__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 01:12 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,342
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Does everone here know that doors like that one can be ordered with a Composite already finger jointed at the bottom?
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 02:07 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vermont
Posts: 762
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Does everone here know that doors like that one can be ordered with a Composite already finger jointed at the bottom?
Yes, but I don't know how effective they are.
mrgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 02:12 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,342
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Better then nothing, your stull stuck with a wood frame that no one ever seems to take the time to paint untill it's to late.
When those doors come new there's a sticker right on the door that says paint within 24 hours of installing with 100% latex paint, never paint the door a dark color. How many times have we all seen just primed and never painted doors rotted and rusted out or the paints shot, the gaskets in the windows are no good anymore from the door getting so hot.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 02:27 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vermont
Posts: 762
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


You're right, the door and frame need to have a finish coat, but the composite at the bottom still has a joint where it meets the wood part of the frame. Also, I believe it's Thermatru doors that have the gaskets that stand up to high temperatures. I've replaced them on doors of other brands too. Up here in Vermont, the only way to protect the surface of an exterior door is to install a storm door, and as you said, don't paint it dark
mrgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 02:36 PM   #15
Hardcore DIY'er
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 67
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Exterior Door Jamb Rot Remediation


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Never use pressure treated if you insisting on not fixing this right.
It's going to srink when it drys out, Paint will not stay stuck to it.
You would have to wait a few months for it to dry out enough to seal.
If any material is removed from it, the exposed area is no longer pressure treated, only ACQ fastners would be able to be used.
Paint will too stick to ACQ, and it wont take months to dry out. I typicall store my building project boards in my garage for a few days to let them dry out enough (surface wise) for paint. I repaired my garage door casing completely out of pressure treated and painted it, no noticeable shrinking, no paint peeling stood up to a Spring rain, Summer scorch, Fall drying and Winter winds for a year now.

The cut areas wouldnt be exposed as they should be painted. Using ACQ treated lumber reduces the chances of having to do this repair again in 5 or 10 years if the water issue isnt immediately addressed. As well if he cuts the board so the cut end meets the original wood and if he has to rip a board to width he can make that cut on the inside edge. Leaving the fully treated surface on the outside and also leaving the milled edge on the outside. Ultimately he could go the recommended route with treated lumber and brush on treatment on any cut edges but I have yet to see anyone do that. Even I dont, I just try to keep my cut edges where they will receive the least exposure.

ACQ fasteners are simply hot dipped or coated fasteners, they arent exactly specialty fasteners that are going to break the bank.

I see it as a very feasable option for a repair in an area that obviously has moisture related issues. If he cant alleviate the moisture issues completely then at least he can mitigate the possibility of rot.

There are a hundred ways to do this, I presented one. Not everyone wants to go out and buy a 400 dollar door when they can make a 20 dollar fix to a perfectly good one.

EvilNCarnate is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
door repair rot


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mold remediation = replacing a few studs Jordan_Bailey84 General DIY Discussions 0 08-08-2011 11:00 AM
Crawlspace Foundation Remediation - Permit Pitfalls? Thunder Chicken General DIY Discussions 1 08-06-2011 08:55 PM
Botched Asbestos Removal Several Years Ago...Remediation? vs1988 General DIY Discussions 10 08-16-2010 11:28 PM
A Mold Remediation Emergency White Elk General DIY Discussions 29 10-04-2008 09:01 AM
Flooded basement and Mold Remediation? Lightyear General DIY Discussions 34 04-25-2007 07:09 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.