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Old 02-02-2009, 12:55 PM   #1
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Exterior Door Help


I just bought my first house last week and went to change out the locks and noticed a few problems that I need help with fixing.

Door #1
The side door has stripped screw holes where the dead bolt's plate screws in to the end of the actual door. I think the jamb is fine. Would it work to put some kind of putty in the hole and use a longer screw?

Door #2
The front door used to have a plate on the door jamb that required a really big hole. When I put the new smaller plate up to the hole that's in the jamb, it doesn't fit. Since the hole in the jamb is too big, the new plate either has to go too high or too low. Is there any way to cut out that part of the jamb and put a new piece of wood in it's place and then drill out a new hole?

Thanks

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Old 02-02-2009, 01:02 PM   #2
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Exterior Door Help


#1 you are correct, fill it with wood filler and use a longer not fatter screw. #8 or #10
#2 Use use a router with a pattern bit. This has a bearing to ride along the jamb edge and cut a perfect slot. Leave the round edge. It is easier to hand sand a round edge into the patch piece. Cut a slice of wood to fit snugly. Glue into place with exterior grade glue. Make this piece a little thinker than the cutout and sand flush. Use a center punch to be sure to drill the hole where you need it for the jamb latch plate.

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Old 02-02-2009, 10:20 PM   #3
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For the side door you can also take wooden toothpicks and fill the old hole with them, pond with a hammer and the excess should break flush and then screw the plate back on.
For the entry door, not sure if you are saying that your problem is that the existing hole prevents you from screwing the new plate in where it needs to go due to lack of wood where the new holes line up. If so, how about screwing it where it need to go with longer screws that can reach the stud beyond the jamb?
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Old 02-03-2009, 05:40 AM   #4
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Scott,
If you're referring to the size of the strike plate on the jamd it sounds like you have an entire new lockset.The new undersize plate also has to be centered so your screw holes may not align either unless you cut and patch..
Rather than cut out , fill glue, etc, you can also try an oversized strike plate which gives added security sometimes using an extra pair of screws and a different screw hole pattern.You can buy a solid brass one for $5-8 . These are both decorative and functional.
Just a tip, before you do any final cutting and ibnstall, check your entire door openingfor level and draft seal. If you do all the cutting first and then reseal it changes the door's final alignment and your deadbolts will be very tight
I had to force my front door a few years ago and I think you'll save a lot of time with this option plus have the added strength for security. I also added longer screws.
Worst case if your old locks are good you could also consider have them rekeyed....
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Old 02-04-2009, 03:05 AM   #5
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#1 Use a golf tee and glue it in the hole, then cut off the excess. Drill a pilot hole and use the same screw. Using a larger screw will mean the head will be bigger and will project out from the door. If the space is narrow, the screw head will cut a groove into the jamb.
#2 Agree with Bob.
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Old 02-04-2009, 09:11 AM   #6
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While wedging wood into worn out screw holes WILL hold new, or even the old screws better than before, why not do the job all the way? You have a chance to do it right, and make it better than new. Don't pass it up.

It is not a difficult matter to drill out new 1/2" holes where the old screw holes are. Fill those holes with 1/2" OAK dowels, glued in place and driven flush with the surface.

Now go ahead and drill pilot holes for your screws in the oak dowels. You will find that the screws will not only hold better in the OAK, but the OAK will far outlast the original fir without wallowing out.
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Old 02-04-2009, 06:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott_L View Post
I just bought my first house last week and went to change out the locks and noticed a few problems that I need help with fixing.

Door #1
The side door has stripped screw holes where the dead bolt's plate screws in to the end of the actual door. I think the jamb is fine. Would it work to put some kind of putty in the hole and use a longer screw?

Door #2
The front door used to have a plate on the door jamb that required a really big hole. When I put the new smaller plate up to the hole that's in the jamb, it doesn't fit. Since the hole in the jamb is too big, the new plate either has to go too high or too low. Is there any way to cut out that part of the jamb and put a new piece of wood in it's place and then drill out a new hole?

Thanks
golf tees and the large kitchen matches with a dab of glue both work much better than wood filler for plugging stripped screw holes, as they provide a much better bite for the new screws.

The strike problem can be solved by installing a wood filler, known as a "dutchman" in trade lingo, but an easier diy solution IMO is to go to a locksmith shop or architectural hardware supplier and look at the vast array of different sizes and shapes of strikes available. They most likely will have one that will only require a little chisel work to cover up the existing misfit. Even your local big box has a minimal assortment of oversize strikes.

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