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dferber 09-23-2006 09:55 PM

Entry Door Dilema!
 
Hi! I need to replace both front and side entry doors. Would you believe they are hollow core doors??? House is brick, 1930. I measured the side door from brick edge to brick edge on the outside and got about 33 1/2" to 33 3/4". All the entry doors I have found state you need a rough opening of 34 1/2" for a 32" door. Am I out of luck? Not sure what to do at this point. I have been in this house 5 yrs and really want to get this fixed. I hate to have to spend big bucks for custom doors. I would never recoup the cost for that. All suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

K2eoj 09-23-2006 11:06 PM

If the opening is nice and plumb you will get a 32" door into a 33-1/2 opening. 2-1/2 " over door size is to allow for some bad framing. Go down the depot and measure a 32" prehung exterior and include the jamb. It should measure 33-1/4. Those jambs can be shaved a little also depending on your skill level. Your height might be more of an issue on an older home. Got a picture??

AtlanticWBConst. 09-24-2006 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dferber (Post 19015)
Hi! I need to replace both front and side entry doors. Would you believe they are hollow core doors??? House is brick, 1930. I measured the side door from brick edge to brick edge on the outside and got about 33 1/2" to 33 3/4". All the entry doors I have found state you need a rough opening of 34 1/2" for a 32" door. Am I out of luck? Not sure what to do at this point. I have been in this house 5 yrs and really want to get this fixed. I hate to have to spend big bucks for custom doors. I would never recoup the cost for that. All suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Basically, by the measurements you provided, you have about 34 1/8" average of R.O for each door width (Rough Opening space to work with)

You still would need a minimum of 1/8" of space on each side of the door (assuming that the brick to brick opening is plum)
Total space needed = 33 1/4" to 34"
If the doors you find in your area are requiring a minimum R.O. of 34 1/2" for a 32" door......this is tough and tight.
That would mean this: Door jams are going to run at 3/4" per side on the entry doors you have available. That means you would have to remove about 1/2" or more of the 3/4" you have on EACH side. By their requirements, that would not work.
Regardless of what the information says on the actual doors at your retailer, you should go with your tape measure to check it out...as already stated.
Also:
I suggest that you continue to shop, search, look, ask.
You might want to try a salvage business that specializes in older 'odd-sized' entry doors in decent shape.
Also, do more research online. There are many door manufacturers that will sell to the public for a fraction of the price you will pay for the same 'marked-up' door at your local large home store retailer.

You have a few options to choose from. I'm sure that I can come up with more, but it's late and I am off to bed.....

Good Luck

fhivinylwindows 09-24-2006 09:52 PM

Your RO is measured from stud to stud. Try to remove your interior trim, cut back the plaster and get this measurement.

dferber 09-25-2006 05:44 AM

Yes, I have some more measuring to do at the store. I am aware the rough opening is from stud to stud, but I am afraid to open up the area and then find out there are problems. Can't leave a gaping hole in the side of the house without a door ready to pop in! Hm...so how would an installer measure it for an estimate??? Anyway, I do know there are studs on either side of the door inside because there are electrical switches on each side of the door. But the problem is you still have to tilt the new door into place from the outside, and that is why I thought the brick opening on the outside was more critical. And I do not want to just get a new door because I want the door to be well fit with weatherstripping, etc. I guess next step is to go the store with tape measure and ask to measure the frames.
PS: the current door in place is just a hollow core door and measures 32". It was "retrofitted" to go into the space. No weatherstripping or anything.

K2eoj 09-25-2006 08:50 AM

Quote:

But the problem is you still have to tilt the new door into place from the outside.
No you don't. If you take the brick mold off yuo can set it from the inside. In your case you probably need to leave the brickmold off and make some trim or rip the brickmold etc.

Setting a door in a new construction can take minutes.
Setting a door in an existing house can take hours and might require an experienced carpenter. I always run into 10 or 15 little issues when setting a door in existing.

AtlanticWBConst. 09-25-2006 06:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammerslammer (Post 19137)

Setting a door in a new construction can take minutes.
Setting a door in an existing house can take hours and might require an experienced carpenter. I always run into 10 or 15 little issues when setting a door in existing.

He's absolutely 110 % right.

(99 % of replacement entry doors end up taking all day and alot of adjustments to fit and then to tie in all exterior and interior trim, threshold, etc...they test your patience and your skill level)

Double A 09-26-2006 01:14 AM

Another option short of a prehung door is just to replace the slab. In other words, the door itself.

As this is a job that can require special tools and jigs and no small amount of skill, I'd say, hire it out.

As for weather stripping, you can add it to the existing jamb.

Pictures would help greatly as well.

dferber 09-26-2006 05:40 AM

I will get some pictures later today and post tonight. But with all the advise you have provided, I am probably leaning toward hiring this out. I hate to do that, but I will admit when something is more than I can handle. Then the question is.....who? Lowe's? Another door company? Decisions, decisions.

Double A 09-27-2006 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dferber (Post 19206)
I will get some pictures later today and post tonight. But with all the advise you have provided, I am probably leaning toward hiring this out. I hate to do that, but I will admit when something is more than I can handle. Then the question is.....who? Lowe's? Another door company? Decisions, decisions.

Lowe's doesn't do installations. They hire it out. Do yourself a favor, look in your local phone book or search the Internet for a local door shop. or...

Ask the folks at the big local lumber yard. Many times they have a door division.

One that actually makes doors. They are more common than you'd think. Ask them for some tradesmen that specialize in door replacements. Get references, and check the references.

dferber 10-13-2006 05:03 AM

Decided to go with a company to install. They specialize in doors. Next Monday is installation. Will save lots of headaches. Thanks for all replies and advice!

AtlanticWBConst. 10-13-2006 06:47 AM

yes, I think that might be your best choice, the replacement conditions that you wrote about, may warrant hiring professional installation.

dferber 10-17-2006 06:19 AM

Yesterday I had the doors installed. THey are steel replacement doors which have a steel frame which slips right over the old jam. They include the sill and everything else that comes with prehung doors. Nice part is that you do not have to rip out the old jams. They were a perfect solution to my nonstandard dimensions. Just wish I could have done these doors myself, but oh well. There are many more projects waiting so I will have a go at those!


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