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Old 04-16-2012, 11:39 AM   #1
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


I have a question about ornate Victorian style door and window headers. Example: I take a piece of plain flat stock, add a crown detail at the top and some moldings at the bottom and use it in place of mitered casing. Sorry if I am not using the correct terminology.


Is the pictured header an acceptable way to install this type of header? Notice how the outside edge of the flat stock in the crosshead extends past the outside of the casing? Do I have to line up the outside edge of my casing with the outside edge of the flat surface in my header? I wanted my crosshead to overhang the casing more, but that would prevent the crosshead's flat outside surface edge from lining up with the outside edge of my casing. Can the position of the crosshead and casing be a personal choice rather than a rule? Thanks, Rox


Last edited by aliosh; 04-16-2012 at 12:44 PM.
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:00 PM   #2
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


I prefer it in line with the casing.

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Old 04-16-2012, 02:21 PM   #3
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


Like I tell my customers, This is how it's usually done, but we can do whatever you want. It's your house.
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:59 PM   #4
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


Geez, is that the polite way of saying...."it's your house and you can screw it up however you want".....?

I do like the "brim" effect from doing it this way and it looks OK to me....but what do I know? I was going to make little mini corbels to sit under the overhang. ( Yeah, I really was)

I just hope it doesn't look like a mistake. Tearing out trim really makes a mess of my walls.
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Old 04-16-2012, 05:35 PM   #5
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


It really comes down to personal preference.
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Old 04-16-2012, 05:54 PM   #6
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


i make a mock up of both and ask the customer which one they prefer
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:48 PM   #7
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


If your library has an archivist and a collection of old architectural drawings, you will find a wealth of detail drawings for architectural details like trim and all sorts of things. Why not go to the source for answers to your question? I restored a Queen Anne and found a set of the original prints on file. I spent too much time just mesmorized by the drawings!

Used bookstores sometimes have or can find you books about era architectural drawing including details. Again, loads of fun and very helpful. "Architectural Graphic Standards" was first published in the 1930s and brought all sorts of detail drawings of early century to the 30s construction into one volume.
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:58 PM   #8
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


http://images.search.yahoo.com/searc...door+crosshead
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Old 04-19-2012, 11:30 PM   #9
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


I think it actually looks pretty good. I think you're saying you wanted to do it this way, but now you're not sure because it doesn't look standard? That's one of things I like most about Victorian homes- there doesn't seem to be very many rules. Windows all over the house can be different sizes, rooms off of rooms off of rooms, and even additions on additions. All kinds of custom built-in's, sometimes different styles in the same room. I say if you like it, roll with it, and call it "custom"...
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:11 AM   #10
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


i think that looks pretty good. but you should do it how you want. which ever way you choose, i am sure it will look good.
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Old 04-20-2012, 06:09 PM   #11
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


having the flat portion of the header in line with the casings is easier on the eye. it creates a clean line and just looks proper. the additional moldings are what creates teh detail. play with the moldings applied to the flat stock to create a custom look
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Old 04-20-2012, 11:39 PM   #12
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door and window Crosshead questions (revised w/picture)


Quote:
Originally Posted by aliosh View Post
I have a question about ornate Victorian style door and window headers. Example: I take a piece of plain flat stock, add a crown detail at the top and some moldings at the bottom and use it in place of mitered casing. Sorry if I am not using the correct terminology.


Is the pictured header an acceptable way to install this type of header? Notice how the outside edge of the flat stock in the crosshead extends past the outside of the casing? Do I have to line up the outside edge of my casing with the outside edge of the flat surface in my header? I wanted my crosshead to overhang the casing more, but that would prevent the crosshead's flat outside surface edge from lining up with the outside edge of my casing. Can the position of the crosshead and casing be a personal choice rather than a rule? Thanks, Rox
This is totally conjecture and not a rule. But I believe the carpenter who trimmed this detail wanted the lower molding to conform better with the upper. Having the flat head piece line up with the door casing would limit the protrusion on the lower molding thus limiting the similarity to the upper crown's 1-3/4 to 2" extension. I personally think the approach taken in this detail is spot on to achieve that very effect.

If this had been suggested to me I would agree with it 100% albeit not your standard approach.

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